mmgemini

Leccy fan AGAIN LOL

33 posts in this topic

The Kenlow fan on my Defender has seized again melting the fan loom in the process. Alright doing the loom isn't a big job, I should soon sort that out.

The question is which make of fan. Do I go Kenlow again or some other make. All the brackets are made for the Kenlow.

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You don't sound like you want to go kenlow again to me.

I have a kenlow in my 200 but I'm not sure it works to be honest, I got a lot of melted wires a while back when I was searching for something else and I never checked to see if the fan is still going (thanks for the reminder)

Would be interested to see what people are reccomending

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When mine died, I took it to bits, spent £3.50 replacing the siezed bearing that was the cause of the problem and refitted it.

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When mine died, I took it to bits, spent £3.50 replacing the siezed bearing that was the cause of the problem and refitted it.

Doesn't look possible, wiring is burnt to inside the motor housing.

I'm told the new Kenlowe model are different to the one I have/ had in as much they use electronics now. Buying another Kenlowe means I already have the mountings I made for the original one

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If you have to have lectric waterproof SPAL have been good to me in the past

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Another vote for a Ford Mondao fan had one in a truck for some time now, brilliant bit of kit.

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Viscous on 45 and a cheapy electric off ebay on the 110 (only because you can't fit a Viscous on a disco 200 with a 3 bolt steering box).

Mike

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Mike, you're the only person I know who is so anti viscous fan, but surely this is proof enough of their superiority? Fit the correct fan, its shroud, and never worry again - if the viscous hub fails, a cable tie or two is all you need to bind it to the fan, and it has higher capacity than any combination of electric fans and can't set fire to your electrical system. Look at the trouble our Dutch friend is having with cooling the V8 he fit in that Defender, all because he's having to use electric fans.

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Mike, you're the only person I know who is so anti viscous fan, but surely this is proof enough of their superiority? Fit the correct fan, its shroud, and never worry again - if the viscous hub fails, a cable tie or two is all you need to bind it to the fan, and it has higher capacity than any combination of electric fans and can't set fire to your electrical system. Look at the trouble our Dutch friend is having with cooling the V8 he fit in that Defender, all because he's having to use electric fans.

I do like my radiators. LOL I don't like fan blades embedded in the matrix.

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Our dutch friend is having problems because his electric fans aren't man enough, admitted by him as being cheap.

I use a pair of mondeo fans from a car with AC, and then have never struggled cooling my tuned 4.0. They also pull ~20A *each*, and sound like a tornado going by. I suspect on a mondeo, they may have been speed controlled.

Oh, and if you fan wiring melted your fuse rating was too high, or your cable too small!

All very well saying electric fans are carp, but if you fit them badly, don't look after them, use incorrect fuse values, and buy the cheapest nastiest fans you can from ebay, you can expect all sorts of problems.

Same thing with viscous units, fit a nasty BP item and don't expect it to last...

Viscous units have their place, definitely, but there are reasons electric fans are used on most modern cars.

If you want a good electric fan do not buy new, aftermarket, nip down the scrappy with a tape measure and make it fit with the cowling nice and tight, no problems then.

My biggest issue with viscous fans on an engine conversion is firstly whether they fit, and second whether making a massive, deep cowl is even possible or you can serve your time doing something better and at the same time make getting to the front of your engine a lot easier.

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My fault, well partly. I didn't expect the burnt wiring to pass the relay, I've been very lucky when the fan seized it only burnt out the fan wire. Will change the wiring when new fan arrives

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Freelander 1 twin fans fitted the 127 (V8) rad perfick with only a minor trim of the bottom of the plastic. You can grab the small blue relay / control unit from under the bonnet that has a gen-parts version of Bull Bar Cowboy's dual-speed fan relay circuit in it (or they're about £15 on eBlag) for super luxurious operation. I've not heard much good stuff about kenlowes, my kenlowe stat thing didn't survive first contact with water. Fans under ECU control now.

IMG_2951.JPG

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I do like my radiators. LOL I don't like fan blades embedded in the matrix.

I do remember your reasoning, but I have seen several rads on this site and others damaged by electric fans but only one damaged by a viscous fan (yours). There must have been some reason for it's physical failure, a reason that would have equally affected an electric fan.

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Those two point are actually coincident - the reason premium car manufacturers sometimes use electric fans is the same reason many of us are forced into using them on retrofits - alignment or physical space. Most electric fans are used on transverse engines, where engine drive is impractical. Otherwise, it's where an engine driven fan wont fit because of the engine's various pulleys not being in a position suitably behind the rad or we cant find a way of making a suitable shroud. It's not because of reliability, performance or economy. Engine driven fans are superior and electric fans an act of desperation!

Viscous units have their place, definitely, but there are reasons electric fans are used on most modern cars.

...

My biggest issue with viscous fans on an engine conversion is firstly whether they fit, and second whether making a massive, deep cowl is even possible or you can serve your time doing something better and at the same time make getting to the front of your engine a lot easier.

All that said, I heartily agree with the rest of your points. :)

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I hardly see it as desperation, more a viable solution once well engineered . ;)

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