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Bottom swivel pin change or not ?


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Already put this in previous topic but need some quick feedback.

Stripped swivel assembly top bearing was just in bits inside the housing.

The refub kit only supplied top pin.

Normally bottom pin is left alone but having been in there for 20 years and possible extra load and wear to to lack of a top bearing would you replace it ?

Close to re assembly now and debating wether to order bottom pin and gasket and then its done !

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I was feeling happy with the idea of replacing the bottom pin till I read the post from Les. Okay when it comes to doing jobs on any vehicle I have become a pessimist I assume if something can go wrong it probably will so that way if it doesn't I am pleasantly surprised.

Just spent good couple of hours cleaning up the swivel housing never thought of trying to remove bottom pin first thanks Les.

First job when I get home from work today is make sure bolts do come off.

Still believe replacement best option in this case after 20 years and problem with top bearing not worth risk for price of a replacement. Cheers for the advice.

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Exactly thats why I am now nervous.

Trouble is I ordered bottom pin and gasket before reading comment from Les.

Ah well time for blow torch and wd40 see how I get on.

Would not have peace of mind leaving old pin in place any.

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The bottom pin does not rotate in anything to cause wear like the top one does, the bottom bearing does the work. So as long as it's not been damaged by water and the surface is still smooth and round (i.e. no pitting and snug fit into bearing) I wouldn't have any issues with leaving it as is.

If you've got the bits and you can get the bolts out ok then by all means swap it, but if it's all ok then it will be fine to leave it I would say.

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I received the new bottom pin in the post yesterday so last night decided to take off the old one.

Don't know if I was lucky but had no issues getting bolts off. Gentle heating let it cool then a spray of penetrating oil and out they came heating helps to break the loctite thread lock on bolts.

Happy now can start to reassemble Monday.

Only concern now is scoring damage on inside of stub axle. Not my doing I might add just hope I can get away with fitting needle roller bearing without it getting damaged the area where seal fits is okay suspect whoever fitted last bearing didn't support inside of bearing when fitting and it got damaged.

If push comes to shove I can always replace stub axle at later date with new.

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Don't use anything abrasive to clean up anything that relies on a bearing to be a snug fit - you will quite possibly make things worse. Without the right tool, needle rollers are notoriously difficult to fit, as the cage that retains the rollers is very fragile, so knocking/drifting it in may cause the rollers to come out. To minimise that risk, put the stub axle in an oven and the bearing in the freezer. The diameter of the bearing seat will increase, whereas the needle bearing will shrink. This makes it far easier to fit the bearing - more like pushing it in, rather than pressing or knocking.

Les.

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Thanks for advice Les,debating getting a new stub axle rather than risk the old damaged part.

As the original brass bush is on good order and is now matched to the existing cv.

Thought about swapping it to new stub.

Is it just a straight forward heat it up till it expands and comes off or is it more tricky ?

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Thanks for advice Les,debating getting a new stub axle rather than risk the old damaged part.

As the original brass bush is on good order and is now matched to the existing cv.

Thought about swapping it to new stub.

Is it just a straight forward heat it up till it expands and comes off or is it more tricky ?

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I'm a little surprised at the advice given here.

From experience, the bottom pins do wear, and even a slight change in diameter of the pin (for whatever reason) will cause a wobble that you cannot "tighten" out of the system. - using the excuse of "I'm not touching that bolt as it might shear" is a bit poor in my opinion. If you start going down this road then you're just as bad as the cardboard body work gang and the "och - it will be fine if I don't look at it..."...

My own opinion and maybe a little harsh for Monday morning but hey ho :ph34r:

If you're in a controlled environment to fix said eventuality then get it sorted now, don't wait till you're in a corner and up against it to get something fixed.

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