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Roll cage designs for 109/110 CSW


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As per the title really, the 109 (CSW) is getting a cage this summer so I'm on the lookout for ideas & designs.

The criteria are for a mostly external cage (so protecting bodywork when off-road), expedition-style, keeping the rear doors, seats, and load space usable, not filling the inside with bars like the Camel trucks, and not too heavy.

The tradeoffs are that we'll probably have to stick a hoop & back-stays in the load bed (behind the rear seats) to give strength, and that it doesn't need to be "5-rolls-a-day" proof as some challenge/trials stuff is - if I barrel roll it at 80 then I'll take a full rebuild as a bargain.

It "just" needs to protect the bodywork from general off-roading (rubbing against trees etc.), and protect the occupants should the worst happen.

This style of thing is the sort of starting point:

110_wagon_0.jpg

Although I'd be tempted to run the last bars down behind the bodywork to the rear outriggers to protect the rear corners. Not seen it done so not sure how it would work out.

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Fridge,

When designing my own cage for my RRC I took a look at the Safety Devices site for inspiration.... what I found was PDFs of their designs available for download, which REALLY helped in making decisions. For your truck the 110 catalogue seems to give the best options:

http://www.safetydevices.com/images/products/4x4/2008%20catalogue%20-%20defender110.pdf

You can probably tell just by looking the NAS spec ones are next to useless, but the other MSA ones are of course very good.... A full external version of RBL183 7SSS or a mix of internal and external should give what you want :)

HTH!

:)

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If you have an "X" braced hoop behind the rear seats with stays then add some "X" bracing into the two roof bays to stiffen that lot up. That would give you the best compromise.

I would put tub sliders on the side rather than vertical bars that tend to catch on everything. They will also protect better IMHO as the vertical bars only protect at one location so if you move forwards or back you loose that protection which you won't with tub sliders You would then need to have an internal rear hoop right at the back to support the back of the cage but that takes up no space at all. Or I suppose you could put that hoop outside and position it to protect the rear corners.....

Surely Jez will dream something lurverly up for you...?

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When I made my 90 cage, I put a crank in the rearmost hoop just above the plates which bolted through the body so that the hoop formed the rearmost corners of the vehicle. Otherwise it was similar to your 110 picture.

One option to stiffen the B post hoop is instead of welding a tubular X in place, instead to make the X out of wire with tensioners. As the hoop starts to deform, one diagonal will be in tension when the other is in compression so a pair of wires in tension, while not as strong can provide an inobtrusive stiffener. Same goes for diagonals in the other square voids between tubes. If you cross brace the space above the cab and back of the vehicle, it effectively ties the three hoops together such that you are trying to deform all three hoops to a greater or lesser extent.

This alone may be sufficient for your purposes.

Si

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If it helps I like the safety devices style on the fact its bolt together meaning you can remove parts of it to replace part of it or the truck without having to remove the whole thing.

Mike

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Aye, removableness is a good idea, especially as I fancy galving my bulkhead at some point...

Si - that sounds cunning (I'd expect nowt less), got any piccies?

Nige - I dun parked on a grass verge and it scared me so I need a cage before I go any further. :ph34r:

Bish - I don't really like body sliders, they're a bit ugly. I've actually found that my tyres stick out enough that the body doesn't get close to most stuff, even rubbing along the side. Some sill bars will be included to protect the door bottoms, the end result hopefully being that the point of contact rubbing along a tree will either be the sill bar or the cage roof bar.

X's on the roof and a cross bar running down across the back windows from C pillar to the last upright will probably be the way to go.

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I quite like the arrangement the Suzuki below has for a cage with a hard top, full internal with a couple of external bars running along the roof at gutter level to protect against trees etc. It does mean making some penetrations through the roof though which may be a pain to reseal.

balls_rear_382.jpg

I would add some cross braces to the above but try and keep them removable.

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I'm sure you have some pictures of mine , but if not here are a couple :)

post-1339-0-80089800-1306512835_thumb.jpg

post-1339-0-03455200-1306512874_thumb.jpg

post-1339-0-91171800-1306512927_thumb.jpg

post-1339-0-21066300-1306512981_thumb.jpg

Fridge has seen my truck so knows the bodywork , but for others who haven't, the A,B&C posts are all box section posts horizonally joined across the bulkhead with box and across the floor at the B post at floor level and also box section sillbars under the doors to create a lower cage .

will have to try and catch up soon mate

109's rule :D

Steveb

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Loving your work as ever MrB :)

Steve M: That's tidy for sure, but I'm trying to avoid putting more tube inside the car than is absolutely necessary.

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  • 1 month later...

When I made my 90 cage, I put a crank in the rearmost hoop just above the plates which bolted through the body so that the hoop formed the rearmost corners of the vehicle. Otherwise it was similar to your 110 picture.

One option to stiffen the B post hoop is instead of welding a tubular X in place, instead to make the X out of wire with tensioners. As the hoop starts to deform, one diagonal will be in tension when the other is in compression so a pair of wires in tension, while not as strong can provide an inobtrusive stiffener. Same goes for diagonals in the other square voids between tubes. If you cross brace the space above the cab and back of the vehicle, it effectively ties the three hoops together such that you are trying to deform all three hoops to a greater or lesser extent.

This alone may be sufficient for your purposes.

Si

Makes me think of going through a cheese cutter if there is a accident

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