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Do tyres need to be put on rims by professionals?


Mean Green
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I have 4 tyres that I need putting on rims.

The rims that I have already have valves in them and they are only going to be used to store a vehicle on so dont need balanced.

I have an air compressor so I can pump the tyres up ok. But is there anything to stop me putting them onto the rims myself?

Or should I squander the few quid and get my tyre man to do it?

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You can do it but it can be hard work. You will need 2 tyre levers as a minimum and, if you can get some, some proper lube for the beads. You can use washing-up liquid but that has salt in and you know what that causes!

Chris

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And the necessary gear to get the tyre expanded right to the edge of the rim so it will contain the air. Or you could use lighter fluid and match if your feeling risky?

Spend a few quid for loads less hassle ;)

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It's very hard work doing it by hand. Keeping the rim still while you get the tyre on is bluddy murder. Also getting the initial seal to start inflating is hard too, especially if the tyres are new or second hand ones that have been stacked flat for any length of time. Second hand tyres are still swollen from when they have previously been inflated, whereas new are skinny and flat.

I'd much rather pay £5 each to get tyres put on rims than do it myself.

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From taking off and putting new tyres on to kart wheels, i would imagine that going a landy tyre would be just a bigger version and i would have to say for what it would cost for someone else to do it i would take it to a tyre place or local garage and just tell them you need the tyre on the wheel only, would have probably even considered taking it to Kwik Fit

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I nearly always do my own 4x4 tyres, have done for years as I usually buy tyres mail order. I have a great deal of experience changing tyres/repairing punctures in the middle of no where, so I am happy to do my own.

It is quite a 'physical' task as has been said. Tubeless tyres can be difficult to 'seat' if you don't have a compressor with enough puff. Unscrewing and removing the valve core will let air in faster which helps seat the beads, and sometimes you may need a ratchet strap around the circumference of the tyre to help get the beads closer to the rim. Don't forget to remove the ratchet strap once the air stops leaking from the bead area!

You will need to lubricate the tyre beads. Simplest is to use a ph neutral liquid hand soap and a paint brush, or use a nice soggy bar of ph neutral soap, a bit of water and a paintbrush to work up a lather.

Some tyres are easier to fit/remove than others, you never no how hard til you try.

If you don't fancy it, pay someone, It could save you a few sprains and bruises!

Have a ring round first, or go and talk to the fitters. Some tyre places will refuse to fit customer supplied tyres, others will insist that they are all properly balanced, new valves etc and charge you accordingly! This is sometimes because they are scared of any comebacks if there are problems. Some will do it for a couple of quid in their lunch break or whatever.

Regards,

Diff

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I always do my own. Never had a problem.

However I have to say that there is definately a knack to it - once you've got it its easy. If you've not got it you can struggle for hours!

I find a quick squirt of WD40 is enough lube.

I just use a couple of pry bars as i dont have any tyre levers.

Jon

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I do my own but then I sell tyres as work so I have a nice electric/pneumatic tyre changer to use. If I had to do them with tyre levers I wouldn't bother.

Note that it REALLY depends on the type of wheel rim. Tubed tyres onto an old Defender steel wheel with a nice deep wheel well, easy as you like even with tyre levers because the opposite side of the bead goes deep in to the well so it is never very tight. Try putting the same tyre onto some of the new alloys where the wheel well is about 1/2 inch deep, forget it, it is damn near impossible with anything other than the proper kit and even then it can be a fight sometimes if you don't get it just right.

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Ah........meant to add I've only ever done steelies!!! Would try it with alloys anyway as they'd get scratched to hell......

They do!

...and if you get rough on an alloy rim with tyre levers you WILL bend the edge of the rim!

If you HAVE to change tyres on alloys with tyre levers then a good trick is to get some plastic pipe about 3/4" in diameter, cut a piece off about six inches long and split it down one side, open it up and put it around the edge of the rim then use the tyre lever on that. Helps a bit... as does a gallon of lubricant.

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i've done my own, using soap as a lubricant, its easy if you've got a big compressor to seat it back on the rim properly, otherwise it can be a bit tricky..

the farmer who lives next door to my Dad does them for me now, £5 inc balancing, so no need to bother myself anymore...

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