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Military 24V Alternator Belts


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Last year my company imported 3 military spec Land Rover Defenders into Japan. I've now got the task of getting them running and on the road. All of the vehicles have an issue with loose belts, so as part of the service I want to replace all of them.

1987 Defender 110 (24V)

2.5 NA Diesel

I previously purchased a load of servicable parts from John Craddock in the UK including a set of belts. But unforunately they seem different to what is currently on each vehicle. To save confusion can anyone provide part numbers or a diagram for these belts?

 

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Standard V belts can be bought in any size if you measure them you can just buy the right side & width from almost any car parts shop. 11mm or 13mm are common widths for single-vee I think.

They usually have codes - my V8 polyvee belt is 7PK1870 - 7 grooves, 1870mm long - a lot of the time it's printed on the back of the belt.

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  • 4 weeks later...

The vehicle is ex Singapore military so the belts have been replaced with alternative brands, unfortunately one of the belts is badly worn without any markings visable. Is there an additional parts number manual for the military vehicles?

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Unfortunately I just sold my own 1987 ex-military 110 so can't help that much.  I ended up changing things around a lot anyway - replaced the 24v system and installed a 100 amp alternator in an altered location and replaced the vacuum pump (good luck finding parts for that!) with a 300Tdi one that runs off the "distributor drive".  Generally, I just took the old belts to a specialist shop and they measured and matched it.  However, the power steering belt is odd.  It's like a half inch size between two standard sizes, which is a pain.  My parts manual has ETC5815 for that but I doubt it's the proper one for an 18J motor like yours.  Might be a starting point though.  Good luck.

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@deep I was actually going to send you a message after seeing some pictures of your vehicle. The layout of the belts looked identical. Just wondering if there's a mechanic's manual for the military vehicles.

Failing that I will remove the belts and measure. Added complication of trying to find parts in Japan for 3 vehicles...

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10 hours ago, danicklin said:

@deep I was actually going to send you a message after seeing some pictures of your vehicle. The layout of the belts looked identical. Just wondering if there's a mechanic's manual for the military vehicles.

Failing that I will remove the belts and measure. Added complication of trying to find parts in Japan for 3 vehicles...

I think my old 110 and your ones were/are essentially the same, with 24 volt generator instead of an alternator and a belt-driven vacuum pump (missing on the diagramme above).  That's why I assumed you had the 18J engines, not the more common 12J version.  

You can get a gadget that measures belts properly.  It has a semi circle on either end, with a groove for the belt, separated by an expandable frame.  You put your belt on it and pull it out until the belt is tight and it has a scale to give you the correct size to order.  You still need to know the thickness of the belt (which is an A or B in the belt number) but that will be easy to measure.  A lot of older garages have them.  If you could borrow or find one, it will make belt ordering pretty simple.  Alternatively, find a military specialist in the UK, or maybe a military vehicle dismantler in Singapore (where many of these have come from) and see if they have the correct part number.  It's all factory standard, just not mass market, or even military mass market!

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No special measuring tool needed - just run a piece of string round the outside of the belt and pick the one that's closest to that length... even if it's a little bit out that's what the belt adjuster is for ;) but usually there's a fairly obvious matching part.

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Hi Dan - this is probably the best pic I have of the layout of the engine belts, I'd be interested to know if yours is the same?

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From what I have, the alternator belt has no markings, The other two are shown here if that's any help

 

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I'll be interested to know how you gwt on

Phill

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4A1100 is a standard belt code so should be easy to find - it even gives its measurement (17.5x1100L) right next to it.

A google image search of the part number for the other one might throw up the universal code visible in a picture.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks for the useful information in finding the correct replacement belts. Our vehicles definitely have the same belt arrangement. I guess as these vehicle were in service in Singapore they used different replacement belts.

Water Pump - Mitsuboshi RECMF8420

Alternator - Bando RPF5490

Vacuum - Mitsuboshi RECMF1325

I've had to remove the belts from all 3 vehicles to find the part numbers. Managed to get a few replacement belts but the alternator is proving difficult, cant find anywhere to buy the belt here despite having the part number.

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That Bando belt has the dimensions written right next to where you got the part number, 17mm wide and 1220mm long, and place will be able to match that up for you. 

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Completely unrelated to the belt question but curious how many others have an ex Singapore vehicle. I have a 110 ambulance and have been searching for more information on wiring/ parts etc as I have a 200tdi engine I want to put in it and hopefully convert it to 12v. 

 

Side note weird stuff about the ex Singapore versions. 1. The glowplugs(at least on mine) are standard 12v. The red relay on the bulkhead is 24v fed from ignition to activate relay but the feed is 12v to plugs. 2. There is no heater in them. The box is there but it has no heater matrix and is missing the coolant hoses to connect to a matrix if you add one.(the metal pipes are no longer made so you have to make your own out of copper). 3. All gauges, bulbs relays are 24v, they are also the only land rover I have found that has otter circuit breaker/relays in and I can't find more info about otter circuit breakers.

 

Anyway that's my brain dump of what I have learned while taking bits off mine and tracing cables. Would love to get a group of folks who ha e ex Singapore land rovers to help cross reference and troubleshoot the weirdness of them.

 

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There have been a lot imported into New Zealand.  Some were fantastic, some were a bit rusty.  Mine (sold a few months ago, sob) had an as-new chassis and lots of new stuff but was partly dismantled.  The previous owner had ripped out much of the 24v wiring loom and supplied a 12v one which turned out to be out of four cylinder petrol model, which caused some confusion.  

I never even thought about the glow plugs possibly being 24 volt.  They used to take a long time to start glowing (up to 20 seconds on a bench) but worked well enough.  The rest of the wiring was bit of a mix, so it just had a normal (old and annoying but easy to fix) fuse box.  Can't help with circuit breakers, sorry.  I replaced all the normal bulbs, even the dashboard ones, but left the convoy lighting alone (I tested it but never wired the original switch back in).  That was easy enough.  The voltmeter still read accurately but the temperature gauge always read very high (tested with a thermometer so I wasn't worried).  I never worked out where to connect the oil pressure gauge to so left that alone.

I fitted a heater easily enough but just ran two rubber hoses out to the side and tied them to the inlet manifold.  No metal pipes needed.  Six years later, all good.

Personally, I think these particular Land Rovers are real gems, as long as you don't want  to keep them absolutely original.  Some original parts, like the vacuum pump, are tricky to find and 24 volt electrics aren't as easy when you're dealing with bulbs and batteries.  On the other hand, you get that lovely, basic four pot diesel with power steering and wind up windows.  Quite enough refinement!

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Yeah im a big fan of mine. The chassis is in near perfect condition and I'm only swapping out the engine because I got a decent 200tdi with full service history from new. Speaking of brake vacuum pump if someone is looking to replace it the land rover Sanata pump the closest/easiest replacement. Unless you can find a cheap 2.5na vacuum pump that will bolt straight in in it's original position like the British 2.5na setup. The main thing I would love to get my hands on is a wiring diagram for the Singapore variation because some of the wiring I just can't figure out!(suppose it doesn't help that mine is a 110 ambulance variation)

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