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painting and restoring


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can anyone tell me how i should go about fixing the rust on my doors and sills and then repainting the whole vehicle its a 300tdi station wagon 1997, i would like it to look presentable for work .the condition of it now is not to bad but i would like to do a proper job on it my budget is about 500 pounds . all help would be great thyanks. : :D

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I fully restored a 1987 V8 90 over 2½ years. The easiest method I found, especially if you're planning to keep the motor a while, is to replace the doors. It's not as expensive as you may think. Mine were £135 from Paddocks. The sills are very cheap but I'm surprised they have 'gone' so soon. They are held on by 10mm bolts and come off quite easily (usually!) and they come off if you can reach the bolts with an angle grinder... Could always replace with rock sliders.. Swapping over all the fiddly bits from an old door to a new one is time consuming but not difficult. You'd probably be wise to replace the 'U' shaped 'runners' for the windows. Best to have the new door sprayed up first, put them both on a big table (not the kitchen one..) and move it all over. Spraying I found quite easy the first time, but it helps if you've got some good gear and a sensible paint.. I used something called 'Super Traffic' which is still available if you know where to look and I got a good match with the Landy blue/grey. It was easy to apply and your local automotive paint supplier should be able to advise..

The door frames (that is, the frame of the door, not the recess it closes into) usually rot as well, and if you have 'different metal corrosion' that is, where the steel frame has reacted with the alloy panels, you can't stop it.. It's not like rust, it's a chemical reaction rather than just oxidation. Bubbling paint caused by this was quite a common warranty claim, Land Rover never seem to have totally cured it, although them making the doors out of all steel will probably do it these days. I believe it's also possible to buy door skins, the alloy outer panels, which may be an easier job. The frames were shot on mine so that wasn't an option. I have a shortcut for replacing other panels, such as the seat box end panels. I removed the seat box, drilled through the spot welds using a drill the same size as 'Landy size' pop rivets, took the old panels to a sheet metal workshop (they did ventilation ducting) and got them to make new duplicates and refitted them using pop rivets. Sprayed up you wouldn't know they weren't originals. Cost a darned sight less than a new seat box..

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Guest dew110CSW

Probobly not really suitable for doors, but I just learned of this techique for rust & paint removal: Link Here.

And Taken off another forum I frequent:

Well, I did, and f**k me it's effective :blink:

Read the link to find out how it's done, but a 59p bag of washing soda is the most effective rust remover I've ever seen!

The results...

The one on the left had been fizzing in my electrolysis bath for 6 hours. After a quick clean with a scouring pad it's completely paint and rust free!

IMG_1913.jpg

IMG_1912.jpg

My 'lab'

IMG_1914.jpg

Anyone who wants to clean rust off metal parts should give this a go. You wont believe the results. Just a shame you can't dip a whole car ;)

Thanks to tfm on Barryboys for this.

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