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PAS pump replacement 200Tdi


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Due to the PAS pump bearings expiring I find myself replacing the PAS pump this week. This is how it goes...

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First job was to get the car up on the ramps so I can work on it without worrying about jacks and the like. Since the wheels can stay on this works well.

post-209-1166710228_thumb.jpg

This is the offending part. I had to cut the belt off at the roadside in order to get home but the belt, if fitted, would come loose as the job progresses so no problem there. I have a piece of wood jammed in between the pulley and the chassis to prevent the pulley (was seized previously) from rotating. It is worth loosening the bolts holding the pulley onto the pump now as it is a nightmare to hold the pulley still when the pump is off the car. I learned this the hard way last time!

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It is also worth loosening but not removing the bolts holding the pump to the adjuster/mounting plate now too.

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Now remove the hose from the back of the pump. It is held (On earlier models) by a banjo-bolt. Mine was loose indicating, IMHO, that the vibration from the duff bearing had caused it to loosen and deposit oil everywhere rather than the front seal in the pump, which appears undamaged, causing the leak. You should have a large bucket or drip tray underneath to catch the inevitable cascade of ATF.

post-209-1166710908_thumb.jpg

With the hose removed from the back it is now safe and sensible to remove the bolts holding the adjustment/mounting plate to the mount.

post-209-1166711130_thumb.jpg

Once all the bolts are out the pump will hang by it's low pressure feed pipe. This is held onto a spigot by a Jubilee type clip. Undo this clip and, prepared once again for an ATF shower, remove the hose from the spigot. The pump can now be removed from the car and the adjuster/mounting plate removed from the pump. Remember that the pump will still be full of ATF so allow it to drain before you take it in to show off to the wife/GF!

I am sure that there is a proper way of emptying the PAS fluid from the system/reservoir/pipes without getting it everywhere. I suspect that the bleed nipple on the PAS box would allow this if it were opened with a hose attached to guide the fluid into a bucket. It is worth using new ATF after renewal of the pump.

Fingers crossed that the carrier gets my pump here in time for me to complete this job before Christmas! :)

Chris

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Putting my forensic hat on, Chris, I'd say that your loose bolt dropped the fluid out of the system and this is what caused the bearing to fail and sieze. Pure speculation but that's the order I'd say it happened on if just presented with those facts...

Nice writeup by the way, more for the Tech Archive I hope!

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Putting my forensic hat on, Chris, I'd say that your loose bolt dropped the fluid out of the system and this is what caused the bearing to fail and sieze. Pure speculation but that's the order I'd say it happened on if just presented with those facts...

Had I not driven for a day and a half including off-roading with perfect steering between the first indication of a problem (The car made a horrid squealing sound the day before) and the final oily demise I would be inclined to agree. Pretty sure that the pump let go before the banjo came loose though.

Chris

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So, Part2, the re-fittening...

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The new pump. Note that it comes with plastic caps on the inlet and outlet. Dirt contamination is the enemy of all hydraulic systems.

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Refit the adjuster/mounting plate, just finger tight is OK as it is best done up after fitting. Refit the low pressure feed pipe with the jubilee clip.

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Refit the assembly to the PAS pump mounting bracket on the engine...

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...and then refit the high pressure pipe with the banjo bolt. This pump came with a new banjo and bolt. I chose to re-use my old banjo, just as well since the 'O' ring on the new banjo bolt turned out to have been pinched.

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Tighten the bolts holding the pump to the adjuster/mounting plate and then re-fit the belt pulley. I found the pulley a very tight fit and had to 'hammer' it on with the rubber handle of a screwdriver. Again, just fit the pulley bolts finger tight for now.

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Fit the new belt and then tension it. Some adjuster plates have a 1/2" square hole to fit a ratchet handle in to allow for tensioning. I have to use a lever, in this case a large screwdriver. Be very careful where you lever as the can around the PAS pump is very thin and easily damaged. While holding the tension on with one hand, tighten the bolts holding the adjuster plate to the mounting bracket.

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One the belt is tight it will hold the PAS pump and pulley still, allowing you to tighten the bolts.

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Re-fill the PAS reservoir with new ATF (DII), start the engine and top up the reservoir until the level stabilises. The instructions I have read suggest that you should turn the steering from lock to lock several times in order to eliminate air from the system. During my test drive it became apparent that the belt will need tensioning again. That will have to wait till the morning!

Job done. :)

Doing the whole job in one hit would take about an hour, perhaps an hour and a half. It took me longer as I did it in two shifts and had to change the alternator belt (twice) in the middle. :)

Hope this helps someone out. :)

Chris

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Due to the PAS pump bearings expiring I find myself replacing the PAS pump this week. This is how it goes...

post-209-1166710087_thumb.jpg

First job was to get the car up on the ramps so I can work on it without worrying about jacks and the like. Since the wheels can stay on this works well.

post-209-1166710228_thumb.jpg

This is the offending part. I had to cut the belt off at the roadside in order to get home but the belt, if fitted, would come loose as the job progresses so no problem there. I have a piece of wood jammed in between the pulley and the chassis to prevent the pulley (was seized previously) from rotating. It is worth loosening the bolts holding the pulley onto the pump now as it is a nightmare to hold the pulley still when the pump is off the car. I learned this the hard way last time!

post-209-1166710520_thumb.jpg

It is also worth loosening but not removing the bolts holding the pump to the adjuster/mounting plate now too.

post-209-1166710668_thumb.jpg

Now remove the hose from the back of the pump. It is held (On earlier models) by a banjo-bolt. Mine was loose indicating, IMHO, that the vibration from the duff bearing had caused it to loosen and deposit oil everywhere rather than the front seal in the pump, which appears undamaged, causing the leak. You should have a large bucket or drip tray underneath to catch the inevitable cascade of ATF.

post-209-1166710908_thumb.jpg

With the hose removed from the back it is now safe and sensible to remove the bolts holding the adjustment/mounting plate to the mount.

post-209-1166711130_thumb.jpg

Once all the bolts are out the pump will hang by it's low pressure feed pipe. This is held onto a spigot by a Jubilee type clip. Undo this clip and, prepared once again for an ATF shower, remove the hose from the spigot. The pump can now be removed from the car and the adjuster/mounting plate removed from the pump. Remember that the pump will still be full of ATF so allow it to drain before you take it in to show off to the wife/GF!

I am sure that there is a proper way of emptying the PAS fluid from the system/reservoir/pipes without getting it everywhere. I suspect that the bleed nipple on the PAS box would allow this if it were opened with a hose attached to guide the fluid into a bucket. It is worth using new ATF after renewal of the pump.

Fingers crossed that the carrier gets my pump here in time for me to complete this job before Christmas! :)

Chris

I'm certain that's my dentist with the spanner in his hand!

Hope he uses a new pair of gloves at my next appointment in January. :):)

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