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Possible Discovery2 Td5 Issues with Engine & Transmission?


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Hi all

I'm hoping to get answers to 2 issues I might be having with my D2. It's been a month now since I've had my D2 Td5, and it goes like a bomb.

Issue #1

I've started noticing (mostly in traffic) that when I take my foot off the accelerator, the engine doesn't idle smoothly, it kinda goes into a 'staccato' pattern, and then eventually smooths out into a normal idle.

Is this normal, or is there something wrong with the firing sequence?

Issue #2

Also, on a steep incline coming out of the basement parking this weekend, I had to stop to wait for another car to clear the exit. When I took my foot off the brake, I was expecting it to crawl up, but it just couldn't and went backwards.

Is that normal or is the transmission fubar?

any opinions would be much appreciated, thanks :)

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Hi,

I afraid I dont have any answers to your questions, but i am experiencing similar issues.

I've had my Disco TD5 Auto for approx 3 months. I've been 'testing' various scenarios and have mixed results. When on a slight incline, sometimes the car will hold itself, sometimes it will just roll back as if it's in neutral and another occasion it began to hold and then all of a sudden let go and i started rolling backwards! :huh:

I have also noticed more often than not that when coming back on to the accelrator after going around a corner, it's as if it's in neutral and takes around a second or so to engage a gear. Highly frustrating!

Everyone I have spoken to who have owned/driven an auto (allbeit not a Discovery) say all they did was just sit on the brake and then quickly switch to the accelerator. I cant seem to do this though because if its not in gear i will roll back, enough to squash the car behind me!

I guess im looking for similar sort of answers. Is this normal behaviour for a Auto Discovery TD5?

I dont seem to have any occurence of issue 1 you mention though.

Cheers, Rich

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#1 is normal

#2 - do you mean it won't crawl up at idle, or won't at all when you press the throttle? First would be normal, second wouldn't

Hi BogMonster,

If on an incline, does yours hold you? If yours is the same, then when you take your foot off the brake it would roll backwards? Do you just accommodate for this i.e. handbrake?

Thanks.

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#1 is normal

ok, cool.

#2 - do you mean it won't crawl up at idle, or won't at all when you press the throttle? First would be normal, second wouldn't

no, I meant at idle. Basically I was at the top of the incline, and took my foot off the brake pedal and was expecting the car to crawl forward, like my gf's Ausi A3 TDi does, but the Disco just rolled back. scared me a bit, thank goodness there weren't any neighbours behind me! :o

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In case you didn't notice a Discovery 2 is aprox 1 tonne heavier than an Audi A3, which is 1 tonne more to drag you back on an incline. Whereas the amount of torque both engines and torque converters can deliver to the wheels on idle is not that much different. It's all about physics and knowing how an auto box works.

As for how you start from a steep incline, there are three ways:

- the driving school (and recommended) way: use the hand brake, accelerate the engine a little bit until you feel the vehicle wants to move forward and release the parking brake (be prepared to use the hand brake again if something goes wrong)

- the experienced driver way: shift your right foot in a fraction of a second from brake to accelerator pedal and just drive :)

- the american way: use left foot on the brake to keep the vehicle steady, right foot to accelerate a bit, release brake pedal and away you go.

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As for how you start from a steep incline, there are three ways:

- the driving school (and recommended) way: use the hand brake, accelerate the engine a little bit until you feel the vehicle wants to move forward and release the parking brake (be prepared to use the hand brake again if something goes wrong)

- the experienced driver way: shift your right foot in a fraction of a second from brake to accelerator pedal and just drive :)

- the american way: use left foot on the brake to keep the vehicle steady, right foot to accelerate a bit, release brake pedal and away you go.

Thanks for that.

I know the 'driving school' way is to use the handbrake and i also know (from driving many automatics in the past) the experienced way is to quickly switch pedals. In my situation though, when i take my foot off the brake on to the accelerator, the car immediately starts to move backwards as if it's in neutral and, because it's in neutral, takes a second or so to engage gear, meaning I have just driven in to the car behind me. :o

It doesnt happen everytime. Even on the same incline (a slight incline at that!) the car behaves differently each time.

Thanks for your reply though. ;)

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Whereas the amount of torque both engines and torque converters can deliver to the wheels on idle is not that much different.

ah, I assumed that the torque converter on the D2 was designed to hold it on an incline :lol:

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The experienced driver way involves a trick. The trick is to shift your foot from the brake pedal to the accel pedal. That is not to lift the foot from the brake pedal, move it to the right then push the foot down until you find the accel pedal, but to slide the right foot while keeping the brake pedal pressed, keeping constant pressure, until the foot will drop off the brake pedal onto the accel pedal.

ah, I assumed that the torque converter on the D2 was designed to hold it on an incline :lol:

May I laugh too?

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The experienced driver way involves a trick. The trick is to shift your foot from the brake pedal to the accel pedal. That is not to lift the foot from the brake pedal, move it to the right then push the foot down until you find the accel pedal, but to slide the right foot while keeping the brake pedal pressed, keeping constant pressure, until the foot will drop off the brake pedal onto the accel pedal.

Ok, that would normally work, but say i slide my foot across the brake, applying constant pressure, until my foot drops off the brake pedal onto the accelerator pedal. I would now only have my foot on the accelerator pedal, waiting for the car to engage a gear. I would still be rolling backwards until a gear is engaged. Would this happen in yours?

Btw im not trying to sound sarcastic. Its the only way i can think to put it.

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"The gear" is already engaged. It's engaged all the time while the stick is in 'Drive' or other forward/rear moving positions. It will take a small amount of time but normally isn't much of a problem. On a a steep incline with enough grip you should be able to move forward without reversing more than 10-12 inches, say 20 at the most.

On the other hand, the driver behind you shouldn't stop too close to you on an incline.

Your duty would be to look in the mirror and check who's behind you and how close. If someone's too close to you then use the handbrake to be safe.

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Hi BogMonster,

If on an incline, does yours hold you? If yours is the same, then when you take your foot off the brake it would roll backwards? Do you just accommodate for this i.e. handbrake?

Thanks.

Mine will roll backwards on anything but a gentle incline, but I have never had a problem crashing into people. Then again I don't even use the handbrake for hill starts in a manual vehicle unless the hill is over about 30 degrees so I suppose I am probably better than most people at hill starts...

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Left foot braking is the answer to this and many other problems. It just takes a bit of practice to get rid of the "clutch" mentality in your left foot so you stop putting everyone through the windscreen when you brake. I do it by second nature these days and often don't even realise I'm doing it both on and off road.

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Issue #1

I've started noticing (mostly in traffic) that when I take my foot off the accelerator, the engine doesn't idle smoothly, it kinda goes into a 'staccato' pattern, and then eventually smooths out into a normal idle.

follow-up question - if this is normal, why does it happen? Anyone know the technical explanation?

The only other diesel I drive is SWAMBO's A3, and it doesn't do that. You lift off the accelerator, and the revs drop to a smooth idle straight away. Granted, it's a 2007 model and way less tractor-like :rolleyes:

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