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half shafts


series3_mad
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depends how wide the tyres are too, i'm assuming 12.50's?

easy upgrade but only slightly stronger is late ser3 shafts, they are 24 spline at the drive end but still 10 spline to fit your diff.

TI Console do some uprated shafts, they will sell straight to this country, i have no idea if they're any good though i seem to remember someone on here buying a set :unsure:

theres also GBR in the states but not sure on shipping times, i think Astro Al went this route at some stage.

failing that its rebuild your diffs to 24 spline and talk to KAM to get some.

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Depends quite simply on how you drive and how much mechanical sympathy you've got.

As mark says - late (24 spline outer) front and rear is as good as you'll get for sensable money. Options are very limited for the series anyway as few people make uprated shafts. The fronts are pretty strong and we both still run standard (late) front shafts with Arb's and silly tyres.....

Jon

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I run 235*85 Grizzlies on the lightweight, broke half shafts as a hobby, still carry two in the back as spares.

Have a detroit locker in the back and truetrac in the front.

Bought TI Console shafts about 18 months ago and not broken them yet, I don't go at everything flat chat but don't hold back either so I guess tey are not that bad.

I do about 1500 miles a year so make your own judgements.

Cost I think was only about £120.00.

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Don't forget as well as everything that has been said, your engine torque output is a big factor.

After all - this dictates what torque the shaft sees (along with tyre radius, tyre friction limit etc etc...).

More torque = more breakage.

Al.

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open diffs or lockered?

easy swap in?

piccies of install?

I have still yet to complete the swap. The rear is a landcruiser fully floater with a hilux head welded in (lots of clearence). Its pretty easy to do. The diff heads have been shaved (for another 1/2 inch or so clearence). Im coiling the front. The rear has been easy so far as the internal diameter of the cruiser is the same as the external of the hilux and the shaft splines are the same. Ya kinda need pics to explain it properly. My dads mate who has a trials truck, has been running like this for yonks and hasnt broken anything.

Where would I start a build thread?

The reason I chose toyota axles was the availibility and strength in NZ. You could run with the standard landcruiser (fj40) diffs which are stronger, but if I run 35's on a hilux diff, it would be equal to running 37's on a cruiser.

The front is a standard hilux with rangie control arms and some old fox coil overs I got realy cheaply B)

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Another solution is to use a rover case, shorten one side lengthen the other recenter the spring seats drop a 24 spline arb in and a set of standard salisbury shafts, works very very well :)

For the front a rangy or even better early 90/110 works well, you get loads of lock without the tyres hitting the chassis as well, and the the sky is the limit as regards h/d internals

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Another solution is to use a rover case, shorten one side lengthen the other recenter the spring seats drop a 24 spline arb in and a set of standard salisbury shafts, works very very well :)

basically the set up i've got, apart from i didn't chop the axle up, just fitted 24 spline ARB and KAM h/shafts with uprated ring and pinion

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I dont like the conversion where people put rangie axles onto series. I've seen plenty where the steering rods are nothing other than downright dangerous. The only other way i've seen it done is by spacing the axle a long way up off od the front leaves but this compromises ground clearance.

Not happy with with either solution really.....

Jon

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I dont like the conversion where people put rangie axles onto series. I've seen plenty where the steering rods are nothing other than downright dangerous. The only other way i've seen it done is by spacing the axle a long way up off od the front leaves but this compromises ground clearance.

Not happy with with either solution really.....

Jon

Using a lhd swivel housing and stacking roses at the front works well enough,

Or the same solution but using a diahatsu TRE that has a tapered hole in it for the steering bar to attach.

Another way is to take the standard series steering arms (the ones that attach with the king pins) and press the king pins out, have new king pins made to suit the rangy swivel and then drill and tap the rangy swivel to take the 4 bolts fixing bolts, job done standard steering :D

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Using a lhd swivel housing and stacking roses at the front works well enough,

Or the same solution but using a diahatsu TRE that has a tapered hole in it for the steering bar to attach.

Another way is to take the standard series steering arms (the ones that attach with the king pins) and press the king pins out, have new king pins made to suit the rangy swivel and then drill and tap the rangy swivel to take the 4 bolts fixing bolts, job done standard steering :D

Hmmmmm not a fan of rose joints for an off roader as they wear too quickly.

Never seen the diahatsu TRE's. Got any piccys??

Every series steering arm I've ever seen is a one piece casting. Are genunine ones pressed in or something?

I still firmly beleive however that standard (late) series front shafts are stronger than standard rangie fronts by a long way..........and you dont end up with those troublesome CV's.....

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Hmmmmm not a fan of rose joints for an off roader as they wear too quickly.

Never seen the diahatsu TRE's. Got any piccys??

Every series steering arm I've ever seen is a one piece casting. Are genunine ones pressed in or something?

I still firmly beleive however that standard (late) series front shafts are stronger than standard rangie fronts by a long way..........and you dont end up with those troublesome CV's.....

Depending on the quality of the roses they can last very well, but i'd expect to see 6-9months out of them.

diahatsu pics on the way(ish).

Ive done two like this, i just thought all of the series had servicable(ie removable) king pins.

As for the standard shafts being stronger, at the hub and u joint maybe, they are just the same at the diff.

But the sky is the limit with upgrades on rr stuff. short of having stuff custom made with series stuff you are stuffed.

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Depending on the quality of the roses they can last very well, but i'd expect to see 6-9months out of them.

diahatsu pics on the way(ish).

Ive done two like this, i just thought all of the series had servicable(ie removable) king pins.

As for the standard shafts being stronger, at the hub and u joint maybe, they are just the same at the diff.

But the sky is the limit with upgrades on rr stuff. short of having stuff custom made with series stuff you are stuffed.

6-9 months is not long enough IMHO.

Nice one - ta!

Agreed.........sorry - I meant to say I think the U/J's are stronger than CV's. I've put twists in the inner front shafts of mine at the diff end, but they're cheap and easy to replace.

True. Sometimes I thing having a weaker link is a bonus however. Last time I broke it I took all the teeth off of the input gear in the transfer box!

Be interested to see some more info on a "properly engineered" RR axle conversion thats safe and doesnt compromise ground clearance.

Never seen a 2 piece steering arm from a series - anyone know different?

Cheers

Jon

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