Jump to content

Road Tax Hike not working


dollythelw
 Share

Recommended Posts

That's very scary, but If that road were in Vietnam, there would always be some idiots wanting to overtake, without considering or even caring if there was another vehicle coming in the opposite direction. Life is very cheap in developing third world countries.

Bill.

That's the problem with hinduism/buddism, it doesn't matter if you die, you will just come back again as something else!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's the problem with hinduism/buddism, it doesn't matter if you die, you will just come back again as something else!

Life is cheap, but labor is cheaper still in those countries. For very little money and little disruption to traffic flow, they could employ hundreds of poor people to widen that Yungas road with handtools,and many like it around the world.

Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Life is cheap, but labor is cheaper still in those countries. For very little money and little disruption to traffic flow, they could employ hundreds of poor people to widen that Yungas road with handtools,and many like it around the world.

Bill.

30 years ago I traveled (by bus) on a similar looking road (mostly 3 metres wide but with passing places on the straighter bits) in the Himalayas, I think it went on like that for about 10 miles - it was so dangerous that the bus driver wouldn't proceed until everybody (including me) had been blessed by some kind of a holy man in a small temple by the roadside... Big sections were one way with the direction reversing at certain times. Imagine the fun there was when we met a truck coming the other way! Apparently there had been a landslide which had blocked the road so he had turned round. Goodness knows how! We walked past the landslide (frighteningly exposed even for us climbers) and caught the bus on the other side – even swapping tickets with the passengers coming the other way.

Now for the science bit:

The road I traveled was blasted into solid rock, and the only way to widen it would be to cut further into the (about 60 degree?) slope - so that for every metre length of road:

If we assume it's 3m wide, the original blasting would have removed 9 cubic metres of rock (BTW this was thrown into the valley. I was told that building the road was a massive undertaking that took the army 2 years and all that rock tumbling down the slope really upset the people who live below...) If they widen it by another three metres - that’s an additional 27 cubic metres of rock per metre length of road.. Big job for had tools methinks… but then – the Pyramids were built that way so… I’ll get me coat :);)

Roger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Big job for had tools methinks… but then – the Pyramids were built that way so… I’ll get me coat :);)

Roger

To us in the developed west ,widening and deepening a river would seem impractical without dredging machinary. But in Hanoi Vietnam during 2001/2002 I watched as many workers with hand tools, bamboo poles and canvas tarps, dammed off half the width of a major river for a length of over 1 kilometre, then dug out the other half with spades and shovels and carried away the spoil by hand in what looked like Pith helmets. Not a wheel barrow to be seen anywhere. when one half was done they diverted the flow to that side and started again on the other half.

Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy