Jump to content

Fuel problem...again!?


Matthew
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi All..

Long story short; was out playing on salisbury plain a few months ago, when I got back on the tarmac it was very clear I had no where near full power. Infact at anything more than 1/4 throttle opening the engine seemed to be starved of fuel.

Got it back, drained the tiny amount of fuel left in the tank, changed the filter and lift pump (because I had them on the shelf anyway). Didn't make any difference at all.

Then I looked into this and the fuel filter was not getting filled properley so we knew there was a problem getting fuel from the tank to the filter. I used an air line to blow the fuel lines through and found the main pick up pipe from the tank had a blockage in it. Cleared by the airline pressure. Connected it all up and it ran really well...for a short time anyway!

Over the weekend the problem seems to have re-appeared! When using any more than 1/4 throttle opening the vehicle becomes incredibly sluggish and chucks out clouds of firstly grey then white smoke. I left the vehicle overnight and restarted this morning and got clouds of smoke when accelerating.

When you first start the vehicle and use only low revs, the engine runs well and sounds 100% normal.

Obviously I'll check the fuel lines again first, but has anyone had a similar problem? Anyone got any suggestions where/what to check?

Its a retro fitted 200TDi, vehicle used to be a 2.1/4 petrol.

Thanks for your help!

matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All..

Long story short; was out playing on salisbury plain a few months ago, when I got back on the tarmac it was very clear I had no where near full power. Infact at anything more than 1/4 throttle opening the engine seemed to be starved of fuel.

Got it back, drained the tiny amount of fuel left in the tank, changed the filter and lift pump (because I had them on the shelf anyway). Didn't make any difference at all.

Then I looked into this and the fuel filter was not getting filled properley so we knew there was a problem getting fuel from the tank to the filter. I used an air line to blow the fuel lines through and found the main pick up pipe from the tank had a blockage in it. Cleared by the airline pressure. Connected it all up and it ran really well...for a short time anyway!

Over the weekend the problem seems to have re-appeared! When using any more than 1/4 throttle opening the vehicle becomes incredibly sluggish and chucks out clouds of firstly grey then white smoke. I left the vehicle overnight and restarted this morning and got clouds of smoke when accelerating.

When you first start the vehicle and use only low revs, the engine runs well and sounds 100% normal.

Obviously I'll check the fuel lines again first, but has anyone had a similar problem? Anyone got any suggestions where/what to check?

Its a retro fitted 200TDi, vehicle used to be a 2.1/4 petrol.

Thanks for your help!

matt

I'd replace the fuel line front to back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd replace the fuel line front to back.

Thanks for the input marcus, I've just replaced the rubber sections of the fuel line because I had some kicking around. I did find a small break in one part of it so must have been pulling air in. Took it round the block quickly and still no different, going to take it for a longer drive in a minute. If still no better I'll replace the metal part of the fuel line as well.

Then it'll have had the following:

New fuel pick up sender (about 12months ago)

New rubber sections of fuel line (today)

New lift pump (about 2-3months ago)

New filter (about 2-3months ago)

Complete tank drain and flush (about 2-3months ago)

Anyone got any other ideas?

Thanks again!

matt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To test, run the engine off a can of fuel on the bonnet (safely, obviously), this will negate the need for a lift pump and allow you to test the filter and injection pump. Then put the can on the floor and use the lift pump, this will allow you to test that the lift pump is working.

My bet's on there still being a blockage in the fuel line running from the tank, or at the pickup.

Someone i knew had loads of trouble with fuel starvation. turned out he'd used ex-army jerry cans at one point which had emptied all of their internal paint into the fuel tank. he suffered from blocked pipes for months, despite cleaning the lines etc, there was just too much rubbish in the tank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions, fingers crossed its all sorted now! (runs off to find some wood to touch!?)

Just been out in it after changing the rubber sections and it seems to be running correctly again. I'll inspect all the other fuel lines in the morning and may replace anyway if the costs not going to be much.

Only problem is it would appear my oil pressure sensor has given up, no light with ignition turned on and engine off. Changed the bulb for a known good one, no different. Anyone know what signal/voltage you should get from the oil pressure sensor when there is no oil pressure?

Thanks,

matt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions, fingers crossed its all sorted now! (runs off to find some wood to touch!?)

Just been out in it after changing the rubber sections and it seems to be running correctly again. I'll inspect all the other fuel lines in the morning and may replace anyway if the costs not going to be much.

Only problem is it would appear my oil pressure sensor has given up, no light with ignition turned on and engine off. Changed the bulb for a known good one, no different. Anyone know what signal/voltage you should get from the oil pressure sensor when there is no oil pressure?

Thanks,

matt.

You should have 12v to the bulb and hence to the oil pressure sender unit. The sender unit effectively grounds out the 12v when no oil pressure is present ie. with the engine off. Then, when oil pressure is present, engine running, it isolates the ground, therefore, the light goes out. If you have a voltmeter/test lamp, check to see if you have supply between the oil pressure switch wire and earth. If you do the likelihood is that the switch is faulty. If not then the fault is upstream somewhere. If you have a multimeter you can check for continuity between the the oil pressure switch and earth with the engine off, you should have continuity, and with the engine running, there should not be continuity.

Hope this helps,

Mark.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy