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Defender windscreen removal & replacement


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Although I have removed and replaced a number of Defender windscreens in my time I have never made a point of having a camera on hand to record how I've gone about it. When I discovered a chip in the screen of my 110 XS Station Wagon the main dealer sent me off to Autoglass to have the screen replaced, here is how they do it...

The procedure is similar for all models but if you have a heated screen don't forget to disconnect the wiring from the connectors located at each corner on the bottom of the screen.

Remove interior trim strips from each side of the screen frame, each one is held in by a couple of self tapping screws:

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Starting at one corner carefully start to peel back the lip of the screen seal whilst maintaining a bit of pressure with your size 10 third hand:

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This guy has a fancy hooked tool to pull back the seal but the same can be acheived with a bit of strip metal bent to a 45 - 90 degree angle at one end:

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Continue to pull the lip of the seal back all the way along the top of the screen:

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Pull the lip up both sides too......all the while keeping a bit of gentle pressure on the glass:

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The screen will end up just resting on the bottom of the frame ...obviously don't push to hard as the screen will end up in bits on the bonnet!

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You should now be able to lift the screen away:

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In this case the total time for removing the screen was within 10 minutes.

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To fit the screen:

Make sure the area where the seal locates in the frame is clean and free from bits of old seal, sealant, flaky paint etc:

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Fit the windscreen seal to the glass....

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...until it is located neatly all the way around:

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Then start to feed a length of cord into the groove in the seal which locates in the frame:

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Not a very clear photo but he had fed the cord through the nozzle of an old sealant cannister and was using this to feed and locate the cord in the groove:

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He left two loops of cord at either side of the screen:

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The whole lot then is rested into the screen frame:

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The lip of the seal is then gently eased over the lip in the frame by pulling on the cord:

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To ensure the screen is not forced sideways out of the frame you need try to pull from both sides at the same time:

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Keep easing the lip in, you will probably need to pull quite hard in places - especially at the corners:

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The last bit:

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Refit the interior frame trim, clean the glass and that's it.

I have used a fairly strong mix of washing up liquid and water to lubricate the seal while refitting and when dry have also injected a bead of sealant under the lip of the seal between the frame and the glass but this chap used no lubricant or sealant. He reused the original seal (it's pretty new anyway) but it's obviously a false economy to refit an old perished seal.

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That's a good post -

I have to admit to being fascinated when watching someone doing a job like this.

These guys make stuff like this look so easy - when in fact it is very skillfull. OK they get loads of practice but the ease and confidence with which these folks work is very impressive.

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Out of interest MOG, what did this cost you (or your insurer)? My screen's probably the 1984 original and it's a little scratched and manky, although nothing specific which might make the insurance want to buy me another (and I wouldn't want to suggest it to them for fear of my premium rocketing). For £50 it might be a reasonable investment to be able to see where I'm going when the sun's low.

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Out of interest MOG, what did this cost you (or your insurer)? My screen's probably the 1984 original and it's a little scratched and manky, although nothing specific which might make the insurance want to buy me another (and I wouldn't want to suggest it to them for fear of my premium rocketing). For £50 it might be a reasonable investment to be able to see where I'm going when the sun's low.

I'm with NFU, if you use their approved company it's just £25 with no impact on NCB or premium, if you use another company the excess is £50. The main dealer who supplied the vehicle is covering the cost :) I kept the original screen too as it only had a wee chip.

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Well I've always found them to be fine, I rang them to make sure everything was in order and that the premium would not increase next year. Make sure you avoid places where a stone might might just accidentally damage the screen requiring a replacemnt anyway. Heated screens aren't that dear either :)

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