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gavfurn

cheap modifacations

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Clean all the contacts, make sure the bulbs are clean, make sure its got good earth, and perhaps upgrade the wiring with brand new fused feeds direct from the battery, controlled by relays activated by the exisiting wiring. That alone made a huge difference to the headlights on my 88"

By any chance would you have a wiring diagram for the circuit you made Mr. Parrott???

This was something a mechanic friend of mine did to a customers car to overcome an issue with it killing switches when selecting high beam, he said back then(gotta be more than 15yrs ago now) it was something found on MGs or something like that.

Would just say another vote for interior lighting upgrade to LEDs and do the dash lights too, not sure what the rear light arrangement is on your truck but having stop/tail and indicators in the body and bumper is also worth thinking about as you can never have enough rear facing lights, perhaps you could also fit a high level brake light too?

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This was something a mechanic friend of mine did to a customers car to overcome an issue with it killing switches when selecting high beam,

Thats why I did it.

I've not got a wiring diagram but its fairly simple. I have a relay which is ignition controlled, so that if I take the key out high load items like the lights can't be left on. I've got 2 fused supplies taken off that run forward to the slam panel feeding relays, with an earth wire too. Relays are earthed as normal, to the new wire plus the slam panel (can never have enough earths!). The normal headlight feed from the switch becomes the switching wire for the relay, just as you normally would, and then the load is the headlights, and goes to the usual load terminal. The earths from the headlights are fed in to the additional earth wire.

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Thats why I did it.

I've not got a wiring diagram but its fairly simple. I have a relay which is ignition controlled, so that if I take the key out high load items like the lights can't be left on. I've got 2 fused supplies taken off that run forward to the slam panel feeding relays, with an earth wire too. Relays are earthed as normal, to the new wire plus the slam panel (can never have enough earths!). The normal headlight feed from the switch becomes the switching wire for the relay, just as you normally would, and then the load is the headlights, and goes to the usual load terminal. The earths from the headlights are fed in to the additional earth wire.

TOP!!!!

Thanks for that, will try and draw it out in lines so I have a better idea before I do it on my truck although will most likely be done after I have finished welding up and painting the inner wheel arches and light boxes.

Many thanks :i-m_so_happy:

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I agree with most that say make it reliable, use it then decide what direction you want to head. My 300tdi is a daily driver which doesnt mean it cant be a capable offroad vehicle as well, had mine for 7 years and has gradually gone from stock to how it is now, next mod is a VNT turbo upgrade which has brought me here to search.

IMG_7792.JPG

IMG_7793.JPG

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It is quite simply staggering what a standard 4x4 is capable of. LRs especially so.

There does seem to be a trend to bolting on extra goodies for little other reason than it looks good. You aren't going to need a lift, knobbly tyres, a snorkle or a sticker that says "One life, Live it" for green laning - even the difficult ones.

I'd do what Tanuki suggests - make it a good solid reliable vehicle first. Then take it out, see what it'll do (and what you can make it do) and if you want to push it further then, and only then, start upgrading things.

First on my list would be tyres - unless you're going to bury it up to the bonnet in mud you don't need anything more than a good set of ATs. Anything more aggressive will severely compromise road handling and just rip up the green lanes.

Sorry I don't agree with this. A good set of MT's need not ruin the road manners and may well be more friendly to lanes. e.g.

You might be able to tick along with MT's on and hardly spin a wheel. While the vehicle on the AT's is having to give it hell for leather with massive wheelspin just to make progress. Driving like this also increases the chance of hitting something too.

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hi fellas,

i've had my disco for a bit now, bog standard.

i'm looking to start the mods, any suggestions where to start?? and cheapest?

not cheapest parts but mods, then work my way up,

many thanks gav

There are many mods you can do. And many that won't hurt driving training. I'm not fully convinced you should drive a completely stock truck just to prove how macho you are. I've seen plenty of ill prepared vehicles either fail to get from place to place, suffer huge damage or just cause a lot of bother for others in needing recovery.

On the other hand, I do believe in researching and fully understanding every mod before you do it. This way you know if you really need it and what it is trying to attain.

With a Disco for off road use I'd look to reducing damage. This means front and rear bumpers and body work.

Depending on the terrain you drive on, you may want to consider some sill bars/rock sliders, as bashing up the sill and lower doors is no fun and not easy to repair.

The front bumper you can remove the bumper end caps and front spoiler and similar on the rear. I would also trim the rear arch as it's only going to get bent and mangled off road. So do a tidy mod on it now with a jig saw and avoid the bent and crumpled metal later on.

