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Transfer Box Oil For Td5 Disco And Defender


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#1 Montgomery

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 04:27 PM

Hi people,

Went away on holiday for two weeks, and my favourite forum had moved. Good luck with whatever's happening. I enjoy this forum, and the people here are informed, informative and helpful. May it long continue in whatever guise. Just don't make it too difficult to find you if you move again! (Because computers aren't my forte).

Anyway, now for my question:

According to my manual, my Defender Td5 takes 75w90 in the transfer box and EP 90 in the differentials. According to someone else's RAVE manual, a Discovery takes 75w90 all round. Why would a Discovery take different oils? Obviously the Discovery's diffs turn quicker per given road speed (smaller tyres). Do the two vehicles genuinely take different oils in the diffs, or has one of us got guff information? If so what's right. (My manual mentions update pages for the fluids section, so maybe I have been updated, and he hasn't?)

Thanks

Montgomery

#2 western

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 04:33 PM

According to my manual, my Defender Td5 takes 75w90 in the transfer box and EP 90 in the differentials. According to someone else's RAVE manual, a Discovery takes 75w90 all round



my RAVE says the same as above. :D
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#3 BogMonster

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 05:43 PM

Everything I know of here uses EPX80w90 or EP90 in t/box and axles, whatever the book says the boxes are the same thing so no reason why it needs to be 75w90 (though that is what mine says too)

It's pretty stone age engineering in there so as long as it's 90-ish and slippery it'll do I think :lol:
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#4 JST

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 07:27 PM

i use EP90 in my '99 td5 axles and t box

#5 rick

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 08:18 PM

and I use 75W-90 GL5 in my Defender t/case and front diff.
(ok, I have a full synth 75W-140 in the rear Sals, but only 'cause I had extra leftover from one of our other vehicles that specs that viscosity)
It's getting down to -5* o/night here pretty regularly atm, and if you've ever seen how thick a straight SAE 90 is at 0*, imagine that trying to get up and into the bearings until things warm up.......
a 75W-90 is much runnier at these temps, with the same viscosity when hot @ 100*C, so it's a bit of a no brainer.
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#6 BogMonster

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 09:12 PM

Personally I reckon a thick oil will remove some of the backlash in the transmission (it is certainly better when cold than when hot, in my 90)

Hmmm ... thinks ... got a drum of Alpha SP320 in the back of a container somewhere I wonder if that would tighten up the transfer box a bit :rolleyes: :lol:
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#7 rick

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Posted 11 August 2005 - 09:20 AM

Hmmm ... thinks ... got a drum of Alpha SP320 in the back of a container somewhere I wonder if that would tighten up the transfer box a bit 


:lol: :lol: :lol:

All jokes aside, I remember seeing a paper comparing a straight SAE 90 with a Synthetic 75W-140 at something like -15*C (not really fair ;) ) which showed that the straight 90 took something like 5 minutes under a certain load/speed to thin enough to splash up to lube the bearings. :o
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