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Warn 8074 info


will_warne
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Well, I got hold of an 8074 from ebay and it arrived yesterday. I've started stripping it (sooooo nicely made with no slop and the gearbox spins freely when in freespool) but I could really do with an exploded diagram - particularly of the brake setup. Mine seems to be slightly differant to the other's I've seen in that it has 2 pawls connected together via a rod behind the brake:

41973458_o.jpg

At the moment the whole brake and freespool setup seems incomplete and a bit Heath Robinson so it'd be useful to see a diagram so I can workout exactly how it was supposed to work from the factory before trying to improve it.

I'm also trying to remove the inner brake plate and large gear that sits on the brake shaft from the case to check the condition of the bearing / seal but these don't want to split and I can't obviously see where these come appart. Can anyone help with this?

Also, when you come to locate a splined input gear how have others done it? Drill it and the motor shaft and add a split pin (as it is now)?

The parts list so far includes a few bearings (drum shaft outer case & brake pawl plus one for a new endplate), brake pads, bottom end seals and splined input gear (along with anything needed to get the brake working as it should). Is there anywhere that still keeps parts in stock?

TIA,

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The parts are all impossible to find and hideously expensive, its probably best you sell it to me :lol::ph34r:

The search button is your friend Will ;)

Good try! I'm used to Warn prices and I've learnt its less painful if you don't ask the price. :ph34r:

I tried here and google first - all I came up with was a poor quality diagram for a band brake version.

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Thats as good as you are gonna get I'm afraid

Thread here

I have a belleview and two 8074's and they are all diffrent inside and on the outer face of the casing.

The people you need to speak to for information are Mark, Mr Honniton Hobbit, DirtyDiesel, and Jim at Gigglepin (we had a geeky chat the other day).

I cant help you for spares suppliers except to say buy another winch as a spare. Try to get a belleview s the band brkae makes for easier fitting of a disc brake

Lewis :)

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Thats as good as you are gonna get I'm afraid

Thread here

I have a belleview and two 8074's and they are all diffrent inside and on the outer face of the casing.

The people you need to speak to for information are Mark, Mr Honniton Hobbit, DirtyDiesel, and Jim at Gigglepin (we had a geeky chat the other day).

I cant help you for spares suppliers except to say buy another winch as a spare. Try to get a belleview s the band brkae makes for easier fitting of a disc brake

Lewis :)

Cheers, will fab most of the bits I need, then. Jim was going to be getting a call anyway but I was going to wait until I had stripped it before giving him a call.

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Cheers, will fab most of the bits I need, then

Have you a lathe, miller, tig welder, the ability to cut hardened steel, the ability to cut teeth/gears, the facilities to case harden, and the appropriate skills to perform these operations? If not then you wont be fabbing most of the bits you need. If yes then you have just become my new best friend

Here are some photos of the winches I have if they are any use

Front 8074

SD530835.jpg

SD530834.jpg

Someone has added a bolt and cap to replace the circlip at some point. Also note the position of the barke ratchet pawl, this is engaged only by gravity so I will be fitting a spring to locate it positively

SD530830.jpg

Rear 8074 (ex DD)

Note lack of freespool

SD530841.jpg

The position of the brake ratchet pawl differs from the one above

SD530842.jpg

Conveniently when you pull this lever the pawl dissengages from the ratchet

SD530843.jpg

From this (engaged)

SD530845.jpg

To this

SD530844.jpg

I intend to fit a bowden cable to this to allow a remote freespool from the cab

Oddly your 8074 seems to have both types of brake ratchet pawl fitted, although its not clear in that photo which (if any) parts of the freespool you are missing

If we look at Marks 8074 (sorry Mark for pinching your piccies) it has the same pawl fitted to the lower position on my rear 8074 and your 8074 except it is mounted in the upper position, confusing :huh:

winchbrakeend1s.jpg

My spare/project Belleview

SD530840.jpg

SD530836.jpg

SD530839.jpg

Calling Mr Honiton Hobbit, please shed some light on the matter ;)

Lewis :)

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Yeah, as you say, I've got both pawls - they're connected via a rod that runs behind the back of the inner brake plate. Very strange but it seems to work. I think the winch may have been used as a hoist, perhaps it was an extra safety feature???

There's also an odd bolt with spring mounted on the side of the steel plate (the one the pawls attach to) with one end of the spring sitting in the grove in the top pawl. I've no idea what it does (if anything).

