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109 3/4t Roll Call


minivin
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  • 2 months later...
yes, only place it will be, don't fancy slipping on one trying to get the spare wheel off and slashing myself on the number plate support :unsure:

Too right Rob. I also find chequerplate on the bonnet handy when I end up standing on it to refit the hood along the top of the screen.

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A few years back i used to own 48GT28, which was (looking like yours) a 109" soft top 12v CL (civilian spec) rover.

it was DPM paint, but every other aspect was civilian, even down to the little touches like a rotten chassis!

I sold it to my sisters (then) boyfriend. i think it got scrapped after a while.

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There seems to be this logic that chequerplate is less skiddy than anything else, I find its actually worse, those little raised bits don't act as non-slip quite the reverse they reduce the friction surface with your shoe. Also it soon gets a slimy algae-layer on it which is lethal when wet. If you want non-slip then paint the surface with an aggregate paint such as they use on aircraft wing-walkways.

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A few years back i used to own 48GT28, which was (looking like yours) a 109" soft top 12v CL (civilian spec) rover.

it was DPM paint, but every other aspect was civilian, even down to the little touches like a rotten chassis!

I sold it to my sisters (then) boyfriend. i think it got scrapped after a while.

it's not just the civilian spec that have rotten chassis, this one had a rear cross member that was ready to fall off ;)

There seems to be this logic that chequerplate is less skiddy than anything else, I find its actually worse, those little raised bits don't act as non-slip quite the reverse they reduce the friction surface with your shoe. Also it soon gets a slimy algae-layer on it which is lethal when wet. If you want non-slip then paint the surface with an aggregate paint such as they use on aircraft wing-walkways.

there are arguements either way, but one arguement which is also comparable to tyre design is that a flat surface develops a layer of water in wet conditions that does not easily part when you want another object to touch it ie shoe. However a surface with "lumps" means that most water being able to be pushed into the troughs when another item is put on it, hence why a tyre with knobbles does not suffer from as much aqua-planing unlike a slick tyre :)

algae will develop were ever it likes, MIL paint certainly doesn't stop it's development as my bumperettes had a nice layer when I first purchased the "shed" ;)

non-slip paint is only paint-on sand paper, sand papering my arse when ever I walk past it does not quite enfuse me with the idea of slapping it on :lol:

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  • 1 month later...

Mine's a CL as well. Took us a while to work out what it was. Can't find the military number right now in my well organised student bedroom. :blink:

Not done an awful lot to the old girl. Chassis is solid but the bulkhead's on its way out. Got some defender seats for a bit of comfort. And I did have to swap the engine after overheating the old one! <_<

When I bought her I was really looking for a short wheelbase but the extra inches have been very useful and I think 109s just look right. :D

Matt

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