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As the front end of my Defender project nears completion, I need to sort out a couple of things:

There's a sort of 'guide plate' (I don't know the correct term) for the track rod which bolts to the diff housing. What is this meant to do? I've fitted a heavy-duty track rod which is much thicker than the standard item. Consequently, there's very little clearance for the guide plate. I'm therefore wondering if the plate needs to be fitted?

I've fitted +2" springs & dampers as well as castor-correction radius arms, etc. This leaves me wondering what length bump stops I need... As it'll be some time before the bodywork is fitted, I don't know how to go about determining what's required. I guess one way would be if I were to use some HD ratchet tie-downs to see how far the springs will compress. Any other suggestions?

As ever, any help would be much appreciated! :)

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As the front end of my Defender project nears completion, I need to sort out a couple of things:

There's a sort of 'guide plate' (I don't know the correct term) for the track rod which bolts to the diff housing. What is this meant to do? I've fitted a heavy-duty track rod which is much thicker than the standard item. Consequently, there's very little clearance for the guide plate. I'm therefore wondering if the plate needs to be fitted?

I've fitted +2" springs & dampers as well as castor-correction radius arms, etc. This leaves me wondering what length bump stops I need... As it'll be some time before the bodywork is fitted, I don't know how to go about determining what's required. I guess one way would be if I were to use some HD ratchet tie-downs to see how far the springs will compress. Any other suggestions?

As ever, any help would be much appreciated! :)

The "guide plate", as you call it, is supposed to act as a track rod guard!!! However, it doesn't do a very good job and the track rod often gets bent and then you have a tight spot when the bend passes through the guard. If you're only doing light off raoding you'll probably get away with leaving it on. If you're doing anything serious take it off and think about a proper steering guard.

Regarding your suspension lift, I'm no expert but I'd have thought you could leave the standard height bump stops on. Otherwise what's the point of lifted suspension? However, if you shock absorbers, or any othe part of the suspension, bind up before the axle hits the bump stops, then you'd need extended bump stops to prevent suspension damage. Hopefully someone else who knows what they're talking about will come along soon to either confirm what I'm saying or tell you that I'm talking through an orifice, :ph34r:

HTH.

Mark

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Mark - many thanks for your helpful comments. Although I'm very experienced with competition vehicles, the only time they went off-road was when something had gone badly wrong... Consequently, I'm most grateful for any advice from the seasoned experts on here! :)

Oh, and I have several guards underneath, so couldn't see the need for the 'guide plate'!

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The "guide plate", as you call it, is supposed to act as a track rod guard!!!

Rather than being a guard, it's actually to stop the track rod bending under compression under certain circumstances of steering when off road - the standard item isn't very strong.

Same as Ralph, I just took mine off.

Bump stops will depend on what size tyres you're running. With a 2" lift and 255/85s, mine's fine with the standard bump stops.

I wouldn't compress the springs with ratchet straps, as you won't be able to release them without injury.

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the bump stops really depend on the shocks rather than the lift. If your running standard shocks you can keep the stock bumpstops. If your running say +2" shocks, then you will need to extend the bump stops to stop the shock bottoming out.

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the bump stops really depend on the shocks rather than the lift. If your running standard shocks you can keep the stock bumpstops. If your running say +2" shocks, then you will need to extend the bump stops to stop the shock bottoming out.

Many thanks for your thoughts - I am running +2" shocks...

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