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Cutting Steel Accurately wth an Angle Grinder


Spearos
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As the title really, I don't cut much steel so splashing out of a new piece of equipment isn't really an option. Just wondered if anyone has any hints/tips/tricks for making straight cuts in steel accurately with an Angle Grinder?

Cheers

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If you have a piece of angle iron, you can always clamp that onto what you're cutting, and then (using a thin disc) run the disc along that to create a line to then follow..... however, remove the engle or you won;t cut it at 90degs to the face....

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If you have a piece of angle iron, you can always clamp that onto what you're cutting, and then (using a thin disc) run the disc along that to create a line to then follow..... however, remove the engle or you won;t cut it at 90degs to the face....

I like it, so it's a bit like scoring a line for the disc to follow? I have recently started using the thin discs - what a difference they make!

I knew someone on here would have a good tip - many thanks.

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Basically yeh, i find it sometimes awkward getting a straight line with the thin discs, unless you have a really steady hand...... the other thing i have found is not to hold the thin discs hard againast what you're cutting, run the disc up and down the cut with light pressure, the discs seem to last longer that way!

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Depending on the length of the cut and the working position there are a number of ways to cut straight. The main thing to remember is to do a dry run to make sure that you are able to move the grinder in a nice smooth straight line without losing your balance or bumping into something or adjusting your grip.

Scoring the line with the cutting disc first can help. You can use a length of angle laid with its open edges downwards so that the angle forms a 45deg slope away form the cutting disk, that way it won't get in the way.

Here's a splined shaft I cut with a 4 1/2" grinder with a standard cutting disc on it. I held the shaft in the vice pointing downwards and cut vertically for each spline.

DSC00353.jpg

DSC00356.jpg

DSC00357.jpg

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The main thing to remember is to do a dry run to make sure that you are able to move the grinder in a nice smooth straight line without losing your balance or bumping into something or adjusting your grip.

Top Tip Mr Night Train!
Here's a splined shaft I cut with a 4 1/2" grinder with a standard cutting disc on it.

And THIS is above and beyond!

I think you have blurred the line between engineering and fine art there :)

Roger

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The angle iron idea works well, and if you do "slip" a bit you won't damage the workpiece.

Todays jobs include trimming my rear quarters and cutting a hole in the bulkhead...for the rear I'll be using a cutting disc, for the bulkhead it'll be a jigsaw with metal blade.

Don't forget, a hacksaw isn't too difficult to use and may be quicker than setting up the angle grinder and guide ;)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I used to have one of those.

In reality I found it woefully inaccurate. The vice was difficult to set square, and didn't want to stay where I set it. Also the whole thing was not robust enough and just tended to chatter heavily when cutting.

I now have one of these, a far superior device IMO.

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For an extra £100 I should hope it's a lot better!

Correct me if I'm wrong but both of these would be ok for lengths of say box section, but I cannot see how you'd use one on a large sheet of metal.

Still like the idea of using a 'guide' to start the cut, I might round to trying it soon!!

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i use the slitting disks they are great(can even cut curves if your carefull)

BUT

there are good ones and bad ones

the ebourer make from srewfix are very good as are the rodus ones from tool station the norton ones on the other hand are carp (as quick as you touch the steel they disapeer)

they even do a 2mm thick one for the 9" grinder (great for box/tube

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