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brake lines legality


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is there any disadvantage to doing this?, the main reason for me doing it is because i dont have a flaring tool and i dont have the old pipe to know where the bends should be.

Be cheaper to buy a flaring tool than all that braided hose :D

Braided is OK , I've used it in competition cars, just be aware that long unsecured runs tend to move when pressure is applied and can rub on bodywork etc so secure at more points than you would with rigid pipe. :)

P.S. I service an Ariel Atom and all the brake lines are braided flexi hose

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I did all mine in TFE from ThinkAuto, the fittings cost the money not the hose so it was easier to do the whole thing in braided than make up a load of flexis, then join them to copper, then back to flexi... also makes things like removing the rear calipers a doddle as you can swing them about without worrying about the pipe.

The only drawback is you can't smash TFE flat with a rock to affect a field repair, although that's countered by the fact that if you have a length of pipe and a joining fitting or two you don't need a flaring kit, and all the fittings are re-makeable. Also you'll need to think about where fittings need to rotate to be tightened, this means buying a few extra bits which can add to the cost.

All in though, I'm happy with the setup - I don't like the faff of flaring copper, or the fun of trying to route it nicely without kinking.

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Thats all massive £££s though.

Going the standard pipe route, I remember a strandard roll of cupro nickel (about 20ft ish) costing about £10, the ends I bought were expensive as I only bought a few at £1 each (you should be able to do better than that).

Moprod used to market a simple flaring tool for single and double flares (just the one 3/16 size for cars) which is a doddle to use as long as you follows the instructions with the tool (it has marked up dies that tell you when to stop flaring). I use one and it produces good flares about 98% of the time - can't remember the cost, but probably around £20-30 now - if they still sell it.......

cheap as chips in comparison :D ....

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Thats all massive £££s though.

If things are standard, yes it's a bit pricey. But I was looking at needing custom flexis anyway, with adapters for the Wilwood calipers. I didn't have the truck to a point where I knew accurately what lengths I'd need the flexis to be so wasn't able to order custom from Llama, for example. Buying the tube & fittings and making my own flexis was the way that worked for me, and as I said - the ends cost the money, so cutting out the copper sections actually didn't cost anything extra and saved a load of extra joints and work.

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Thats all massive £££s though.

Going the standard pipe route, I remember a strandard roll of cupro nickel (about 20ft ish) costing about £10, the ends I bought were expensive as I only bought a few at £1 each (you should be able to do better than that).

Moprod used to market a simple flaring tool for single and double flares (just the one 3/16 size for cars) which is a doddle to use as long as you follows the instructions with the tool (it has marked up dies that tell you when to stop flaring). I use one and it produces good flares about 98% of the time - can't remember the cost, but probably around £20-30 now - if they still sell it.......

cheap as chips in comparison :D ....

I have one of those Moprod flaring tools. As does Les. I could do with a new screw bit but they are no longer made. One of the best bits of kit I bought.

I tried to buy one a couple of years ago.

mike

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ok thanks. FridgeFreezer is it fairly simple making up the hoses with unions as brakes are important and i dont want to have a go if i might risk it be dangerous?

Cut the hose, slide the nut on, push the olive onto the hose (it sits in between the TFE and the braiding), push the end on firmly and then tighten the nut. Check for leaks and tighten a bit more if it weeps. Cutting the TFE cleanly helps, I was being a rougharse and using normal cable snips so they did flatten the cut end a bit and make the ferrules a bit tricky to slip on (they're a *very* close fit to the tube), also I was a bit cautious tightening the fittings up so there were more than a few leaks, mainly because I'm used to being a bit careful when tightening normal brake fittings. These are made of steel though so do stand up to more torque than you'd expect.

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