My biggest problem is trying to split the large mainshaft gear and the inner brake plate - they simply don't want to separate! I've pulled the mainshaft and the rest of the brake assembly but I can't see where they split. If I didn't know they had to (to insert sideplate to the casing, bearing/seal and the steal plate that supports the pawls) I'd have said they were one peice of steel - there's no obvious joint and they're not shifting. I spent most of the evening smaking both sides with a dead blow mallet to try and break any corrosion holding them together but no joy as yet. I've left the whole thing wo soak in WD40 and I hope that does something tomorrow. If you know how and where they split I'd be grateful as it'll allow me to concentrate my efforts on a specific area ;)

Lathe and milling machine are fairly easy - I can use both (after a fashion :ph34r: ) and have access all be it a few miles away. TIG is farmed out as is cutting of hardened steel. Gearcutting and heat treating is left to grownups. I might try drilling and tapping the mainshaft myself, though. You've done it, haven't you? Cobolt drill?

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I might try drilling and tapping the mainshaft myself, though. You've done it, haven't you? Cobolt drill?

No, the front winch came like that already. I have done an 8274 shaft but that took a carbide tip drill, you could try hss drill but I believe Mark has already unsuccessfully tried that

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No, the front winch came like that already. I have done an 8274 shaft but that took a carbide tip drill, you could try hss drill but I believe Mark has already unsuccessfully tried that

HSS won't touch it - I tried dressing the end of the shaft with a file to smooth off an imperfection and it did nothing. The other thing I'll have to ensure is that once I've drilled the hole I've actually got a tap that'll cut the thread....

I've had a work with Jim who's answer to the brake / gear problem was soak it in oil and keep working at it. I also took the oppertunity to order some improvments for the 8274... :D

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HSS won't touch it - I tried dressing the end of the shaft with a file to smooth off an imperfection and it did nothing. The other thing I'll have to ensure is that once I've drilled the hole I've actually got a tap that'll cut the thread....

Your options are,

Carbide tap (expensive, and if you buy one please lend it to me :) ),

HSS taps and lots of them - do it in the lathe to keep it central and accept thet you will break a few, if they get stuck in there you can always use the carbide drill to drill them out

HSS taps (this assumes that you have access to a couple of diffrent size crabide drill bits and that the shafts are only case hardened), drill to depth with tapping size then drill first 3-5mm with clearance drill to break through the case hardening, then you can just use HSS taps, problem is that you're losing the first few threads

I've had a word with Jim who's answer to the brake / gear problem was soak it in oil and keep working at it

You had to ring someone for that peice of advice? :o Surely thats common sense

Keep at it dude, and keep me posted on progress if you dont mind :)

Also you may find that a dead-blow wont release it easily as what you really need is a shock, try a sizeable copper mallet or use a press

Lewis :)

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HSS won't touch it - I tried dressing the end of the shaft with a file to smooth off an imperfection and it did nothing. The other thing I'll have to ensure is that once I've drilled the hole I've actually got a tap that'll cut the thread....

I've had a work with Jim who's answer to the brake / gear problem was soak it in oil and keep working at it. I also took the oppertunity to order some improvments for the 8274... :D

I dont know if they are availeble in your part of the world, but both drills and taps can be bought with a high quality coating of titanium nitride. They make really easy work of drilling and tapping in hardened steel. Also handy when cross-drilling the input gear of the LT230 transfer case.

Another way, but much more brutal, (and mostly used as a emegency procedure when out of reach of normal workshop facilities) is to use a masonry drill. It wont be effective in actually drilling the hole, but it will produce so much heat that the hardening will weaken so much ordinary HSS drills and taps can be used. This is - of course - NOT the correct way of doing things, and will - again, of course - weaken the strength of the material.

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Your options are,

Carbide tap (expensive, and if you buy one please lend it to me :) ),

HSS taps and lots of them - do it in the lathe to keep it central and accept thet you will break a few, if they get stuck in there you can always use the carbide drill to drill them out

HSS taps (this assumes that you have access to a couple of diffrent size crabide drill bits and that the shafts are only case hardened), drill to depth with tapping size then drill first 3-5mm with clearance drill to break through the case hardening, then you can just use HSS taps, problem is that you're losing the first few threads

You had to ring someone for that peice of advice? :o Surely thats common sense

Keep at it dude, and keep me posted on progress if you dont mind :)

Also you may find that a dead-blow wont release it easily as what you really need is a shock, try a sizeable copper mallet or use a press

Lewis :)

Well, I'll wait and see with the mainshaft. If I get a Carbide tap I'll certainly lend it to you.

I've had annother go with the brake plate / gear tonight and still no joy (and I was getting pretty brutal). The reason for asking advice is there's no visable joint and no visible key stopping one rotating about the other. If I knew it was impossible I'd say they were a single bit of steel however you couldn't get a bearig, a shim, a seal half a case and a brake pawl support plate in between them :ph34r: I tried heating and applying pressure, heating and shocking, heating and quenching, regular soaks of WD40 and now I'm leaving it in oil for at least 24h to see what happens.

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