Jump to content

Rear cross member replacement


LS26
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

Been trawling through the posts all night, but can't find one that deals with this (if there is one - could you direct me please?)

I am soon going to replace the rear cross member - the one that runs between the goal posts - and my questions are as follows:

What is the best way to support the body while I cut out the old one?

Will the whole thing twang out of shape if I don't weld/bolt some bracketry on it?

What I am thinking of is a piece of 4x2 tack-welded a couple of inches above the X-member from side to side, then this held with a couple of bits of 2" box to the chassis to stop the whole thing from sagging/twisting - or am I WAY over the top?

Pics of a solution would be nice....

Cheers,

Roger (Only 42 more perforations to weldpatch and THEN for that MoT :) ).

Oh - BTW I am away in Scotland on a playday with my nephew and brother-in-law in their series LRs this weekend so I won't be checking this for until Sunday. Didn't want you thinking I am being ignorant if you reply :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Goal posts? :huh:

Can't hurt to tack something across nearby just in case, doubt you'd need anything big - a piece of 1" box is the favourite around the lab.

Thanks for the reply - I happen to have a piece of 4x2 box that's the right length so I'll use that anyway..

Wish me luck ;-)

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i would brace it within something simple to stop it flexing.

it will slightly go out of shape, but not much ( i.e. millimeters ). the roof does a very good job of holding the body in place.

Thanks for that. Very reassuring - I must admit I was getting a bit worried... I met a chap at the weekend who had a local blacksmith weld up his chasis (I didn't ask which bit) and he says that now if he opens the pasenger door he can't close it!

Rog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i managed to chop this out:

day04-wingout03.jpg

and put another back in and the door still managed to open and shut . . . admittedlyslightly stiffer, but it still worked fine:

day05-weld11Custom.jpg

to get the donor part, i cut the whole rear quarter off a RRC cut through the back pillar about 3" above the body line and C-pillar at the door, cut through the rear cross member at the back and also through the floor under the seats.

When I did this, the part of the back pillar that was staying on the car dropped just a few millimeters.

so they stay together pretty well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i managed to chop this out:

(CUT&SHUT)

When I did this, the part of the back pillar that was staying on the car dropped just a few millimeters.

so they stay together pretty well.

I am always impressed by how much people will tackle on Land Rovers & Ranger Rovers - Well done for taking it on (in what looks like a domestic setting too) It sounds like it turned out fine. Any pics of the 'after'?

Rog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rog,

I replaced my crossmember just over a year ago! I took several measurements then chopped the old one out :o But on assembly nothing seemed to have moved so I tacked it into place then re-checked it & all seemed well so it was welded in & all turned out ok in the end :)

The job took most of a day to strip it all out & a day & a bit to replace & put all the other bits back on <_<

It is quite a straight forward job but I think the key is to take your time & don't rush!

001OldX-Member.jpg

1.jpg

Good Luck,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aye - it all went back together fine ...

but its now been sold on . . . but as a parting shot, i made this vid:

Phew! Where to start? Well - thanks for the reassuring info, but extra thanks for the link to the vid - it has everything... Great sound (why does everybody elses V8 sound better than mine?)... Tension (waiting for that side camera to get wiped-out) ... Humour (when it did) All served with helpings of mud! Must have taken ages to synchronise all the multiple image stuff... Very well done, a great video.

Looks like quite a good RRC to me - what did you replace it with?

Rog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its going to be replaced by a saloon. sensibilities are taking priority at the moment.

i still have my P38 rangie though in the meantime.

as for the future. i have an idea* for a project further down the line ( maybe a couple of years away ). based on a classic rangie, simple to implement, something i think would have a big grin factor ( for me at least ), will truly have that V8 sound, but something a little different.

and i'll leave it at that for a tease! :ph34r:

* actually, i know exactly what i want to do, just trying to persuade the wife is the hard part!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its going to be replaced by a saloon. sensibilities are taking priority at the moment.

i still have my P38 rangie though in the meantime.

as for the future. i have an idea* for a project further down the line ( maybe a couple of years away ). based on a classic rangie, simple to implement, something i think would have a big grin factor ( for me at least ), will truly have that V8 sound, but something a little different.

and i'll leave it at that for a tease! :ph34r:

* actually, i know exactly what i want to do, just trying to persuade the wife is the hard part!

Ahh - if only there was a way that we batchelors could get together and each donate a few brownie points to our brothers in need :) My nephew has a 2A and a pregnant wife - he appears to be hanging on to both quite successfully at the moment, but I think it's quite a juggling act; and he keeps talking about a 'sensible estate' car.

I guess one approach might be to convince the good lady that the Landie actually isn't worth anything (easy in my case), doesn't cost a lot (hmm, perhaps a little more difficult!) and is always there as backup to the sensible car (Imagine trying to get little Johnny to the hospital in the middle of a blizzard like we hade in 1972!)?

Good luck and I hope to see some more amazing video from you one day - featuring your dream project!

Rog.

(My eventual aim is a non-bobbed pickup, but for now I'll just be happy to get it through an MoT by next spring...)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Out of interest (since I have some rather similar work to do on Dad's RR) how do you get the rear bodywork panels off to get at the underneaths?

Not needed to do this one (yet), but I have looked at the job and it appears to be just: Light cluster, fuel filler (if required), a line of screws accessed from the inside just under the window (tried mine and they appear to be NOT rusted in!) and various rivets and bolts wherever you find them... Doesn't look to be a difficult job <_<

BTW: If you are going to be welding in the area of the filler neck (like me) and are not removing the tank (unlike me) then you might want to check the condition of the various breather tubes - one of mine was split wide open and stinking of petrol... I guess replacing that might help the petrol consumption too eh?