And tyres tyres tyres!!! Off roading on rubbish tyres is IMO one of the worst things to do and is very inconsiderate to other off roaders.

There are plenty of mild MT's about that will ride perfectly fine on the road, such as Toyo's, BFG's, K71's and many others. Although many more aggressive remould MT's can be perfectly fine on road too.

You don't need a lift, in fact don't get a lift until why you know you want one. It'd be nice to fit some 235/85R16 tyres on a Disco, but you'll have to lift or trim to do this. Personally I'd trim the aches. But don't lift it until you know why you are lifting it and what you want from it. Buy smaller tyres if need be to avoid this.

Lights are an easy upgrade with higher wattage bulbs or the higer output ones sold by Phillips & Halfords.

Being a Tdi you can also tweak the injector pump to make a bit more power if you want too.

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TOP!!!!

Thanks for that, will try and draw it out in lines so I have a better idea before I do it on my truck although will most likely be done after I have finished welding up and painting the inner wheel arches and light boxes.

Many thanks :i-m_so_happy:

I think if I'm reading it right, all you need to do is wire in the headlights as though you would for some aftermarket spot lights. The only difference is you are using the dip beam, not main beam circuit to activate it.

You do this as it firstly means the actual power going to the lights doesn't have to pass through the physical light switch. Which could burn out under higher load, but also cause resistance, meaning less actual power to the bulbs.

Secondly to have a more efficient wiring setup to the bulbs. The stock wiring when new really wasn't designed for high load and has many connectors and points of resistance, along with a small gauge wire. By passing all of this means you'll get more power the bulbs and they'll illuminate brighter.

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Rev limiter???

He runs a 3.9 V8 EFI, they have one of them ;)

Exactly right with the wiring up of the lights, it allows a path of greater current and a lot less resistance in providing power to the lamps and just turns the feed from the switch into a trigger wire to the relay.

I actually disagree with the tyre subject but it is often a matter of personal opinion, I watched many green lanes get TRO'd with the help of mud junkies and their aggressive tyres churning them up as it was too long to wait for the next P&P day, and therefore I would say it was wise to match the tyre to the application, if it is too slippery and rough going on a green lane for a set of A/T tyres then you really shouldn't be driving them, also I would not advocate nipping out and fitting some road rubber to visit P&P sites.

I suppose it would be more dependent on how experienced the OP was in driving off road as to whether he would be taking chances driving in areas where he was not suitably equipped tyre wise, but this can also be said for those that get busy fitting winches and the like without first realizing that perhaps there is a better route that does not require them, I would say it better to learn how it handles off road with A/T tyres and learn what your own capabilities are before sizing up a set of MAXXIS boggers, sometimes it is better to get stuck early on than getting into bigger difficulties where getting back out can be even harder.

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Off Road wise, my series 3 is pretty much standard,

okay, it has a 200Tdi, disk brakes on the front and parabolic springs, but in terms of axles, tyres, im pretty much standard, and on par flex wise with a standard coiler with +2 shocks

A set of 235/85 goodyear wranglers, is all i have in terms of extra grip from standard, these are by no means extreme, but i still manage to do pretty well, better than those on 35 and 37" tyres in some situations, the following being a pretty good example (the blue series 3 pickup in these)

especially as i tug out a hilux from a ditch only afterwards realising i left it in 2 wheel drive... :rolleyes:

and finally this rather amusing video just shows how a 6L diesel, twin lockers and 37" tyres arent all that, especially if you dont know how to use it!!!

so basically, my point, along with others, is dont go straight for the million inch lift and 80" tyres, learn to drive first, the old saying is very apt aswell,

go as slow as you can but as fast as you need.

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He runs a 3.9 V8 EFI, they have one of them ;)

Really? I thought they just stopped going any higher when the hydraulic tappets stopped operating...

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Yes due to the low profile cam of a stock RV8 I can't see a rev limiter being an issue. It'll have done most of its work well before 5000rpm I'd have thought.

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Frankly I wasn't aware the ecu was actually conscious to the fact of what rpm the engine was actually doing, I thought it just bank fired alternately when it got the green light from the coil.

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Yes due to the low profile cam of a stock RV8 I can't see a rev limiter being an issue. It'll have done most of its work well before 5000rpm I'd have thought.

I'd have thought so too, never understand why some people thrash their V8's (apart form the noise), it's like trying to make a shire horse gallop.

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It's part of the distributor mechanism. Once above a certain rpm, it stop firing the coil.

Have you any more info on this? It is the first I have ever heard of it, so genuinely interested :)

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No I don't actually. It's just something that I've always understood - something to do with the bobweights moving some part which quits sending pulses to the coil. I presume later models with ignition amps etc would implement it differently.

