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D2 Rear Air Suspension


elmscroft
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Hi All,

I have tried searching the forum, as I suspect this subject has been posted several times, but without luck. So here we go.

We have been using our truck (D2, 2001) regularly, lately, and have noticed it drops fully down after about a week. It drops equally, so I pressume I am looking for something common to both sides. On start up it rises to the correct height. As far as I know the air system has had no maintenance done on it, is this correct?

Any pointers to the dropping problem or maintenance issue would be welcome.

Thanks

Mike

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You say you are using the Discovery regularly and it drops down fully after about a week .

Does this mean it drops a little every day - regardless of usage ?

I think it's very rarely both bags would go down equally - but I suppose it can happen .

You could try testing the bags e.g. spraying them with soapy water and watching out for bubbles .

But if they take a week to go down such a small leak could be very difficult to spot .

Leaks tend to happen where the bag folds over at the bottom - so you would need to have the bags fully extended to do a proper check .

If both sides go down the same amount at the same time it could indicate a leak at the compressor - you could possibly spray some soapy water over the compressor and watch for bubbles .

I have a 2001 td5 which I converted to springs last Feb - the rear end began to go down to the bump stops at random - so I decided that I had enough of the air suspension .

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Hi,

Sorry for the confusion.

The Discovery isn't used regularly and after it has been driven, it takes just over a week to sink right down.

I didn't know if the was a common problem with a particular component, if not I will try your suggestions.

Thanks

Mike

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Just a thought - does the Disco be empty when parked up or does there be weight left in the boot.

I had to change one airbag on mine - for a while before this happened I noticed that if weight was placed in the boot with engine off that side would go down quite quickly sometimes .

If it takes yours a week to go down fully then the leak is very small - and would be difficult to detect .

Do you know how long the airbags have been there ? I see quite a few now who change both airbags after 5 yrs - a leak , even a small one , causes the compressor to work harder and it can then fail adding to the eventual repair cost .

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mine collapsed evenly and it was the compessor failed, it also started going down on one corner and that was air spring. I struggle to understand why it went down quickly and evenly at the rear when the compressor failed because there would appear to be an electrically operated blocking solenoid for each air bag on the system preventing leak out unless the solenoid is operated.

The system is simple, a compressor to a T piece with 2 solenoids, one leading to each air bag.

Thats it! except its computer controlled of course :(

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  • 1 month later...

Hi All,

Tried checking air bags for leaks and nothing found.

Does anyone no are the air bags on there own seperate sealed air supply. ie one bag can go down without effecting the other.

Once in the lock up position, can the bags go down? as ours doesn't seem to, so could it be valve or something else related?

Many Thanks

Mike

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