Rog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not needed to do this one (yet), but I have looked at the job and it appears to be just: Light cluster, fuel filler (if required), a line of screws accessed from the inside just under the window (tried mine and they appear to be NOT rusted in!) and various rivets and bolts wherever you find them... Doesn't look to be a difficult job <_<

BTW: If you are going to be welding in the area of the filler neck (like me) and are not removing the tank (unlike me) then you might want to check the condition of the various breather tubes - one of mine was split wide open and stinking of petrol... I guess replacing that might help the petrol consumption too eh?

Rog

Ta for that - while you're doing the tank rip out the metal fuel pipes (they rust) and replace with rubber hose, not only does it not rust but it's easier to get a bit of hose from the top of the tank to the filter than the arrangement of metal/rubber that's standard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as already said, there is a line of screws accessible from the inside underneath the window.

then there is also a couple of bolt things on the inside of the outwer wing at the top of the wheel arch. it holds the out wing to the inner wing area.

also the bottom back of the wheel arch attaches to the mud flap backet area although this often corrodes through.

lastly, there is a line of rivets which run down the inside of where the bottom tailgate meets the pillar area.

if you drill out all of those rivets, then the outer wing and rear corner outer will come off together.

be warned that a lot of seam sealer / sealant stuff may have been used to join the flat surfaces, so you may have to run a knife or scraper along the joins as you gently pull the 2 apart.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ta for that - while you're doing the tank rip out the metal fuel pipes (they rust) and replace with rubber hose, not only does it not rust but it's easier to get a bit of hose from the top of the tank to the filter than the arrangement of metal/rubber that's standard.

Good point - I'll do that... Do you know a source of suitable (ie cheap ;-) and resitant to petrol) tube? I guess that with returns and breathers etc I problably need about 15 metres?

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're taking the fuel tank out, I'd also suggest cutting an access hatch for the fuel pump if you've not already got one. I found a good article with the measurements at http://www.rangie.com/articles_topic.php?i...7&subCat=43

I just marked the hole, cut it, used a couple of pieces of sheet steel to make a lip and dropped the old piece of floor I'd cut out back in and gaffer taped it. At least now I don;t have to take the tank out again if the pump packs up

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good point - I'll do that... Do you know a source of suitable (ie cheap ;-) and resitant to petrol) tube? I guess that with returns and breathers etc I problably need about 15 metres?

Roger

Local motor factors or hydrualics shop, you need high pressure fuel hose as the fuel injection runs at ~36psi, 8mm bore if memory serves. Also grab a handful of stainless jubilee clips.

For the deluxe version, grab a couple of extra clips and a clear plastic universal in-line fuel filter and stick this in the return line in the engine bay so you can see the fuel returning, that helps greatly when diagnosing stuck fuel pressure regulators / dodgy fuel pumps / electrical faults as you can see at a glance if fuel is returning at the expected rate. The return is the one that goes from the fuel pressure regulator on the back of the plenum, sometimes people think it works the other way round.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Local motor factors or hydrualics shop, you need high pressure fuel hose as the fuel injection runs at ~36psi, 8mm bore if memory serves. Also grab a handful of stainless jubilee clips.

For the deluxe version, grab a couple of extra clips and a clear plastic universal in-line fuel filter and stick this in the return line in the engine bay so you can see the fuel returning, that helps greatly when diagnosing stuck fuel pressure regulators / dodgy fuel pumps / electrical faults as you can see at a glance if fuel is returning at the expected rate. The return is the one that goes from the fuel pressure regulator on the back of the plenum, sometimes people think it works the other way round.

Cheers FridgeFreezer, I got the tank out yesterday and althought the outside is quite rusted to hell, the inside is clean as a whistle :D . I pumped it out by wiring the punp to the numberplate light since the ecu would only run it for a couple of seconds unless the engine is running... Anyway, even when I upended the tank to get the last 2 gallons :blink: that were left in there when the pump started blowing air, all I got was beautifully clean petrol :P

That said I will be applying your idea of a clear filter in the return line - I like that...

The problem with my local motor factor is the cost - I think about £1 a foot if I remember rightly from when I replaced a short section a while ago... I was thinking that suitable industrial hose might be cheaper.. I'll have a look in the book for a 'hydraulics shop' - I think there is one between Tescos and B&Q ;)

I also like the sound of Peter Rainbird's idea for the fuel pump hatch - I'll be doing that too :)

While in the area of the boot floor - mine is aluminium but I was told that later ones were steel - anyone know if this is correct? And has anyone found a source of replacement panels (or even industrial stuff with the correct corrugations)?

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While in the area of the boot floor - mine is aluminium but I was told that later ones were steel - anyone know if this is correct? And has anyone found a source of replacement panels (or even industrial stuff with the correct corrugations)?

Pretty certain all Range Rovers had steel floors - if yours is alloy it's probably already had a replacement one. You can't buy the original panel any more, but corrugated alloy sheet ones seem to last better anyway. The only down side is the lack of access to the fuel pump, although I'm sure you could sort out something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

some were alu i think, cause they corroded against the inner wings and supports running around the edged.

Mine was alu originally iirc and i replaced mine with an alu one.... which i cut in half so i could take the rear half out without needing to move the LPG tank:

boot08.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy