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Wood Burning Stove


Mark
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Having finally got doors and walls on my workshop, I decided it was time to try and add a bit of heat. It has been a tad nippy of late - you may have noticed - so this was quite a priority!

Anyway, the basic idea is to turn an old propane bottle into a wood burner. This is not a new idea, and I thank those whose designs I copied or at least took ideas from.

So here are a few build pics:

I wanted a flat top to the stove, so first I chopped the top off:

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Note, this cylinder had been venting for several weeks, upside down, and was purged two or 3 times with water before I attempted to cut it. It was also full of water while I was cutting it. The cylinder itself is ancient, and no longer a standard size, so only fit for scrap I believe (just in case any calor police are reading... )

Having emptied it, and provided a decent vent, I chopped a hole in the side:

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then added a hinge to the bit I chopped off:

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I put a chimney outlet in the back:

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The idea of the chimney being a bit further down the back was to try and create a hot area at the top, before all the smoke disappeared out the chimney.

I also cut a hole in the bottom:

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and built a simple control valve to be able to vary the air going in:

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I also added some legs, and some strip round the door:

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Next I cut out a circle of 6mm plate for the top with the plasma cutter:

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and stuck it on:

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I had planned to just have a solid top, but since I plan to burn mostly waste wood, I wanted to be able to poke long bits in as required. This meant I had to cut a section off the disc, so that I could have a removable section:

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I added a grate in the bottom:

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This is in 2 halfs so it can be removed for cleaning, and just rests on the bead that joins the cylinder to the end cap. It is made from 12mm square bar.

Next I put it in place and installed some stainless flexible flue piping as chimney:

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This continues up the outside of the building for a while and has a cover over the end to stop any prevailing weather getting down it...

So all that was left was to set light to it and enjoy the cosy warmth.... :)

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Thought some people might like to see it being built. It has been covered before on here by simonr I and several others I think, but another one never hurts. It is not especially pretty, and the welding is pretty rough and ready, but so long as it allows me stay slightly warmer while I am working, it doesn't matter..

Cheers

Mark

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I like it , a lot, I especially like the flat top, never thought of coming out of the side , and as you say, it will heat the top up better, think I'll make two, small one first for inside the shed and a big one for outside in the yard, better than just an oil drum because it diverts the stinking smoke, but still radiates some nice heat.

Brian

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Lawrence,

Yep, pretty easy fab-wise, and pretty cheap too - a lot of the material came from the scrap. The 12mm square bar I bought though as you need a surprising amount!

Our local Metal recycling place has a cage full of dead bottles, otherwise any farmer worth his salt will have one lying in a hedge somewhere I would have thought. I made a barbeque out of one I found in a hedge in Guildford....

Our local council tip has a cage too, but they may frown upon giving bottles away. Some places do some don't...

Mark

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No - the bought stoves I have had have a baffle plate that partially covers the flu hole on the inside of the boiler.

Its angled and fitted around the bottom half of the flu hole in the 'fire chamber' so to speak. Its so that the flames and smoke hit it and it absorbs the heat before the draught pulls the smoke round it and up through the flu.

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So far no, the lid seems fairly smoke proof. When it is first lit, it is a bit smokey, but once you get a bit of draw through it is fairly clean. It is even pretty safe to lift the lid (with a tool, not a hand!) without getting a face full of smoke.

thanks for the comments.

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Nice job there Mark , I did one a few years ago , Using waste oil on a drip feed to power it , It glowed cherry red after about an hour and worked a treat , Sadly Mr HSE walked in ,Saw it and had a right head fit , so It had to go . But it was at work. At home its an ideal and cheap solution .

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SVA police appearing again (sorry I haven't got a wood burner one)

post-784-1234812650_thumb.jpg

Obviously the physical installation or the wood burner itself needs to comply with safety and building regulations. Also, you might need planning permission to fit a twin wall flue if you don’t already have a flue or suitable chimney. And of course, with recent Climate Change legislation you might also need to establish compliance with the Building Regulations Part L - Conservation of fuel and power (the UK implementation of the EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive).

If you plan to install a wood burning boiler or stove in an urban environment in general, or are located in a smokeless zone, you will need to check which regulations apply, what exemptions might also apply and consider specially approved wood burning stoves that have been designed to comply with the Clean Air Act with regard to particulate pollution. In the UK you can easily check the location of Smoke Control Areas and also which types of wood burning appliances and specific fuels are exempt.

In the UK, you can go your own way and apply to your local authority building control department for a building notice which will cost anything up to about £300. Upon completion of your wood burner installation, you will also have to notify the authority who will inspect your installation to ensure it is fully compliant with building regulations. Failure to comply can lead to enforcement and serious problems for future house sale and can be unpleasantly expensive to rectify.

Hat and coat...............

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SVA police appearing again (sorry I haven't got a wood burner one)

post-784-1234812650_thumb.jpg

Obviously the physical installation or the wood burner itself needs to comply with safety and building regulations. Also, you might need planning permission to fit a twin wall flue if you don't already have a flue or suitable chimney. And of course, with recent Climate Change legislation you might also need to establish compliance with the Building Regulations Part L - Conservation of fuel and power (the UK implementation of the EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive).

If you plan to install a wood burning boiler or stove in an urban environment in general, or are located in a smokeless zone, you will need to check which regulations apply, what exemptions might also apply and consider specially approved wood burning stoves that have been designed to comply with the Clean Air Act with regard to particulate pollution. In the UK you can easily check the location of Smoke Control Areas and also which types of wood burning appliances and specific fuels are exempt.

In the UK, you can go your own way and apply to your local authority building control department for a building notice which will cost anything up to about £300. Upon completion of your wood burner installation, you will also have to notify the authority who will inspect your installation to ensure it is fully compliant with building regulations. Failure to comply can lead to enforcement and serious problems for future house sale and can be unpleasantly expensive to rectify.

Hat and coat...............

when i get my country retreat i will have a wood buring stove to heat the manor :lol:

i think it's a primordial urge to have a fire.

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the yard where i did a course had one in their break area which was a smaller one cut down and proceeded to show us how to fry eggs directly on the steel plate on the top. it was polished up nicely, and the logs were fed in the front. but it were well good.

id make one, cept i dont actually have anywhere to put it!

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SVA police appearing again (sorry I haven't got a wood burner one)

post-784-1234812650_thumb.jpg

<snip>

Hat and coat...............

Lol, I wonder if we should have a sva smilie???

anyway, urban this most certianly isn't - you can't actually see any other houses from this place!

and anyway, the inspector would be busily having a fit that I did all my own single and three phase electrics to worry about the wood burner! :P

;)

Mark

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