Jump to content

Please can those who know expalin the differences ?


Hybrid_From_Hell
 Share

Recommended Posts

can't explain the difference in use, but the difference in technology is thus:

1. Stove enamelling is a method of curing paint to a substrate- in the past these were oil baed paints but are now more likely to be acrylic based. The baking of the enamel allows thick coats to be applied yet leave an easthetically pleasing finish which is highly durable to wear and heat- often used on items such as model steam trains and the like. What stove enamelling is doing is speeding up the curing process, in contrast to:

2. Powder coating- in this process it is the heat itself which attachs the powder coat to the substrate. Applied electrostatically to the metal the powder coat (being negatively charged) sticks to any postively charged metal. This coated metal is tehn baked at temperature to effectively melt the coating to the metal.

In practice the two techniques look very very similar- both are preceeded by the necessity of very good cleaning- often shotblasting and certainly degreasing. They are then coated and in the type of coating and then baked. Enamelling is often baked at a higher temperature than powder coating (often high enough to melt solder) and teh finish is one of very high gloss. One of the benefits of stove enameling is that chips can be easily re-touched with the same paint work. Ali can be enameled but needs alocroming first- a process which chemically alters the surface of the aluminium and allows it to be painted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can explain a little about the practical side.. in use.

We supply a lot of coated metal plant at work, for Navy applications, we generally hate powder coat as it can chip easily, is impossible to touch up and once it has chipped, water will get under the surface and rust will take hold everywhere.

We prefer either stove enamelled or two-pack epoxy finishes as they are more durable, and can be touched up after the shipyard have chipped it.

I wouldn't use powder coat on stuff going on my landy unless it was zinc coated first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When we did powder coating at school years ago, we had to heat the metal up first so that it was basicly glowing then the powder was blown over it and melted on contact with the hot metal.

I would have thought that baking would be painting the enamel on then baking it after.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When we did powder coating at school years ago, we had to heat the metal up first so that it was basicly glowing then the powder was blown over it and melted on contact with the hot metal.

I would have thought that baking would be painting the enamel on then baking it after.

that's the hobbiest's way of doing it- although not ineffective it doesn't allow such depth of powder coat. i used to have a big box which you blew air into thus lifting the powder coat and allowing you ti dip the hot metal right into it.

i like the look of stove enamelling but it might be a bit bling to have a really shiny gloss roll cage!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, just to hijack Mr From Hell's post completely, if someone wanted to coat the rusty springs on their Unimog, the best option would be to shot blast them, then...? 2 pack epoxy? (Is that a dip, or a spray?).

Anywhere in Hampshire that does it cheapish?

Ta, Al (Sorry Mr From Hell) :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nige

I don't know to much about stove enammeling other than its tougher than powder coating - we don't use it much - a type is used on sinks etc

With regards to powder coating - we use it alot on ali and steel - and agree with above it can be chipped easily and will rust if the base metal is not galvanised

We tend to powder coat onto shotblasted untreated metal for internal applications and galvanise then powder coat on external applications - but the galvanising has to be fetteled alot to get a good finish as all the imperfections will show in the powder coating.

The other option is to flame zinc spray and then powder coat - best of both worlds

I would consider galvanising only for wheels if thats what your planning as a tough finish - won't look that good though

Hope this is of help

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stove enameling is definitely tougher and better than powder coat. Powder coat can't be effectively repaired like enamel can - which is why you see taped-over bull bars etc where the powder coat has been damaged. I think stove enamel is a more expensive process though.

Les.

Les, I think you are thinking of plastic coating not enamel or powder coat. Most bull bars have a plastic shrunk film I guess very similar to the other processes and liked by bull bar manufacturers because it is cheap. But get some water under the layer and it rusts the steel underneath and the plastic comes off in strips and looks terrible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2k epoxy is a paint, available in plenty of colours, used on boats a lot.

Oh yeah - I painted hull of my boat with it! :rolleyes: Must have dozed off for a minute there!

Cool, I'll blast the springs and then figure what I'm gonna do. I wouldn't mind coating them with something, sure it'll crack eventually, but they'll stay sane longer with a coat on.

Ok, cheers. Sorry for the hijack Nige...

Al. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy