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engine cut off/out switch?


jameslwt
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Similar to recent winch isolater thread.......

Thinking about an isolator/safety cut out for my 300tdi, but winch is an h14 mech pto. So presumably only way it can be shut off in a hurry is to stop engine. Bur how do I do this?

Is it as simple as a switch in the feed to the fuel solenoid, or is there another way? I know jack about this side of things! :rolleyes:

Cheers

James

Also, anyone else with a mech pto h14 - is the worm box oil filler plug on the side of the winch housing - looks like a grub screw/typical filler plug thingy, above the worm box? And where is the drain plug?!

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Similar to recent winch isolater thread.......

Thinking about an isolator/safety cut out for my 300tdi, but winch is an h14 mech pto. So presumably only way it can be shut off in a hurry is to stop engine. Bur how do I do this?

Is it as simple as a switch in the feed to the fuel solenoid, or is there another way? I know jack about this side of things! :rolleyes:

Cheers

James

Also, anyone else with a mech pto h14 - is the worm box oil filler plug on the side of the winch housing - looks like a grub screw/typical filler plug thingy, above the worm box? And where is the drain plug?!

James,

It should be possible to isolate the winch without cutting the engine. My brother has an ex-national grid 110 fitted with a mechanical capstan winch. There are push stop buttons on the front of the vehicle which kill the winch but allow the engine to run on. Unfortunately I haven't looked into how it's wired in though.

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You could very easily fit an inline switch to the fuel cut-off. It would instantly kill the engine, which would be ideal to abrubtly stop a mech winch. If you fit the switch after the ingintion, then it would all still be controlled by the ignition key, so you wouldn't be increasing the chance of someone finding it easier to swipe your truck.

Les.

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You could very easily fit an inline switch to the fuel cut-off. It would instantly kill the engine, which would be ideal to abrubtly stop a mech winch. If you fit the switch after the ingintion, then it would all still be controlled by the ignition key, so you wouldn't be increasing the chance of someone finding it easier to swipe your truck.

Les.

Cheers Les

Any idea of best switch to use? Or where to get from?

Cheers

James

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I have an ex eleccy board 110 with H14 fitted - there's a cut off switch on the bonnet that only comes into play once the PTO is engaged (stops the drunken stoodents stalling my start to the day) -

I do know there's a switch, bit like a series handbrake type, that the PTO lever pushes against once engaged, this lights a warning light and very loud buzzer (now unplugged!), I presume it also does something to the fuel cut off circuit. I think I have a wiring diagram lying around somewhere, will try and dig it out.

N.

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The switch doesn't have to be particularly large to handle a heavy current drain, so a half decent one would probably be sufficient. Any motor factors would sell something suitable. If you hid the switch somewhere, then it would be an anti-theft device. If you switched it off when you turned the ignition off, then if someone manages to turn the ignition on, they still won't be able to start it.

Les.

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I have an ex eleccy board 110 with H14 fitted - there's a cut off switch on the bonnet that only comes into play once the PTO is engaged (stops the drunken stoodents stalling my start to the day) -

I do know there's a switch, bit like a series handbrake type, that the PTO lever pushes against once engaged, this lights a warning light and very loud buzzer (now unplugged!), I presume it also does something to the fuel cut off circuit. I think I have a wiring diagram lying around somewhere, will try and dig it out.

N.

Cheers Nigel. That would be brilliant.

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The switch doesn't have to be particularly large to handle a heavy current drain, so a half decent one would probably be sufficient. Any motor factors would sell something suitable. If you hid the switch somewhere, then it would be an anti-theft device. If you switched it off when you turned the ignition off, then if someone manages to turn the ignition on, they still won't be able to start it.

Les.

Cheers Les. Any idea, of the top of your head, what the current rating would need to be?

Cheers

James

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We (Coastguard Hat on) used to have a 2.5P 90 with a Capstan winch, we had two of those red plunger switches on the bumper which were together wired in series with the coil supply, so they killed the engine when pressed.

In terms of which switch, I'd want a mechanically latching switch so that when it was switched off, it stayed off. there's not much point having a switch that can be turned on as easily as it can be turned off.

you could either use a (rather bulky, but easy to see) plunger type

EMgroup.JPG

Or, you could use a 'kill-switch' as fitted to powerboats/RIBs etc, usually this requires the driver to wear a lanyard (red string in pic), which if pulled kills the engine. There'd probably be problems with mobility, etc, but the advantage of this method is you don't need to be able to reach the switch, just to yank the end of the lanyard.

kill-cords.jpg

The stop solenoid only needs a very minimal current, somewhere around an amp, at a (don't quote me) guess, it'd be very easy to measure with a multimeter.

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We (Coastguard Hat on) used to have a 2.5P 90 with a Capstan winch, we had two of those red plunger switches on the bumper which were together wired in series with the coil supply, so they killed the engine when pressed.

In terms of which switch, I'd want a mechanically latching switch so that when it was switched off, it stayed off. there's not much point having a switch that can be turned on as easily as it can be turned off.

you could either use a (rather bulky, but easy to see) plunger type

EMgroup.JPG

Or, you could use a 'kill-switch' as fitted to powerboats/RIBs etc, usually this requires the driver to wear a lanyard (red string in pic), which if pulled kills the engine. There'd probably be problems with mobility, etc, but the advantage of this method is you don't need to be able to reach the switch, just to yank the end of the lanyard.

kill-cords.jpg

The stop solenoid only needs a very minimal current, somewhere around an amp, at a (don't quote me) guess, it'd be very easy to measure with a multimeter.

Cheers for that Luke.

I work with boats anyway so had thought of the kill cord. The downside is they work by actually making a circuit, rather than breaking it! (Never looked into it in much more detail - I hate electrics and boats - everythings always corroded together!) But we thought of this for a security switch on the series 3 we use to pull boats around, and it was a PITA!

The plunger type was the thought I had in my head - I will investigate further!

Cheers

James

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