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300 Tdi Rattle


Paddy_SP
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My 300 Tdi D1 has been making an awful 'brick loose in the sump' type of noise for some time. It's not consistent - that is it comes and goes every few seconds. It's been getting worse, but try as I might, I cannot find the source. Yesterday I pulled the rocker cover off and checked the valve shims and clearances. All the shims were fine, but the tappets needed tightening a little. I didn't expect this to cure the problem, and needless to say it didn't.

Today, I therefore set out on a different course of action - I checked the crank bolt was tight and then removed the serpentine belt, at which point the noise disappeared. So - it's one of four possible things:

1) The belt tensioner (relatively new BM item, but the bearing feels a bit loose)

2) The water pump (relatively new BM item, but feels fine)

3) The alternator (unknown age, but feels fine)

4) The viscous fan pulley (unknown age, but feels fine - the fan has been removed from it for some years)

As soon as I refitted the belt, the noise was back. I've done the screwdriver to the ear test which suggests that it's probably either the water pump or alternator as the bearings in the tensioner and fan pulley were quiet.

So - my question is this - has anyone here ever experienced a loud 'brick loose in the sump' type of noise from either of these items? I'd have expected to hear the usual high-pitched squealing sound, but it's nothing like that!

As ever, any help would be much appreciated...

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Lumpy Norman of this parish had a terrible grinding noise coming from the 300tdi in his Discovery, which turned out to be the water pump impeller cutting it's way through the front casting.

It was a new pump we'd fitted only a few weeks before.

I don't recall what make the pump was (but it was probably Britpart!), but it felt ok and wasnt leaking at all.

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Thanks - I've ordered a new OEM water pump together with a 'P' gasket, as well as an FAG 6203-2RS bearing in case it turns out to be the tensioner rattling. I've got a s/h alternator sitting on my parts shelf, so if it's that I can do something about it. Fingers crossed that I can sort this out once and for all!

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The other bearing that could be suspect is the "non-replaceable" fan shaft bearing in the timing case cover. I have replaced mine with two taper roller bearings but it's a time consuming task but ultimately far less expensive than a brand new timing case cover.

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The other bearing that could be suspect is the "non-replaceable" fan shaft bearing in the timing case cover. I have replaced mine with two taper roller bearings but it's a time consuming task but ultimately far less expensive than a brand new timing case cover.

Yes, I agree that it could be the culprit, but the screwdriver-to-ear test suggests that it's fine - I'm fully prepared to eat my words, however! Fortunately, I have a reasonably well-equipped machine-shop, so I should be able to do as you did and knock up an alternative bearing mount. Fingers crossed that it doesn't come to that though!

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Sadly there is a fifth thing which is that the keyway has worn on the crank or crank pulley and the noise you can hear is the pulley clanking back and forth on the keyway. Depending on what's worn, it could be v v v f expensive (new crank) or you might get away with a new pulley, new key and lots of Loctite. You'd have to take the pulley off to be sure.

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If it's the crank woodruff keyway and from bitter experience I hope it isn't, if you need to get a new crank, have you machine shop mill a single keyway to replace both the woodruff keys, I did this with my new crank and I sleep a lot easier .

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Just thinking Paddy, if it is the harmonic balancer (HB) woodruff keyway that's gone - as in worn in the crank -- and you have a decent machine shop there is no reason why you couldn't weld up the damaged woodruff keyway, machine it back on a lathe and then, using the location of the timing cog woodruff keyway as your mark, cut a single keyway in the crank.

The woodruff key only engages about 60% of the female keyway in the timing cog and even less in the HB while a single full keyway will engage 100% of the slots in both. While the view that it is the crankshaft bolt and the friction that it applies to the face of the HB that retains the HB while the woodruff key is there simply for location, the fact that the keyway prevents rotation cannot be argued. Land Rover should have done this in the first place.

I would have done this to my old crank but the crankshaft bolt had torn out all the threads -- which was why the HB had self destructed and ripped the woodruff keyway to shreds -- and I wasn't happy about having it tapped and a Helicoil inserted to replace the original thread, however if money had been an issue at the time, or if a new crank had not been so easily available, this is the route that I would have taken.

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