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Td5 rebuild galvanising help


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Hi i am in the process of rebuilding my 06 td5 i have galvanised the chassis and the small parts around it (cross member, rear body bracket, etc) and was told i should galvanise my bulkhead too. Can anyone help what should be done as preparation and if it actually worth doing the bh? Was thinking of making a frame around it to brace it from the windscreen mounts and also all around to the chassis mounts so there is minimal distortion and flexing, also the galvanising company will have somewhere to lift from for the forklift.

What other parts can i galvanise too was thinking the brake mud shields, the spring saddles but dont know what else? 

Thanks in advance 

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"..was told i should galvanize my bulkhead too.." - this is entirely up to you.

Galvanizing helps slowing down the corrosion process and many consider it a good investment. As is doing this to other metal bits.

However, it requires good preparation and a plant that is serious about their work. Extra holes need to be drilled (14 mm or bigger) to avoid air pockets, grease, glue, plastic etc. must be removed and several people sandblast the metal for better adhesion.

Some people make a frame, some don't.

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Ralph managed to galvanise just about everything on his.

Preparing the bulkhead, drill some 6mm+ holes along the top where the seal for the wind screen frame sits to allow trapped air out and zinc in.  The frame is a good idea, at the very least brace the feet to keep their lateral distance constant, or it’ll bow and won’t fit the chassis.  If they can, have them lay the bulkhead over the galv tank to warm up gradually before dipping and again after dipping to cool more slowly - that minimises distortion.

If they get a nice finish, having the body cappings galvanised is a good idea. The circular spring seats and brake shields you mentioned, the battery tray from the seat base, the tubular braces to the bonnet slam panel, any brackets you can remove, sills, tub floor lateral braces, front wheel arch inners, front damper turrets, tow hitch drop plate and bracing bars, any light guards or side steps, bumper... anything made of steel that you can remove.  Some even have steel wheels galvanised, and if they’re really good at avoiding distortion, you could have the door frames dipped.

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I wouldn't even galvanize an original chassis, because there are so many overlaps and traps for the acid in it. The same in the bulkhead. A lot of sheet metal is double layered in it. No zinc will go there and acid in which the bulkhead is put before galvanizing will stay there.

If you do so, you will have to know exactly how it is built.

928098447_98erBulkheadvoninnen2.jpg.11952710f9d47fec7fb9f87febf07e7f.jpg

161497146_98erBulkheadvoninnen1.jpg.f41f0e3618439b7681814da39218cd2e.jpg

Oneten double layered

1998438718_BulkheadRostlochLftung1.thumb.jpg.1496b52fd72edae62001ea19b45eb4a4.jpg

Chassis part with acid trap

Rahmen_Detail.thumb.jpg.e4c748115304ce362e00f276d9080c73.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, Snagger said:

Ralph managed to galvanise just about everything on his.

Preparing the bulkhead, drill some 6mm+ holes along the top where the seal for the wind screen frame sits to allow trapped air out and zinc in.  The frame is a good idea, at the very least brace the feet to keep their lateral distance constant, or it’ll bow and won’t fit the chassis.  If they can, have them lay the bulkhead over the galv tank to warm up gradually before dipping and again after dipping to cool more slowly - that minimises distortion.

If they get a nice finish, having the body cappings galvanised is a good idea. The circular spring seats and brake shields you mentioned, the battery tray from the seat base, the tubular braces to the bonnet slam panel, any brackets you can remove, sills, tub floor lateral braces, front wheel arch inners, front damper turrets, tow hitch drop plate and bracing bars, any light guards or side steps, bumper... anything made of steel that you can remove.  Some even have steel wheels galvanised, and if they’re really good at avoiding distortion, you could have the door frames dipped.

All of my parts were bought new already galavinised, everything is in my chassis change post --- https://forums.lr4x4.com/topic/85416-new-chassis-for-my-1989-110/

 

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2 hours ago, Bowie69 said:

Once the chassis acid is finished eating rust, it will be neutralised, so won't cause any longer term issues, surely?

Imagine, how the procedure is done. The chassis will be submerged in the acid bath to eliminate rust. They let it in (nobody knows how long) until the OUTSIDE seems to be without rust. In the inside, capillary forces suck acid in overlaps and rust nests. Those nests can be quite big between stiffeners as you see in my pic.

Now they neutralize it. Again nobody knows how long and what is going to happen inside. Fact is the acid was there before and can stay there

Then it will be rinsed in water and then it will be galvanized.

Another question: What is going to happen with overlaps, when they are soaked full of water and get in the hot zinc bath? Are they spread because of the steam? Nobody knows.

This is why construction for galvanizing is so important. You can not galvanize things which are not constructed for that except electrolytically.

I am absolutely sure the companies doing bulkheads have there tricks

Edited by Sigi_H
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I appreciate that, I meant that once the acid 'runs out of acidity' it can't carry on eating the steel. 

Equally, I suspect that in a lot of cases they may well use an acid that only eats rust, and not the steel.

 

I appreciate the galvanising process is a hard one to get right, and the complexities of doing a bulkhead must be there, but plenty of people have done it without any reports of the sorts of problems you are talking about.

 

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15 minutes ago, Bowie69 said:

I appreciate the galvanising process is a hard one to get right, and the complexities of doing a bulkhead must be there, but plenty of people have done it without any reports of the sorts of problems you are talking about.

 

May be. Are you sure they report failures?

I believe you sure can make it fit, even if there was some failure. Galvanizing those old parts is not the best way, but it is a way for sure. And most important: These parts will possibly survive longer, than we do 😂

I just want to mention, where the traps are.

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Yeah absolutely, I am sure there have been failures!

Like you say, with a 25+year lifespan of galv before the elements get to the steel, and the elements need to get through whatever paint you stick on it as well, most of these components will outsee most of us!

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3 minutes ago, Bowie69 said:

Yeah absolutely, I am sure there have been failures!

Like you say, with a 25+year lifespan of galv before the elements get to the steel, and the elements need to get through whatever paint you stick on it as well, most of these components will outsee most of us!

I think you can give more. My Oneten is MY83 and the galv cappings are perfect. This is why I put no paint on my galvanised chassis. Looks perfect with the galvanized front bumper 👍

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