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Are these strong enough ?


landrover598
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They look very similar in design of the lifting eyes that lightweights have.

Alas those eyes are not suitable for recovery :(

For a straight pull my amateur opinion says they'll be fine, but have a long hard think about what will happen with a 45 degree pull.

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Guest diesel_jim

I was always under the impression that recovery eyes should be either "bolted" through a piece of metal, or at least "pinned" somewhat, instead of relying on welding only.

shame, as you've done a great job there!

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Was a bit bored this afternoon so made a pair of recovery eyes, which will be welded to my 6mm bumper inline with the chassis rails. But i'm not sure if theyr'e going to be stong enough :unsure: Anyone got any suggestions ? There's 12mm between the hole and the outer edge, 25mm thick

Recoveryeyes.jpg

You've got a bow shackle there, somewhere on it will be a safe lifting load, plus if your going to weld it, a good, i.e. coded weld is rated at one tonne per inch of weld, thats a 6mm radius weld, so you can do the sums and ask yourself how good your weld will be.

Thats the best I can give you, people usual bolt if they are doubtful about there welding, industrially lifting eyes are always welded to the item to be lifted. Plus you have to ask yourself if the material of the bumper is strong enough, if it was me I'd weld that lug to a thick plate and weld the plate to the bumper, ie spreading the load.

Bill

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The shackle is 4.75 T and i'll be able to get about 8 inch of weld around the eye

There you go 4.75 tonne is the safe load so in my mind you've a good shackle, eight inches of good weld is plenty, but as I said in my edit you've got to think about the material of the bumper, if your happy if not spread the load with a plate.

Good luck Bill

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They look very similar in design of the lifting eyes that lightweights have.

Alas those eyes are not suitable for recovery :(

For a straight pull my amateur opinion says they'll be fine, but have a long hard think about what will happen with a 45 degree pull.

Andy, my chance to actually speak about sometthing I know about, the picture shows a bow shackle, its designed to take its load through a 90 degree angle through its centreline, a normal or straight shackle isn't, there rated at a straight pull, so that shackle is rated at 4.75 tonne pull through 45 degrees either side , don't know about the bumper though, could tend to rip the material thats why I'd spread the load.

Bill

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Perhaps a bit of 40x10 between the eye and the bumper would do the trick. Going back to Moglite's comment about a sideways pull, how about welding the eyes horizontally on the bumper ?

Yep thats a good idea, you tend to pull more sideways than up and down and the plate is also good, I stuck a post up here a while ago about some brilliant lifting eyes we've just got for work, RUD-Lifting points, these rotate and pivot, but they are expensive.

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As said already it will be down to the welding. Bear in mind if it does let go you may have only time to get as far as "F" before it goes through somebody's window/head :unsure:

I wouldn't weld them on if it were mine because I'm not sure about my welding, but that's just me!

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The weld is not the problem. Is this a stock Defender bumper? They are very thin. In addition the mounting of the bumper to the chassis is not very strong. If using a bumper, it needs to be an integarted design of the bumper and bumper mounting to take the loads.

Don't mount them sideways. Most hard pulls should be straight ahead, but there is always an up or down angle.

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The weld is not the problem. Is this a stock Defender bumper? They are very thin. In addition the mounting of the bumper to the chassis is not very strong. If using a bumper, it needs to be an integarted design of the bumper and bumper mounting to take the loads.

Don't mount them sideways. Most hard pulls should be straight ahead, but there is always an up or down angle.

If you look at the drawing it shows either what I would guess is either an M10 or M12 bolt straight through the chassis, now a M12 bolt from the top of my head is about six tonne in double shear which is what it is, times at least two.

Its the guys decision and I knew you have big hills in Canada but most pulls are either straight ahead or off to the side in a general horizontal plain, plus looking at the picture if its mounted sideways he'll have a longer weld again in the horizontal plain, plus with a bow shackle any vertical load would be taken by the shackle design thats why the best recovery points are rotating shackles cos they'll find there own angle.

But thats just my own twopence worth and the guys in wales so perhaps hes coming out of the valleys boyo.

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Well, IME, pulls are normally out of mud pits where the vehicle is low or up hills where the rope pulls down. Normally you try and pull straight. Angles are mostly up and down, IME. Side pulls occur and with the style shown, I would not pull hard. The style shown welded on vertically is a very common attachment method for shackles.

M12 is OK, M10 is too small. The bigger concern with the stock bumper though is the bearing area for the bolts. Much, much too small.

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It's a custom made heavy duty winch bumper

OK, then it should be easy. The perimeter of the compensation pad should be at least 1.5 times the mounting lug stressed area. It is 25mm x 24mm.... so say 600 square mm. Thus with the 6mm plate then.. . 600 * 1.5 = 900... 900 / 6 = 150 mm of perimeter minimum around the compensation plate.

Make sure the bumper is well attached to the chassis. The stock 4 bolts of M10 are really marginal. M12 is a 44% improvement.

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you could always slot the bumper so you can weld the front and the back of the lug, also then weld an upright gusset up the back of the recovery point to spread the load into the top faces of the bumper from the recovery point

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