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Better than an axle wedge?


Les Henson
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Rather than fitting wedges to your axle after jacking the body up, would it be a better idea to cut through the axle tubes, raise the nose of the diff, and then weld it all back together? That way the toe-in stays the same, and the U/J's are less stressed, which is the object of the exercise isn't it? Anyone ever done this, and would there be problems with a line of weld around the axle tube (make it more likely to break)? If the recommended maximum angle of a U/J is 20deg, then you could almost program the axle to suit the suspension that you have fitted. At rest on the road you could have the nose of the diff set at, say minus 10deg, and therefore have plus 30deg on full suspension drop without fear of breaking a UJ.

Les. :)

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Yes, people do it all the time. Much better than wedges, as you say.

Indeed - our very own Mr Moglite did it on his Mog axles... (Well he watched Tonk do it... ;) ).

Best bet is to cut it off right at the flange I imagine - bit less reliant on the axle tube wall thickness that way.

Al. :)

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Would it be possible to cut between the U-Bolts? That way there would be some support each side of the weld, and you could clamp the joint to get the angle correct, tack-weld, remove the axle & weld up properly.

Sounds dodgy to me RTB... You don't need 'support either side of the weld', you just need a jig to hold the flange correctly against the axle case while you weld it all back up (at the correct angle!).

Of course you 'can' do anything - it's just which method will give the best result (alignment & stength) in the easiest manner.

People who do it a lot usually use a straightened bar as a jig with 'pucks' to hold the various bits in the right places. Shove bar through axle case, make sure pucks are correctly 'home', and you can base everything off your nice straight bar.

Personally I'm looking at cannibalising an I-beam and building brackets for the flanges etc off that. (Not Rover axles though).

Someone in Oz used to sell swivel balls with elongated holes where you could set your own caster angle. Forgotten who now though. I wonder how people who did this made sure they were the same both sids and didn't slip round in use. Personally I don't like the vagueness of it and would prefer correctly located holes, but it probably works fine in reality I guess...

Al.

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Sounds dodgy to me RTB... You don't need 'support either side of the weld', you just need a jig to hold the flange correctly against the axle case while you weld it all back up (at the correct angle!).

I wasn't suggesting the support should compensate for poor welding!!!!!!!!! Just belt & braces, and I would have thought thet it would be easier to hold everything in place whilst setting the angle up - no need for a jig??

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Sorry, I read it like you wanted to use the U-bolts (1 each side) to 'hold it' while you weld it. Which I don't personally think would give you enough certainty that the angle was bang on.

I wouldn't even tack it then remove the 'clamp' and do the full welds. For me it's got to all be done in the big strong jig to ensure alignment is correct afterwards.

Al.

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The castor correction thread is more complex by the looks of it. I would imagine that you could mark an axle for adjustment, then remove, cut, re-weld, replace. Making the axle flange bolt holes into slots is a bit hit and miss unless you have the equipment to do this accurately. If you were to scribe a line on both front axle tubes - then remove the axle, cut it, then offset the scribe line by (for instance) 3mm either side of the cut, and then weld back together. Wouldn't you then be doing the same thing with less trouble?

Les. :)

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Wouldn't you then be doing the same thing with less trouble?

Les. :)

Yes, you would, but people go a bit funny when talk of welders and cutting starts.

It's fair enough - the hole-elongation method is probably fine for those without the tools/skilz to do otherwise. And why not.

Not my preferred method personally though.

Al. :)

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Elongated holes - hmmm, what would happen if you hit something hard, wouldn't one end potentially rotate back a bit :blink: I suppose one way to stop that would be to stick something (weld!) in the un-used end of the hole to prevent movement. A bit less critical than cutting the end off and re-welding but I still don't like the sound of it. <_<

Perhaps this sort of thing is best done properly or left to an adult :ph34r:

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For you maybe, perhaps your IQ is too high for me. If it's dull, don't reply.

Fao detonationretard :- that has to be a weaker option then welding.

Les. :)

eh?

point being Im so sad I know lifespan reductions for UJs, not that the thread was boring

The alternative to slotting flange holes by hand is to make a drilling jig - or perhaps I better quit while Im behind...

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There have been a few posts where people have complained of rapid U/J wear - I know from experience the difference in steering on just driving a truck that has been jacked up. Axle wedges are fine if you know what wedges you want. You could however, could you more accurately measure how much you need to move the differential part of the axle in order to get articulation in the main direction (down), without causing more than necessary stress on associated parts of the vehicle. Then cut the axle tube, and using engineers wedges, move the differential to a more suitable position?

I think axle tubes are mild steel, so welding them wouldn't be a problem. I gas weld, so welding the tube either close to the outer flange, or at the diff housing would make it more difficult for this type of welding. My concern in this is that a weld would then become a weak point. I can understand using a sleeve, and then a pool weld, but on the short side this would cause complications due to the amount of bare axle tube available.

Les. :)

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Elongated holes - hmmm, what would happen if you hit something hard, wouldn't one end potentially rotate back a bit :blink: I suppose one way to stop that would be to stick something (weld!) in the un-used end of the hole to prevent movement. A bit less critical than cutting the end off and re-welding but I still don't like the sound of it. <_<

Perhaps this sort of thing is best done properly or left to an adult :ph34r:

les richmond - in the tech article - elongates the existing holes,and adds another non-elongated hole to stop any tendancy to rotate.rotational forces on the flange must be minimal compared to lateral forces.a good solution to castor correction imho.

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There have been a few posts where people have complained of rapid U/J wear - I know from experience the difference in steering on just driving a truck that has been jacked up. Axle wedges are fine if you know what wedges you want. You could however, could you more accurately measure how much you need to move the differential part of the axle in order to get articulation in the main direction (down), without causing more than necessary stress on associated parts of the vehicle. Then cut the axle tube, and using engineers wedges, move the differential to a more suitable position?

I think axle tubes are mild steel, so welding them wouldn't be a problem. I gas weld, so welding the tube either close to the outer flange, or at the diff housing would make it more difficult for this type of welding. My concern in this is that a weld would then become a weak point. I can understand using a sleeve, and then a pool weld, but on the short side this would cause complications due to the amount of bare axle tube available.

Les. :)

Axle cases are mild steel and do weld very nicely Ie.

compaxle4.jpg

Webb it to death and nothing will rip it off.

compaxle5.jpg

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