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Semi OT - Driver hours and tacho regs changing


Mark90
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This document on the VOSA website outlines the drivers hours and tacho regs for goods vehicles.

My understanding is that private non-commercial use is exempt from the regs, pages 16 and 30 show exemption from the EC and UK regs for private non-commercial use.

However on 11th April 2007 the exemption rules are changing, see page 42. And for private non-commercial use...

From: "Vehicles used for the non-commercial carriage of goods and personal use."

To: "Vehicles or combinations of vehicles with a maximum permissible mass not exceeding 7.5 tonnes used for non-commercial carriage of goods."

So basically anyone who tows with a 7.5 tonner is stuffed. Thought this might effect some here who use small trucks to carry or trailer vehicles to events.

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Try arguing that with the man from VOSA at the side of the road.

'Goods' do not have to be things for sale, if they are for sale it would be commercial use and tacho required for over 3.5T. This is specifically taking about transporting things for personal use.

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Not read the whole document but I can't see it affects people who can currently drive a 7.5t on their car license as nothing has changed.

It would however prevent someone with a valid license driving a 12t without a tacho claiming "non commercial"

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That's right up to 7.5T hasn't changed so most people won't be effected.

But many will have a permissible 8.25T train weight allowance, C1+E I think, and they may fall foul of the 7.5T limit.

Also turn up to many motorsport events and you will see plenty of people turning up with class 2 vehicles who may not be running on tachos.

For those who don't want to read the whole document (there is no need) the changes are summaried here, and teh change to private use exemption is about half way down.

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But many will have a permissible 8.25T train weight allowance, C1+E I think, and they may fall foul of the 7.5T limit.

Part of a frequent disagreement between me and my wife.

We used to have a "Hobby" caravan. Officially too wide to tow with the Land Rover, alhough it was totally (and frequently ;) ) capable. However legally towable with the horsebox (different width restriction over 3.5t) but stupidly long and slow.

My opinion was I can tow anything I like with the horsebox as long as the train weight is less than 8.25t. Her opinion was I could only tow 750kg.

A bit academic really as the horsebox does not actually have a towbar on it!

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My opinion was I can tow anything I like with the horsebox as long as the train weight is less than 8.25t. Her opinion was I could only tow 750kg.

A bit academic really as the horsebox does not actually have a towbar on it!

She was correct. It is about the maximum allowable mass, MAM. So an unalden 7.5 tonner at, say, 4 tonnes may only tow a trailer with a MAM of 750kg - on a car licence issued before 1997 or whenever it was. The MAM of the vehicle AND trailer may not exceed 8,250kg.

Chris

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Looked into this Chris, after we were talking the other day, Re the 7.5 ton horsebox, towing the Hybrid !!

this is what i found, to go to 12 tonnes MAM, all you need is a C1+E ???

taken from HERE

Drivers who hold subcategory C1+E - limited to 8.25 tonnes MAM, may apply for provisional entitlement to the new subcategory C1+E, in order to take and pass the test which will increase their combined vehicle and trailer entitlement to 12 tonnes MAM. It is not necessary to gain subcategory C1 entitlement first but drivers have to meet higher medical standards, and pass both the category C theory test and the subcategory C1+E practical test.

gone on then,, tell me i am wrong :unsure: as i only did a quick search !!!

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I reckon you are right Tim.

Also the MAM (or gross weight) of the trailer must be less than the unladen weight of the towing vehicle.

Looking at my license note 107 next to C1+E must be the restriction to 8.25T. Need a test to get the full 12T C1+E.

Yep just checked 107 = not more than 8250kg from here

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I already have "C1E" on my licence.

Came free with the "B" pass in a Fiesta in 1991 !

It's not hard to understand why things changed in '94. It is a bit silly passing your test in a mini then being licenced for 7.5T.

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It all seems hideously complicated. As far as I am concerned, my driving licence says that I have to wear my glasses and that there is a 8,250kg weight limit which I take to refer to the MAM.

Apparently there is no weight limit on my D1E category though.

D1 Minibuses 21 Vehicles with between 9 and 16 passenger seats with a trailer up to 750 kg. See also under B

D1+E Minibuses with trailers 21 Combinations of vehicles where the towing vehicle is in subcategory D1 and its trailer has a MAM of over 750 kg, provided that the MAM of the combination thus formed does not exceed 12000 kg, and the MAM of the trailer does not exceed the unladen mass of the towing vehicle.

The above would suggest that I could drive a small coach (or a lorry with extra seats?) with trailer upto 12000kg MAM. Not for hire or reward though.

Chris

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