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URGENT, my idler has sheared off?


Countax
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I urgently need some advice.

My wife was driving our 300TDi Disco and was about 3 miles from home when the car swerved left and the alternator light came on. She pulled up safely and called me.

The serpentine belt idler pulley has sheared off at the block. Now i know why this has happened, its because my shim trick to stop the belt squealing has put a stress on the stud and eventually its let go.

But i now need to remove what's left of the stud in the block.

Am i right that this is an opposite from normal thread? if so, then an easy out won't work, but then a normal threaded bolt should. I am wondering if i can simply drill a hole in the stud and wind in a suitable tap ( or is it a die?) to remove the stud. My other worry is the stud might be made of hardened steel.

I also want to recover the car and do the work at home, but 3 miles is a bit too far to drive with no water pump. Can i use an emergency elastic fan belt to just drive the water pump from the crank? What is the pulley below the water pump and does it drive anything important?

Thx,

Nigel

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the bolt holding the tensioner is normal thread the bolt holding the wheel itself is left handed IIRC

pullies are crank/alternator/water pump and tensioner just a belt guide

so an emergency belt to the water pump would suffice.

as for the bolt DO NOT TRY AN EZI OUT they are rubbish and will snap

try tapping the bolt that is left in there with a punch it may well undo

if not purchase a left handed drill bit

as they bite they are good for bring the bolt out with them.

first I'd try a punch

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I urgently need some advice.

My wife was driving our 300TDi Disco and was about 3 miles from home when the car swerved left and the alternator light came on. She pulled up safely and called me.

The serpentine belt idler pulley has sheared off at the block. Now i know why this has happened, its because my shim trick to stop the belt squealing has put a stress on the stud and eventually its let go.

But i now need to remove what's left of the stud in the block.

Am i right that this is an opposite from normal thread? if so, then an easy out won't work, but then a normal threaded bolt should. I am wondering if i can simply drill a hole in the stud and wind in a suitable tap ( or is it a die?) to remove the stud. My other worry is the stud might be made of hardened steel.

I also want to recover the car and do the work at home, but 3 miles is a bit too far to drive with no water pump. Can i use an emergency elastic fan belt to just drive the water pump from the crank? What is the pulley below the water pump and does it drive anything important?

Thx,

Nigel

The stud should not be hardened, you should be OK. I gree with Tony about the threading. I disagree on the Ezi-outs though. Decent quality ones should be OK - up to a point obviously. :) I prefer the ones which are square and knock in rather than the ones which twist in. Left hand drill bits are good though. :)

Chris

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That would take some force to snap the stud Nigel. The remains will be thread locked in, so will make things harder trying to remove it. If there's anythign I can do, give me a shout.

Les. :)

thanks les. The shim has been in for a good 5yrs plus so i guess this is a warning to us that the shim fix has its limitations.

I will give you a shout if i need help.

Nigel

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That would take some force to snap the stud Nigel. The remains will be thread locked in, so will make things harder trying to remove it. If there's anythign I can do, give me a shout.

Les. :)

I managed to fix the disco yesterday. Ended up doing it where the vehicle was left due to no one selling any emergency fan belts in the Swindon area. I needed to buy an adaptor to turn my drill chuck 90 degrees to get access to the broken stud and found a product made by Laser for about £8. Also bought a set of extractor bits and drilled a small hole in the remains of the snapped off stud. Thankfully the part was not thread locked in and it came out easily using the extractor tool. New stud cost less than 90 pence.

I guess its now time to fork out £70 and buy a new tensioner to stop the squealing aux belt problem due to a miss aligned tensioner.

Nigel

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Petrol stations are good for emergency fan belts. :)

Chris

Yep

I drove a Disco with a seazed power steering pump from (Tixover) Corby to Southampton at night with only a petrol station jobby between the water pump and crank. luckily a freind was having a affair :o with a guy in Northampton so I could follow her all the way home with only side lights on :rolleyes: .

very cold very wet drive home but the £3.99 belt got me home if it wasn't a 200tdi I would have been stuffed

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