Jump to content

Eightpot

Settled In
  • Posts

    1,943
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    13

Eightpot last won the day on March 6

Eightpot had the most liked content!

Reputation

293 Excellent

Profile Information

  • Location
    Worcestershire

Recent Profile Visitors

3,834 profile views
  1. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FLOCKED-LINED-RUBBER-SLIDING-WINDOW-CHANNEL-UPTO-6-MM-GLASS-/223155797893?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m2548.l6249&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0
  2. Always wondered how long ice cubes etc would last in a flask in the bottom of the fridge? Some of the modern wide neck soup flasks look like you could get a few choc ices in, or sawn off lollies 🙂
  3. You need some flock rubber window seal, for windows up to 6mm thick from memory. Can buy per metre from ebay, woolies trim etc. Pull any old rotten seal out, push this back in, you dont need to go round the corners, even a bit top and bottom will stop the rattling.
  4. I've got a few fridges dotted about in different vehicles, some thoughts on those if its of help - a couple of old Waeco CF40s which have exceeded all expectation, only downsides are fragile lid & doesn't slot in as neatly with its more curved shape, though later models look better. Tried a tropicool thermoelectric which worked nicely as well, obviously not as good as compressor but big improvement on the standard halfords type boxes. Engel 35 & 40l are what cockroaches will store thier beer in after armageddon. Lacking in features, neat shape, gets slated for lack of temp control but few fridges actually keep accurate temperature and it works fine anyway, tough as old boots, will not die. Also had a little 20l one which I ran as a freezer, not very compact but worked ace. National luna weekender 50, very nice size, about same outside dimensions as engel 40, great storage baskets, can properly keep a good supply of food/drink and able to access it without it all getting smashed. Loads of features. Pricey but nicey but I have had some with issues with circuit boards and coolant leaks, though after lots of harsh use. Generally very nicely put together, mercedes of fridges. National luna twin 50 - as above but with freezer compartment which is nice for chucking the weeks supply of meat in without getting blood soup in bottom of fridge, nice to have an ice cube for the g&t or chuck some lollies in. All the above have similar current draw, total power draw depends on insulation thickness (insulation jackets make a difference) and so does internal size & how much food is in there (so don't buy one bigger than you need). I've noticed some of the cheap modern compressor fridges (like the Bearmach one) suck quite a bit of juice. Tip on installation - if you cant connect the power lead directly to battery, keep the supply wires as short as possible and heavy guage, even a small 0.2v drop over the lead makes a big difference to how well the fridges work with the engine off, cigarett sockets for example are no good.
  5. They can be mated with an adaptor plate and reworked spigot bush - the gearbox will slot into existing holes in the chassis. Getting the clutch plate/arm/slave set up will be a fiddle but should be easy enough to find the best combo on the internet somewhere. I ran a 2.8 isuzu tdi with LT95 in a very heavy Range Rover and found the ratios were fine, can't see a 300tdi/LT95 in a 90 would struggle with the ratios.
  6. 70 odd miles a day in a Defender will probably get old pretty quick. Mrs Eightpot has a nice Saab 9-3 estate which is a nice looking modern classic, loads of room, super comfy, 150bhp, uses it for her 180 mile commute twice a week for the last 3 years, hardly spent a cent on it, does an easy 45+mpg and can pick them up for a few hundred bucks. I'd get something like that and save the rattler for the weekend 🙂
  7. If you want to go 2k, arrange to get 2 or 3 litres mixed up in advance as it works out cheaper and your bodyshop can draw what they need with less waste and you will have a consistent colour mix.
  8. Clearly you have been spared but only to suffer a worse fate. Never try to beat the system, you should have made efforts to snap the bolt as prescribed 🙁
  9. The stuff sold as enamel these days is 1k synthetic polyeurethane. It's main drawback versus 2k polyeurethane is the hardening time - hours v weeks. It's cheaper and safer to use though as no isocyanates. Once hardened, it's very tough. 1k poly is for industrial applications so only available in RAL and BS colours as a rule, no metalics. You can get it mixed in a close colour to factory paint with a colour match device from an auto paint shop. For a series LR that used BS paint colours, a green laner, ex mod etc synthetic is absolutely fine, for a smart modern defender you want to invest in & keep, go 2k.
  10. Namibia definitely one of my favourite places. You know you're in a different world standing next to Himba in a Spar 😄
  11. Aside from nicer switches, theres not much to gain really - surely some brighter bulbs or swapping the instruments out for VDO would save a load of hassle.. If I were going to retrofit a dash I'd go further back to S2/2a style, much smarter.
  12. Got one in the back of my 110 csw, great for camping and stuffing all the sleeping bags pillows and flumpy stuff on out of the way. I made my first one out of an old dog guard turned horizontal with four brackets welded on - if I hadn't already ordered a fancy one I'd have kept that, was every bit as good.
  13. For regular punctures, sticky tyre plugs work very well if you have a pump or compressor to air the tyre back up. Used them loads in Africa and just came across a wheel & tyre in the workshop I repaired with a plug in north Africa 14 years ago- still fully inflated. Used one of those plugs and a self tapper to fix a big fuel tank leak once as well - useful things to carry.
  14. I keep a 7.50 on the bonnet as it's good for an extra 3 mpg on the motorway 😄
  15. I've gone through a bunch of different cookers/burners, nowadays I just use a camping gaz 907 bottle with the camping gaz burner attachment screwed on - stable, plenty of heat, cheap, takes up little space, lasts ages, very portable. Surprising what you can do with one good burner.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy