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Rangie starting troubles


hedley
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Any Ideas please? :(

I have a 94' rrc 200tdi which has lost all ignition controlled electrics.

The little wire from the key to the starter got pinched and shorted out, now i have no ignition controlled electrics and i cant find why. :ph34r:

I have checked all the fuses i can find, in the fusebox on the dash, and those under the steering column, but to no avail!

Could i have blown one of the many relays under the steering column? (any ideas which1?)

Any sugestions would be greatly appreciated as i need it bk on the road!

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isn't there a fusible link in the main pos lead from the battery that covers everything except starting current?

I have full voltage on both starter and alternator, and all the interior/door curtosy lights work, its everything controlled by the key that is the problem

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I'll get my coat, were having a 'soft' day.....

sorry - not trying to be obtuse or anything... I believe that the rear wiper IS ignition controlled but is not controlled by the main power relay (the one you suspect anyway) so what I was thinking is that if this works, then it's probably worth pulling the dash (I think it's below the steering wheel) to have a look at it.

Rog

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sorry - not trying to be obtuse or anything... I believe that the rear wiper IS ignition controlled but is not controlled by the main power relay (the one you suspect anyway) so what I was thinking is that if this works, then it's probably worth pulling the dash (I think it's below the steering wheel) to have a look at it.

its k, i'll try anything at the mo, but i have already pulled that pannel off, at that point i got lost and came on here!

i'll get my coat again n c if i can find sum red and white wires...

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no the rear wiper is also dead, all i have is horn, sidelights and interior/door lights

Gotta go now but with what you have said, I'd be looking at the power to the ignition switch (or the switch itself)... Could try running a direct feed to the switch perhaps (anyone know which wire? brown perhaps?)

Best of luck with it...

Rog

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Is there a second fuse box in the engine bay like there is on the 300TDi Defenders that takes 4 or 5 Mega Fuses (Large Blade Fuses.) Has one of them blown.

I dont think there is one, as far as i know, and i have crawled over most of the engine bay raplacing various things..... I may stand to be corrected tho....

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I would suspect fusible link P119 :)

According to the wiring diagram (I've emailed you a copy) this link is between the battery and the ignition switch :)

I've never looked for the fusible links and they are not shown in the electrical compont location diagrams I have but a web seach found this......

The first place to look is the right-hand side of the engine compartment behind the battery. That's where you'll find a bundle of fusible links wrapped up in the wiring harness. A fusible link is simply an insulated wire calibrated to burn and break a circuit when amperage flow becomes excessive.

Note this is from a yank site so links may be the other side of the engine bay.

Hope this helps

Fitz

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My first question would be "Is there power getting to the ignition switch from the battery?" If no, persue that wire. If yes, "is there power coming out again?". If not then the switch is U/S. If yes then follow that wire to the next component (A relay?) and repeat the test. Electrics is simple enough if you approach it methodicaly.

Chris

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I would suspect fusible link P119 :)

According to the wiring diagram (I've emailed you a copy) this link is between the battery and the ignition switch :)

I've never looked for the fusible links and they are not shown in the electrical compont location diagrams I have but a web seach found this......

The first place to look is the right-hand side of the engine compartment behind the battery. That's where you'll find a bundle of fusible links wrapped up in the wiring harness. A fusible link is simply an insulated wire calibrated to burn and break a circuit when amperage flow becomes excessive.

Note this is from a yank site so links may be the other side of the engine bay.

Hope this helps

Fitz

As Fitz said, the fusible links are the problem. They are not visible though. From the battery there should be a large wire and then one slightly smaller wire/s. Follow these along the top of the inner wing, you'll need to remove the electrical tape from around them, as they're tied together and shielded. Each fusible link will have a plasticy style netting over them. get hold of each end of each of the links and tug. The blown one will stretch farther than the rest. Alternatively place a multi-meter probe at each end of the links, with the ignition on, the faulty one will show a voltage on it.

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Alternatively place a multi-meter probe at each end of the links, with the ignition on, the faulty one will show a voltage on it.

Are you suggesting connecting a voltmeter in series? Surely that is the easy way to knacker your voltmeter/multimeter?

Chris

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Are you suggesting connecting a voltmeter in series? Surely that is the easy way to knacker your voltmeter/multimeter?

Chris

No, in parallel.

However, as stated, if the circuit is loaded (eg switched on) and the circuit between the probes is open, then you will have a voltage pass through the meter (the circuit will not work as the circuit is completing the earth path for the meter). Look at it as a battery voltage check, one side of the wire is positive, where the break is the power stops, then the rest of the circuit becomes the earth. If the circuit voltage should be 12v then you will have 12v on the meter (if the circuit is broken). If you're testing wiring to a 5v sensor for example, then the voltage may be 5v. If there is a resistance in a bulb circuit using for example 2v and the circuit was 12v, then besides a dull bulb the meter would indicate 2v as 10v is getting through the wirnig but 2v are being dropped.

It's called volt-drop testing, and is the proper way to test vehicle electrical circuits, and the only way to test modern vehicle electrics. Using a meter on resistance will not pick up a wire with only one strand left joining it, and may in some circuits actually damage electronic processors/components in some of the latest cars.

Are you still with me? :blink:

Never was any good at college, just know how to use it. :ph34r:

(To test the theory, remove a side light fuse, turn the lights on and put each probe of the multi-meter on each of the fuse connectors in the fusebox, whatever your battery voltage is, is what you'll get on the meter).

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No, in parallel.

However, as stated, if the circuit is loaded (eg switched on) and the circuit between the probes is open, then you will have a voltage pass through the meter (the circuit will not work as the circuit is completing the earth path for the meter). Look at it as a battery voltage check, one side of the wire is positive, where the break is the power stops, then the rest of the circuit becomes the earth. If the circuit voltage should be 12v then you will have 12v on the meter (if the circuit is broken). If you're testing wiring to a 5v sensor for example, then the voltage may be 5v. If there is a resistance in a bulb circuit using for example 2v and the circuit was 12v, then besides a dull bulb the meter would indicate 2v as 10v is getting through the wirnig but 2v are being dropped.

It's called volt-drop testing, and is the proper way to test vehicle electrical circuits, and the only way to test modern vehicle electrics. Using a meter on resistance will not pick up a wire with only one strand left joining it, and may in some circuits actually damage electronic processors/components in some of the latest cars.

Are you still with me? :blink:

Never was any good at college, just know how to use it. :ph34r:

(To test the theory, remove a side light fuse, turn the lights on and put each probe of the multi-meter on each of the fuse connectors in the fusebox, whatever your battery voltage is, is what you'll get on the meter).

Nice explanation! Not a teacher are you? I easily understood the whole concept after reading this :) Just wondering though (not that it affects me) - why is it the only way to test modern vehicle electrics?

Rog

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Nice explanation! Not a teacher are you? I easily understood the whole concept after reading this :) Just wondering though (not that it affects me) - why is it the only way to test modern vehicle electrics?

Rog

Deffo not a teacher, couldn't stand school!! :D

Using a multi-meter set to measure resistance, means you are passing a small voltage down the wire via the meter.

An airbag, for example, could be triggered by that voltage. :blink:

(however SRS wiring testing is slightly different anyway, as you would use a resistor in place of the airbag component for diagnosis, but that's another story).

As far as I'm aware, for vehicle manufacturers, it's the only accepted way of testing wiring for warranty purposes.

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