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Crankshaft damper retaining bolt


Kim Horsevad
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Undoing the crankshaft damper retaining bolt on a 200 tdi engine can be really difficult. The bolt is loctited and done to 341nm, which is rather tight...

I was changing the timing belt on a 200 tdi engine in the weekend, and grabbed some pictures with my phone. I have a system for undoing that bolt which might be a little elaborate in setup, but works with 100% succes rate...

(Btw... This bolt was probably tigthed even more than it should. My air "rattle gun" is good for 700nm and refused to undo it!)

To fabricate a "special tool" for undoing such stubborn bolt is rather simple:

The idea is to bolt a piece of flat bar to the damper assembly and then secure this piece of flat bar to the chassis rail with a piece of heavy chain.

First find a suitable piece of flat bar from the scrap pile. The pulley assembly can be used to mark the positions of the bolt holes.The piece shown in the picture is about 10mm thick and 60mm wide.

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Had to use a 1 metre "extension pipe" on the 3/4 inch wrench to undo the bolt!

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Overkill...? - Maybe, but works every time. This system can be used for field repairs too, where one do not have access to air tools. When doing the bolt up, same system can be used, just secure to the other chassis rail.

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Interesting idea Kim.

What bolts did you use to secure the bar? I know they are M8 coarse thread, but did you use normal or hi-tensile?

As chassis rails are pretty-much the same distance apart, couldn't you just use a longer bit of flat bar and do away with the chain?

Les.

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Interesting idea Kim.

What bolts did you use to secure the bar? I know they are M8 coarse thread, but did you use normal or hi-tensile?

As chassis rails are pretty-much the same distance apart, couldn't you just use a longer bit of flat bar and do away with the chain?

Les.

The bolts are 12.9 - not that it should matter much... Even though the bolts are in shear, which (if my memory is correct) is only 60% of the tensile bolt strength, 8.8 bolts should be adequate.

The reason for making the piece of flat bar so short and using a chain for fastening is basicly that it easily fits in the toolbox in the vehicle. Although I have a rather well-equipped workshop I always have a complete toolkit in the landrover - I hate the thought of beeing stranded somewhere without the tools to effect some emergency repair!

I dont know if you can see it in the pictures, but there is a number of other holes drilled in the piece of flat bar - so that it (together with some long 12.9 bolts) can be used as a makeshift puller. The piece of chain is the same chain I use when I rig the Hi-Lift for use as winch.

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