Anyone else care to shed some light?

[awaiting someone to tell me I'm talking out of my arse]

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it's like trying to make a shire horse gallop.

Done that......mighty impressive...but you don't want to be in front of it!

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No I don't actually. It's just something that I've always understood - something to do with the bobweights moving some part which quits sending pulses to the coil. I presume later models with ignition amps etc would implement it differently.

Anyone else care to shed some light?

[awaiting someone to tell me I'm talking out of my arse]

Never knew how it worked just knew it had one!

Now as far as a GEMS engine goes than that must be ECU controlled as it is dizzy-less and as for overcoming any limitations I think by squirting/jolting you could get round that issue, not so sure I would want to though TBH!!!

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Even when it was on a dizzy, I saw 5500rpm in my 3.9, so I just thought it had none...

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yes, yes. v8's are very nice. very revvy. yes.

i think replacing the front exhaust section with a decat pipe can be considered a cheap mod, especially if you weigh in the cat at the scrappy. that and unplugging the egr (or removing the thing with a kit) should do a bit for performance. or so they tells me...

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Off Road wise, my series 3 is pretty much standard,

okay, it has a 200Tdi, disk brakes on the front and parabolic springs, but in terms of axles, tyres, im pretty much standard, and on par flex wise with a standard coiler with +2 shocks

A set of 235/85 goodyear wranglers, is all i have in terms of extra grip from standard, these are by no means extreme, but i still manage to do pretty well, better than those on 35 and 37" tyres in some situations, the following being a pretty good example (the blue series 3 pickup in these)

especially as i tug out a hilux from a ditch only afterwards realising i left it in 2 wheel drive... :rolleyes:

and finally this rather amusing video just shows how a 6L diesel, twin lockers and 37" tyres arent all that, especially if you dont know how to use it!!!

so basically, my point, along with others, is dont go straight for the million inch lift and 80" tyres, learn to drive first, the old saying is very apt aswell,

go as slow as you can but as fast as you need.

Watching those vids brought back many a fond memory of my old LWB with it's 2.6 6cyl petrol engine and doing a few lanes and a couple of P&P days with it when it still had Avon Rnage Master tyres that were 3 parts worn out LOL then a new set of General SAG radials came when I knew what it's capabilities were with rubbish rubber on, OK that was a lot more tame than what I did with my first RRC 4 door, but then again my circumstances changed the mud plugging RRC with it's 35" tyres went as I got married and grew up, the series came back as a toy/hobby, but a series as you will know is a far cry from a RRC hence why I got to know how it went properly, it never did get anything more than the SAGs and just well maintained, it simply did everything I asked of it straight out of the tin :)

Going to be a lot more adventurous with my Discovery hence the rather more extensive mods being devised.

But seriously want to thank you for the last vid of the purple one getting a little urm...... cross eyed shall we say :lol:

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I have always thought if you learn to drive your truck first as standard you will know exactly what you need to fit. I personally have never felt the need for a lift at all on either series or my old.disco. Others may do. Its all down to driving style too.

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I always found myself torn between my own inner desire to push the boundaries and the well taught lessons from working on the farm, when I worked on a small mixed farm money was always tight and there just was not surplus funds for coverage of damages due to incompetence or negligence so you learned that everything has to drive another day and the more land covered the less costs and profits meant possibly newer machinery at the end of the year, and I learned that through driving sensibly I could do more P&P days and laning each year as I was not busy fixing it or short of cash after replacing broken parts.

I suppose I now just want to be able to do more in my own truck than I did with the series, in a sense I am not building a challenge truck just one that will go where I want without breaking anything, and if I do get over ambitious then I want the means to get myself back out of the muddle.

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i have a very similar past to you, a small (hilly peak district) working dairy farm, (now tourist and beef farm) and have been driving since i was a wee nipper. i learned to drive in a hilux at 6 on dads knee, driven quadbikes since then, and had my first series 3 at 13, in standard form. i didnt really do much proper off roading, more pootling about.

i got a 110 after that and started getting more confident, by 16 i was on my third land rover and after putting some insa turbos on it, i would try pretty much anything. not trying to sound snooty at all but you can tell the difference in skill level between poeple such as farmers and farm workers, who have had to drive off road for a living, than others a similar age who have been driving on the road as long, but maybe started off roading as a hobby after that.

and Nigel, you are doing exactly what i think poeple should do. match your truck to your needs after gaining the experience, not just kit it out with all the bells and whistles straight away just for a few pay and play sites.

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