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Fitting a Workshop Compressor


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I have a small 3hp twin cylinder compressor - with two wheels and a metal foot.  I need to make the space it’s in work harder and build a bench around - and I’m sick of how the foot vibrates across the floor .. I have a collection of rubber engine mounts so I’m wondering how to fix it.

So - do I mount it to the bench using the rubber mounts and run the risk of it vibrating that around - have it free standing (with the bench around it) but rawl bolt the front foot to the concrete? Perhaps with a rubber mount - or something else? 

How has everyone else done this? 

 

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For my blast cabinet I used a FIAC Miami for several years. It matches the specification of yours, twin cylinder, 3 HP, BUT as you can see from the attached brochure, the no-wheel support has a rubber foot. I had no trouble with the unit dancing across the floor, so I would simply add a rubber foot to your existing unit.

Regards.

miami-1.pdf

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Well - that’s slightly embarrassing 😂

I had stood the solid foot on a rubber block in the past and it made no difference - it just skipped across the surface. But I just went in the garage - found an old rubber foot from some furniture- found a cap head Allen bolt that fit up the middle - and what do you know ... no movement at all. 
 

I guess sometimes the simplest things escape your attention.  You’ve saved me putting an 18mm masonry bit into the concrete - or coming up with some complex frame.

Thank you 

Next step probably ought to be to give it some TLC and work out how to check it’s oil level.

Thanks again all.

Unbelievable.

 

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My big compressor is mounted on some rubber feet I found at work. A bit like the tdi and previous engine mounts with two studs and a bit of rubber in between. I also extended the drain so it was easily reached but also means that any condensate built up has to fill about a metre of 8mm tube first.

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Bench is coming along quite well. I’m definitely no joiner though and found it hard work to keep it remotely square. 
 

Big shelf to go in next to the little one - and then another little one to cut and fit in. The remaining gap is where the compressor will live. The top will be a nice high level to put the pillar drill and a bench sander.

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Very nice, there is something about wood I like.... I don't like working with it but I like the apperance lol 

I'm guessing your going to put a sheet metal "firewall" up the side next to the fire ?   If you do can I suggest putting a piece along the top below the window frame, just save that annoying groveling around under the bench for the piece that has fallen down the back 

I've done rubber mounts for my new shed compressor..... land rover leaf spring bump stops lol yep, I've also made up some steel "cups" that will be bolted to the concrete floor when its mounted, Ive gone this way because its an ex-tyre trucks compressor complete with 13hp honda petrol motor.... it likes to vibrate, haven't had a chance to use it yet as my workshop down town I can't mount it outside 

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 Thanks 😊 

A firewall is a good call .... before the bench I used to store all my aerosols and flammable liquids on a shelf I had there 😳

Funny how you can be blind to stuff like that - it was only when showing someone round that it dawned on me. So I’ve made a shelf at the other end of the shop where that all live now.

The gaps were deliberate so I could run the wiring through there for the pillar drill and sander. Perhaps there is a way for me to put holes in a plate over there though 🤔

13hp sounds like it should translate into quite a bit of CFM 🙂

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7 hours ago, Anderzander said:

Funny how you can be blind to stuff like that - it was only when showing someone round that it dawned on me. So I’ve made a shelf at the other end of the shop where that all live now.

Hmmm funny that, at another shop.... grinding away an BOOM lol didn't think about the batteries I was charging.... went with enough force it imbeded plastic case in the 3/4" ply of the floor above, the worst bit was washing off all the bare steel I had around that end of the shop..... 

That compressor I've been told 45cfm at 150psi, but I think the previous owner might have gotten Max opperating and cfm pressure wrong I'm guessing 45cfm at 90psi but that is still plenty for my needs (plasma, shop dust guns, lube misting on the mill n lathe, a small bit of painting and I'm going to build a blast cabinet when I have the new shop)

 

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Cleaned the compressor, found a nyloc nut to fix the new rubber foot, drained the oil, cleaned the level glass (first time it’s been clear for years), fresh oil - and it’s loads quieter ! 💕 and fits like it was made for it.
 

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I could get some sort of soundproof foam and put a bit on the underside of the shelf above - and maybe even make a removable cover for that side compartment with it on too.

Something so satisfying about bringing improved order and function to things ...

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Small but maybe important point re the compressors - make sure the tank slopes slightly towards the drain, otherwise a bit of water stays behind, and can rot a small hole - guess how I know. Just a slight slope on the garage floor (to ensure any spillages drain towards the door) was my undoing.

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2 hours ago, landroversforever said:

Nice use of space! 

On a related note, what'[s the sander you've got and how do you find it? Been on my to-buy list for a while now.

I bought it hardly used from someone - it’s a brand I’ve not heard off. I find it surprisingly useful - the belt is great for angle cut tube, and the disc works well for hand shaping. It’s surprisingly powerful.

Somehow I imagine all your parts are cnc or plasma cut somehow though!  😊

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1 hour ago, cackshifter said:

Small but maybe important point re the compressors - make sure the tank slopes slightly towards the drain, otherwise a bit of water stays behind, and can rot a small hole - guess how I know. Just a slight slope on the garage floor (to ensure any spillages drain towards the door) was my undoing.

The drain on this is right in the middle - what I’ve done before if have a tiny bit of pressure in there when I open it, in the hope it forces it all out ? 🤷🏻‍♂️ 

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3 hours ago, landroversforever said:

 

On a related note, what'[s the sander you've got and how do you find it? Been on my to-buy list for a while now.

I also have one floor standing find it very useful have a coarse disc and a fine belt on it what I have noticed is that I use it more and more to clean up rough edges that I would normally have done with a grinder and flap disc the other benefit for me is I find my hands ache less the following day For example if I'm making agility weaves I may have upwards of 150 seperate pieces of metal to round off and make safe so nothing can hurt a dog when in use prior to getting the sander I would do all that with a grinder and my hands would be stiff and aching the next day not so much now I would'nt be without mine now regards Stephen

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4 hours ago, Anderzander said:

I bought it hardly used from someone - it’s a brand I’ve not heard off. I find it surprisingly useful - the belt is great for angle cut tube, and the disc works well for hand shaping. It’s surprisingly powerful

If I'm looking at it correctly the Brand is Ferm considered to be decent kit in the woodworking world, couple of years ago I bought an Aldi router table at an auction just left a bid on it won the auction and to my surprise when I went to collect the table had a Ferm router attatched to it I had'nt even noticed it all in all a good outcome regards Stephen

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Yes, Ferm stuff is OK, but stiil not as good as the old cast iron machines. 

We have a 6 inch linisher at work, and they are one of those tools that once you have had one, you could not do without.

Great for refacing thermostat housings, exhaust manifolds etc. And for refacing Rover V8 cylinder heads :ph34r:

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14 hours ago, Anderzander said:

I bought it hardly used from someone - it’s a brand I’ve not heard off. I find it surprisingly useful - the belt is great for angle cut tube, and the disc works well for hand shaping. It’s surprisingly powerful.

Somehow I imagine all your parts are cnc or plasma cut somehow though!  😊

Most of my stuff is, although plenty of bits aren't or just need tweaking.

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