Jump to content

DISLOCATING CONES


russ3120
 Share

Recommended Posts

I made some by bending 2 pieces of 30x3 bar into a V/U shape and then welding them together into a cross. Weld them to some cross pieces and then fix to your spring seats - easy, cheap and quick.

Buying them is a waste of good money, especially as it is not a particularly good way of giving your suspension flex. With no spring load on the wheel, it is going to have next to no traction and will spin easily. They are also less stavleon side slopes. I only had them on my racer because I couldn't easily get springs that could cope with 14" of travel and this stopped them popping out as a temporary solution.

For a good solution, have a look at what X-Eng have to offer.

Toby

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With no spring load on the wheel, it is going to have next to no traction and will spin easily.

Im easily confused by this but (to me) unless the ball joint has maxed out its travel then theres still a substantial amount of downforce in a wheel even without a spring helping - the back end is still pivoting on the BJ

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im easily confused by this but (to me) unless the ball joint has maxed out its travel then theres still a substantial amount of downforce in a wheel even without a spring helping - the back end is still pivoting on the BJ

The only downforce will come from 50% of the axle's unsprung weight and whatever proportion exerted by the compressed spring being shared between the 2 wheels (lot a lot). The ball joint in the A frame exerts no downward force (except it's own weight and that force created by the displacement of the bushes) assuming that the vehicle is sitting level. Obviously, if the vehicle is at an angle, there will more and more force exerted by the A frame, to a potential of 100% of the load on the rear axle if the vehicle was rolled through 90 degrees, in whch case the other wheel would be off the ground, no matter how flexible your suspension was. The only way the A frame can exert a significant force is if the vehicle is fitted with a self levelling strut as per RR and some 110s (I think), which works (unlikely).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would like to fit some dislocating cones on my disco, but not sure to buy off the shelf or look in to manufacturing some.

ideas on manufacturing would be a help

Cheers

Russ

would prob qute easy to make....... tho i did buy mine :ph34r: as i didnt have time to make them and needed them in a hurry...

post-1650-1175069115_thumb.jpg

I think having them dislocate from the axle as Orgasmic Farmer has done would be better as when the truck body rolls over it pulls the top on the spring with it making a good bang when it seats back in..... great when the passenger doesnt know its coming :D

will try this next..... but i have a 25 mm blocks under the sping seat on the rear alxe (keeps the disco's back side out of the way) so will have to work out the angles...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Dolly :unsure: (ooo I sound like Louis Armstrong!), I think Mr Bias is correct - the fulcrum is the compressed spring not the A frame BJ.

Until bushes bind that is......

The fulcrum is the compressed spring (or high side bump stop).

As the spring seats/bump stops are in board of the wheels you will still get a fulcrum effect distributing the full axle load, albeit unevenly, to both wheels with perhaps 25-30% of load still being on the hanging wheel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oh i agree with agree with what said about the not being too much point of the spring dislocating just with my setup they do.... as i didnt want exta long springs

i do like the look of simon's X-eng spring things may be the way i should go :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve - assuming the bumpstop as a fulcrum that leaves (real fag packet calc) 205kgs plus the 50% of rear unsprung weight on the free hanging wheel (bucket loads of assumptions used in the calc as I cant remember the exact width of a rover axle and the centreline of a bumpstop - and based on the BJ not reaching its max travel)

still need more coffee :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know how much some of you like numbers!

Using the bathroom scales (Sorry Sarah - that's why you now weigh 1/2 ton according to the scales ;) ). This was based on fairly ordinary +2" Bearmach springs on a vehicle weighing 2180kg.

At the point the spring just dislocated, there was 80kg of down force. At +1", there was 25kg, at +2" there was 4kg and at +3", almost nothing.

That was with fairly free linkages, but a standard A frame.

Although if you do the trig, you should get a good deal more than this, you are pushing against the elasticity of the bushes and you get to a point where the forces balance, usually before the Ball joint maxes out.

This shows that although the down-force available after dislocation is pretty small, it is still better than nothing!

I'm sure there is a better solution out there somewhere though!

Si

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can dig that Si :)

Excellent. Just proves that most 4x4 modifications are done for fashion reasons and not for any sound engineering reasoning. That said, where would a lot of businesses be without fashion? (And I'm not talking about Gucci and Prada!) :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having read the above, I now find myself scratching my head in contemplation!

Dislocation cones, enable the spring to relocate after dislocating instead of sitting half on the mounting or even worse against the tyre (both of which I have encountered) I would describe that as serving a function not a fashion!

Fulcrum.....er...

Surely the pressure exerted on the wheel by the load on the spring is irrelevent.....when compairing dislocated spring to extra lenght or fixed spring......ergo...

when a standard spring is at the point of dislocation, then a fixed spring will be at the same point, but at the tyre, an extended spring will be at just short of this point but the loading from the vehical above will still be the same for all three!

dislocated or extended only offer a limited traction by vertue of the unsprung wieght, and a fixed spring will offer no traction.

Does that make sense? Or m I over simplifying things?

p.s. A friend of mine used some spare shock turrets mounted inside the spring as dislocation cones, worked fine!

Nigel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made my own, cost me very little, much cheaper than buying a set.

I Just cut 4 triangles (think they were about 90mm tall and wide enough to fit on spring seat) out of a bit of 3mm sheet, 3mm slot from top down to halfway on one, and bottom up to halfway on other, slot together, then welded them onto some old spring seats that i had lying about, in a sort of pyramid arrangement.

For the top, just jubilee clip, or use two plates to clamp spring in.

Axle mounted cones, similar to the qt ones, in less than an hour, for no more than a fiver!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made my own, cost me very little, much cheaper than buying a set.

I Just cut 4 triangles (think they were about 90mm tall and wide enough to fit on spring seat) out of a bit of 3mm sheet, 3mm slot from top down to halfway on one, and bottom up to halfway on other, slot together, then welded them onto some old spring seats that i had lying about, in a sort of pyramid arrangement.

For the top, just jubilee clip, or use two plates to clamp spring in.

Axle mounted cones, similar to the qt ones, in less than an hour, for no more than a fiver!

that sounds like just the job for me, not sure about the jubilee clip :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy