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quick release brake pipes...


Mark
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Does anyone know the legality of using quick release hydraulic type fittings on the brake and clutch lines of a car?

I know this probably sounds suicidal, but I read an peice in a magazine that Goodridge have released a line of pushfit and bayonet fit high pressure fittings, and I wondered if these could be used in the braking system.

I know that industrial hydraulic systems have fittings which allow devices to be connected or disconnected without having to rebleed the system, so, could similar fitting be relied on to work in a braking or clutch system without having to rebleed it?

Do the industrial fittings work on the basis that a little air in thier systems is tolerable? Obviously this would then rule them out for brakes...

The reason being that I would like to make the body on the new truck relatively easy to lift off the chassis. There are only a few links between them, the most hasslesome of which being the hydraulics of the brakes and the clutch...

If there is something in C&U or the SVA/IVA manual that says something along the lines of 'brake lines must be continuous' or the like, then obviously this is a non-starter, but I am curious...

Cheers

Mark

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I can see nothing in the IVA manual that precludes their use. The closest is the line

"A brake pipe or hose must have suitable joint fittings"

If the Goodridge data sheet refers to their use in braking systems then that would fulfil the "suitable".

A couple of catalogues I have refer to a Jiffy-Tite system but say this is not for brake systems. One refers to a Goodridge QD system but the Goodridge catalogue online only has them as a system heading with no detail.

Steve

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Daan, why wouldn't you recommend them? are they prone to failure, or something else?

The truck needs to be fully road legal, and reliable, so reliability and longevity is an issue...

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Nizarrely I was actually playing with one this afternoon at my suppliers!

I think it was Seat that they had developed / imported ( they work closely with a US fitting manufacturer ) and it was a lovely little thing!

Light enough to fit mid hose and dry enough of a break to not need bleeding after reconnecting.....

Price is yet to be set but I would work on no change out of over £100each - I will confirm this and post the answers.....

Out of interest after weeks of threatening to do so I have started to put up some pages on the website of my motorsport side of the business ( actually the main business as 4x4 is my passion not my wages!!! ) Have a look at www.llama4x4.com to see what I am on about and then keep checking over the next days / weeks as more and more pages go on to download

many thanks

David

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I suppose an alternative idea for just removing the body would be to leave the pedal box on the chassis.

Another way would be to have the master cylinder attached to the chassis and a seperable mechanical linkage from it to the pedal. Some cars have the master cylinder on the left and a rotating cross beam connects it to the pedal on the right. You could locate the master cylinder somewhere else and operate it via a set of rods, or a cable if relative movement is a problem.

How about a small hydraulic system like a clutch master/slave cylinder that then operates the brake master cylinder elsewhere. Just separate the slave from the brake master cylinder to break the system.

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  • 2 weeks later...
The clutch lines from a freelander have a "push fit" between master and slave cilinder. So i guess for clutches it is ok, however for brakes, no idea.

Sorry for hi-jacking the thread - am about to fit a new clutch master cylinder and noticed that there is an LR tool advised to separate the push fit connetion. Is it possible to separate the two without the tool and without doing ireparable damage to the slave pipe connector?

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Right I now have prices and details of the little beasties.....

Virtual dry break ( max. 0.1cc fluid loss ) and with a max pressure of 3000psi

Available in steel or aluminium with -3jic ends ( or -4 for clutch size ). The steel ones also have a locking pin to avoid accidental disconnection.

Run away at the price though!!!

Steel £ 192.05 each

Ali £ 285 each.

Both of these prices include vat and postage so please form an orderly queue and phone at 1/2 hour intervals to allow me time to process each order as it comes in :lol::lol:

David

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When rallying many years ago a common mod my farther did was cut all the mounting holes for the brake likes into slots. That way the clamping nut could be undone and the brake line slide off the mount. Although not as quick as a specialist disconnecting fitting, it was a lot quicker than splitting and rebleeding brake lines when changing items like struts that the brake lines clamped onto.

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