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Should I stay clear?


jimmy86
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Hi All,

I am looking at purchasing my first freelander after a few years away from Land Rovers.

I have just gone back to uni after a few years working so budget is tight, just need something that should last 18months or so, no more than 15000miles I would have thought.

I have seen a 2000 1.8. It has had a lot of work done to it in the last few years and was wondering if you thought I should be concerned about it. It has a full service history and 6 months mot with no advisories. It has covered 79K but approx 15K ago it had a brand new land rover engine put it by a land over specialist. At the same time it had new I.R.D, gearbox clutch and release bearing, viscous coupling and propshaft bearings and finally exhaust system from manifold on including catalytic converter.

All paperwork in present to support this work.

These seems like a lot of work to me and the price the guy wants for the car is reasonable. Do you think I should be reassured or concerned by this?

Also do you think the new engine will have one of the mulitlayered head gaskets?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Thanks,
James

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From my expensive hard lesson learnt experience, Don't go near any Freelander with the words 1.8 petrol in the ad! If you really want a Freelander get a slightly older 2.0 TDi, And make sure it is still a full time 4x4. Otherwise get a discovery.

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That was the impression I was under too. If they are done properly and the engine hasn't got other issues too then they can last anything from 100 miles 80000 miles, also depends on the type of use it has.

The engine mods only prolong the life a little longer.

I have had 3 Freelanders. Never again.

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My 1.8 was brilliant, if it's a good one with a new genuine engine and you keep an eye on it etc. it should be a great little car. The whole discussion of common issues, what to look for when buying, etc. has been covered numerous times here before if you look back through the forum.

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Thanks for the advice guys. Sounds like you have had a bit of a nightmare CJ1!

Have been doing lots of reading up, there seems to be more negative stuff that positive but then again I suppose people are more likely to be negative.

I think in conclusion I am still going to go for it. As long as I look after it and make sure I get people that know what they are doing to do any work that may need done I think it should be a fine little car for a 18months.

I'll keep you posted as to how things go!

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Never had a a petrol one and TBH I wouldn't go near one, even tho I've done loads of head gaskets before. I've had L series and TD4's and they are great as long as you don't mind fixing the silly little problems that they get. L series will be pre 2001MY and so are more likely to have VCU/IRD problems, they have timing belts which cost an absolute fortune if they snap (from experience). TD4's are more sophisticated, being a common rail, but they are by far the best and most refined.

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Well just back from looking at that 1.8 and it was an absolute heap. Not a bit how the seller had described it so walked away. Could see it being a money pit.

Think diesel might be the way forward. Obviously to fit budget will be looking at higher mileages than the 1.8s? What do you guys consider a reasonable mileage for a 2000?

Seen a couple that could be affordable with just shy of 100k on the clock. What are people's thought's? Obviously will be checking for service history and hg, timing belt and viscous coupling.

Cheers,

James

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i sold my 1998 2.0 L series freelander a couple of years ago with 157.000 miles on the clock, i still see it about as the new owner lives local

2 years ago a bought a 2005 td4 which has now covered 112.000 miles

no real problems with either of them , although a few tit jobs every now and then

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Right so 2.0 l series looks like it might be the one to go for. I do a fair bit of motorway driving too so could be better dor that.

Seen 2 with full service history and just less than 100k on the clock that are within budget.

Is the vcu replaced as standard during the service schedule? Although you say there tends not to be a problem with hg on diesels is there a recommend point to change them?

Thanks for alk the helo guys!

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Right so 2.0 l series looks like it might be the one to go for. I do a fair bit of motorway driving too so could be better dor that.

Seen 2 with full service history and just less than 100k on the clock that are within budget.

Is the vcu replaced as standard during the service schedule? Although you say there tends not to be a problem with hg on diesels is there a recommend point to change them?

Thanks for alk the helo guys!

No to both. The VCU is relatively expensive and is normally only changed when it has failed. The big problem is that it is not obvious that it has failed and it doesn't 'fail safe' i.e. it locks up and causes wind up in the transmission. Head gaskets are also normally only replaced if they fail. Most normal engines (not K series) will go their whole life without needing replaced.

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Buy a VCU from Bell Engineering with genuine support bearings pressed on ready to go, not that expensive and makes the job much nicer.

Head gaskets are generally left alone unless they fail, but you may want to check timing belt intervals if the engine has one (TD4 is chain, dunno about the 2.0)as those ARE a service item, often expensive and often neglected, but can scrap an engine if they let go.

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No to both. The VCU is relatively expensive and is normally only changed when it has failed. The big problem is that it is not obvious that it has failed and it doesn't 'fail safe' i.e. it locks up and causes wind up in the transmission. Head gaskets are also normally only replaced if they fail. Most normal engines (not K series) will go their whole life without needing replaced.

VCU failing/failed will feel like a normal land rover driven with the difflock on, on tarmac.

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