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200 tdi bottom pulley removal


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i've been trying for a while now to get my bottom pulley off, so i can check the timing before i strip the rest of the engine down to fix other problems.

but it wont come off. I've got the bolt out, that came off ok, the pulley just will not budge. so far i have tried:

1) levering between the pulley and the timing case - didnt try too hard, didnt want to damage the casing.

2) home made puller with m8 studs going into the bolt holes on the pulley, and a larger stud into the threaded part of the crank - i put so much tension on this is snapped the m8 studding.

3) same as 2 but with enough heat to make the pulley boss glow - still didnt shift it

i'm now running out of ideas. my dad wants to take a grinder to it but i dont think that will help as the pulley fits back into the timing case.

do hydraulic pullers work much better than a mechanical one? am i just going to snap the bolts again though?

does anyone have any other ideas?

i'm starting to think i might be needing a replacement engine if i cant get this off.

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Adapt your puller to use M8 bolts (good quality) so you can turn the M8 bolts to extract the pulley (until it starts to move) not the center bolt. Work the M8 bolts in small increments (10-20 degrees steps) and try to keep equal tension in them.

Heat was a good idea but you need to do it 3-4 times in a row and cool it in between. It would help to use a refrigerant spray to cool the cranckshaft (heavy spraying inside the threaded hole) every time after you heat the lot. Do it 3-4 times and then try your new puller while hot.

I don't see the grinding as an option.

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Hi,

Hydraulic pullers work well as I used one to remove my drop arm off my steering box as I knew it was going to be tight.

Use an old bolt that fits the thread in the crank pulley or a smaller bolt with a large washer behind it, this way you do not damage your pulley bolt as this is where the puller will apply its force.

You could also try some penetrating oil and leave it overnight to soak in.

Hope this helps

Steve

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i've soaked it in penetrating fluid every day for the last week, and it still wont budge :(

I got a whole timing kit and puller off of enay for about £40. It has the timing pins for the injection pump and to lock the flywheel on various landies and includes a puller for the pulley. It might save a whole lot of effort here. I would have thought the bolts would take the strain of whats needed here. Otherwise use your bit of homemade kit with some heavier duty bolts as suggested.

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I'd say some one has used loctite on the pulley bore, possibly because it's come loose in the past. The crank may well be damaged and the whole lot covered in quick metal or bearing fit. This can be very difficult to shift, it can be done though.

Firstly, if you haven't already done so, remove the pulley section from the damper. This should allow you to get some heat right into the stuck part.

Get a proper puller, one that uses all 4 bolt holes on the damper.

Wind up the puller and apply some heat to the damper. You need to get the heat right down the whole length to break the bond, not just the end.

Heat, give the puller a tweak, then a couple of sharp blows with a hammer on the puller and damper, leave it for a bit and repeat. Just keep at it and always leave the puller on under tension.

It will come off, honest!

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A 'decent' puller will work even if is it has been Loctited (Nut lock grade).

If a very heavy, or 'shaft recovery' grade has been used, then it could be a problem.

Do a search for DIFFLOCK timing belt renewal. They do a very good guide, also they do a very good kit of tools that some people say you dont need, but I think it's best to have good gear on these jobs. They do a very good puller in the kit.

In their guide, they recommend the use of Loctite on the pully bore.

On the planet that I come from, when a front pulley comes loose it chews up the front of the crank shaft and it's never the same again.

When you have experienced that, you will do everything to stop it next time.

Good luck.

Howard.

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I can't vouch for the difflock tools, but they certainly look like what you need.

"Cheap" cambelt jobs invariably involve the crank bolt being "gunned" up, this gets it nowhere near the 250 lb ft it needs to be. The pulley then works loose. Depends how long it's been run as to the damage. I've seen plenty with minor damage and the pulley has just been put back on with bearing fit (high grade). A few have been really bad and the crank has been smeared with quick metal and the pulley, often a new one, bolted back.

Heat will break the bond, you just need enough of it and a constant pull while you're doing it.

A light smear of loctite in the pulley bore on reassembly is often recommended, only needs to be a light/medium grade though.

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I can't vouch for the difflock tools, but they certainly look like what you need.

"Cheap" cambelt jobs invariably involve the crank bolt being "gunned" up, this gets it nowhere near the 250 lb ft it needs to be. The pulley then works loose. Depends how long it's been run as to the damage. I've seen plenty with minor damage and the pulley has just been put back on with bearing fit (high grade). A few have been really bad and the crank has been smeared with quick metal and the pulley, often a new one, bolted back.

Heat will break the bond, you just need enough of it and a constant pull while you're doing it.

A light smear of loctite in the pulley bore on reassembly is often recommended, only needs to be a light/medium grade though.

Here-Here.

Howard.

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i know its not been glued on or anything, because i put the pulley on when i did the cambelt a few years ago.

its funny how some people say to glue it, some say grease it. i did neither and now it wont come off :(

i'm off out today to buy/rent a puller, probably a hydraulic one. its something i've needed a few times on boats, its about time i got one

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i know its not been glued on or anything, because i put the pulley on when i did the cambelt a few years ago.

its funny how some people say to glue it, some say grease it. i did neither and now it wont come off :(

i'm off out today to buy/rent a puller, probably a hydraulic one. its something i've needed a few times on boats, its about time i got one

The application of 'grease' or 'Glue' to the pully bore are attempts to avoid 'fretting corrosion' at that place.

This type of corrosion takes place when two parts vibrate together at a microscopic level, it may even cause the formation of chemicals.

I have found the use of lubricants in these static joints to be less effective than sealing/bonding, in the longer term.

As you used 'nothing' last time, that could well be why you now find it rusted on so badly.

It's a common engineering problem, but not widely understood.

Also, it's a wee bit of a wet windy, rusty, place up front there on a Landy, and that can't help us.

Good luck with the new puller, I know full well it's a 'barstewerd' when we get trapped like this.

Howard.

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