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1 Ton Shackles a couple of questions please.


mudmuncher
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Hi All

I have been reading a few posts about 1 ton shackles (done my searches ;) ) but i have a couple of questions still.

I want to raise the overal height of the front and back i have parabolics and fairly big wheels but need a bit more for off roading.

Question is do i ,

Replace EVERY shackle with 1 ton ones ??? eg front and rear of front springs and front and rear of rear springs.

The only reason i ask this as i have seen in other post some people only do front of front springs and rear or rear springs

Why is this ???

Also do i need to change any other parts ??

Many thanks chris

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Hi All

I have been reading a few posts about 1 ton shackles (done my searches ;) ) but i have a couple of questions still.

I want to raise the overal height of the front and back i have parabolics and fairly big wheels but need a bit more for off roading.

Question is do i ,

Replace EVERY shackle with 1 ton ones ??? eg front and rear of front springs and front and rear of rear springs.

The only reason i ask this as i have seen in other post some people only do front of front springs and rear or rear springs

Why is this ???

Also do i need to change any other parts ??

Many thanks chris

There aren't any shackles on the front of landrover springs, just brackets welded to the chassis.

On the 1 Ton chassis these brackets have two holes, so when a longer shackle is used at the rear of the spring the lower hole is used at the front, this ensures front and rear are raised evenly, thus maintaining the diff angle.

If you just fit a longer shackle to the rear of a spring the diff nose will tend to point upwards, this can be compensated for by using wedges between the spring pad on the axle and spring.

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There aren't any shackles on the front of landrover springs, just brackets welded to the chassis.

On the 1 Ton chassis these brackets have two holes, so when a longer shackle is used at the rear of the spring the lower hole is used at the front, this ensures front and rear are raised evenly, thus maintaining the diff angle.

If you just fit a longer shackle to the rear of a spring the diff nose will tend to point upwards, this can be compensated for by using wedges between the spring pad on the axle and spring.

Opps sorry i didnt put my brain in to gear before i posted.

I have just checked my chassis brackets and they dont have 2 sets of holes only 1 set does this mean i dont have a 1 ton chassis and therefor adding the 1 ton shackles to the back of the springs wont work ? !!!

Cheers chris

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Opps sorry i didnt put my brain in to gear before i posted.

I have just checked my chassis brackets and they dont have 2 sets of holes only 1 set does this mean i dont have a 1 ton chassis and therefor adding the 1 ton shackles to the back of the springs wont work ? !!!

Cheers chris

It may be OK, but could lead to propshaft problems if you don't use wedges. Also just lifting one end of the spring will not give as much lift as doing both.

Another point is that the 1 ton chassis has a modified cross-member to the rear of the gearbox to give more clearance to the rear prop.

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I take it we are talking about a 109, yes? As per above, adding the 1 ton shackles will not give you much in the way of lift, but it may be enough. On a 109, the angles may not be severe enough to require degree wedges to adjust pinion angle and mitigate propshaft vibration - maybe. More importantly, you don't want more lift. Lift is very Eighties. What you should do is get out the measuring tape and dremel and trim your wheel arches. Better to keep the CoG lower and focus more on an effective stuff. You want to be balanced and more lift will not help in that respect.

Matt Browne, Overland Engineering in Maine, just reworked some of the suspension geometry on the Tonka, moved the damper mounts and replaced the Revolver shackles with fabbed shackles about 1" shorter than 1 ton. This has improved stability in off camber situations and, with front and rear lockers, I don't need super long articulation. You won't be able to get 36" tyres on your rig (half shaft issues aside) because of the portal effect, but this is pretty well set up:

P62206111.jpg

P62206101.jpg

P62206121.jpg

P62206131.jpg

IMG_2050.jpg

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Wow impressive Series Land Rover I like it.

Is it on parabolics or something else ?

What engine is it running on ?

Any lockers ?

What tyre size do you have on those strange wheels ?

Sorry about all the questions.

ps watch out you dont knock Ross Kemp over. :rolleyes:

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Wow impressive Series Land Rover I like it.

Is it on parabolics or something else ?

What engine is it running on ?

Any lockers ?

What tyre size do you have on those strange wheels ?

Sorry about all the questions.

ps watch out you dont knock Ross Kemp over. :rolleyes:

If you actually read the last post all your questions are answered there.....!!! :ph34r:

All there for you VVvvvVV

just reworked some of the suspension geometry on the Tonka, moved the damper mounts and replaced the Revolver shackles with fabbed shackles about 1" shorter than 1 ton. This has improved stability in off camber situations and, with front and rear lockers, I don't need super long articulation. You won't be able to get 36" tyres on your rig (half shaft issues aside) because of the portal effect, but this is pretty well set up:

"The Tonka" - SIII 88" portal axle, parabolic and revolver sprung, V8, leaks and squeaks & '99 Disco I, 4.0,

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... although it's about 21" too short :P

Only sometimes!

The short wheelbase does drive me round the bend on rockclimbs, but out in the woods in New England, that 89.5" wheelbase is extremely helpful.

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  • 3 weeks later...
There aren't any shackles on the front of landrover springs, just brackets welded to the chassis.

On the 1 Ton chassis these brackets have two holes, so when a longer shackle is used at the rear of the spring the lower hole is used at the front, this ensures front and rear are raised evenly, thus maintaining the diff angle.

If you just fit a longer shackle to the rear of a spring the diff nose will tend to point upwards, this can be compensated for by using wedges between the spring pad on the axle and spring.

Diff nose goes down on the front, I had wdges made up for my Series 1 V8 but the prop gets very tight on the engine cross member. not sure what it is like on a 88" or bigger.

Marc.

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