Maverik

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Maverik last won the day on February 17

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About Maverik

  • Rank
    In constant need of Instant Mechanical Gratification!
  • Birthday 01/28/1983

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    Aberdeenshire
  1. Just simply park your truck up and pop the hi/low stick into the centre point of the H like the picture says: Then just slowly run the truck up through the gears, you can then listen to see if the noise is still there, what this does is effectively tells you fn the noise is coming from the gearbox or the "top" side of the transfer box. if the noise is not there when you do this, it means its either the output bearings on the transfer box or UJ's or diff or hubs etc, which there are other testing you can then do to find out if the rest are ok.
  2. If the noise is still there when the transfer box is in neutral, you can rule out any issues with your diff's prop shafts cv's, hubs, transfer box output bearings etc etc.... in which case you're looking at internal gearbox bearings and internal transfer box bearings, or engine related, but low rumbling usually points to an unhappy bearing in your transmission. So maybe a few avenues for you to explore now are, change the oil in the Transfer box and Gear box, see if it improves, or if the oil is already new I'd be looking at is either removing the sump hatch on the transfer box or removing the input gear hatch on the transfer box, pull the gear and have a look at the bearings, also inspect the gears for wear/corrosion. you can also give the gearbox output shaft a wiggle see if that feels ok. Further steps out with above would be to remove gearbox or transfer box and swap with a known good ones... If the noise goes away when TB is in neutral, you can now concentrate on everything "south" of the intermediate gear in your transfer box, I'd recommend you try take a systematic approach starting at the transfer box output flanges, checking props, then diffs then axle ends then hubs. A bit tedious, but tries to get around the shooting from the hip and trying to randomly guess where the problem is.
  3. You get Cummins a lot in the smaller range of marine diesel generators, they have a good reputation for being pretty robust and easily serviceable, with parts generally available in most places, looks quite a tidy set-up. How big's your fleet? - I guess making a small batch of adaptor plates and conversion kits looks more cost effective than doing a single unit. The Australians used a 3.9ltr Isuzu unit in there army trucks and 6x6 trucks, could maybe be an option for you.
  4. DOH... ok brain fart, now I re-read it yes vehicle registration number... I assumed it would be something like a warranty number or summet... thanks for clearing that up...
  5. Si, if you're reading, did you provide a warranty type card thingy when you where selling them directly? wouldn't mind receiving an upgrade but I honestly can't remember any numbers etc Cheers Mav
  6. I generally do mine every two years, but depends on what it looks like really, give it a good blast with a pressure washer then scrap anything which looks dubious then re-coat.
  7. Have you tied putting the Transfer box in neutral and going up through the gears, this will allow you hopefully to rules out the top end of transfer box and gearbox/engine related bearings etc...
  8. Going on from a conversation started here, thought I'd dedicate this new thread to the developments of said heater modifications. http://forums.lr4x4.com/topic/84583-87-90-4c/?page=9 So for any fettlers out there, I found these on fleebay being spare heater fan rotors (no motor) I just bought a couple for some experimentation. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/182417405154?_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT I'm presently modifying a Disco 1 fan to fit the Defender hole, will post some pictures up when I've completed it.
  9. Me too, bathe in WD40 until you can get them changed out. I also had a strange issue that my tack bar started to catch on the bracket under the diff caused some weird feeling steering for a while until I straightened it out.
  10. The effect of fitting one of these springs is that you will feel the clutch pedal as being lighter.
  11. This is not exactly true, the spring "inverts" once it gets over a certain point so helps to push the pedal then on returning it goes over the centre point and helps return the pedal to the up position. After I broke my hip I removed the old return spring and installed the later style coil spring (luckily I had replaced the pedal before with the newer single pressed type) - I commute daily in my truck and it made an amazing difference! I'm 26 months down the line from my hip surgery, and my leg is fine with the clutch. When I was still laid up in bed I actually bought a servo system as like you I was pretty worried about how I would be able to keep driving my truck, it wasn't a red rooster one, but a system commonly used on classic cars to add servo assist to brakes, I've still got it in a box in my garage. Anywhoo, you'll be over the moon with upgrading the spring to the new type, it totally transforms the drive. Swapping the pedal out isn't such a huge job.
  12. Not mine but don't half look bad... http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/122355248963
  13. I've got a "Double S exhaust" and its rubbish, poor quality boxes that are full of glass fibre - it melted and turned to pebbles in my rear box and rattled like hell, also the flange joints are only mild steel and the actual tubing must be such a low grade of stainless you'd never guess it actually was a Stainless exhaust. I'm going to make my own next time!
  14. Nice idea but not particularly a fan, as Les says, how often do you bleed the clutch? blue moon comes into mind, I can only see it introducing more pipework for failure and trapping of air? So have you done this conversion? Mav