Jump to content

jate rings


siggy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Siggy, if you go for a pair choose the first set, as they [iIRC RRC3237 [[corrected part number] ] are the genuine forged military variant from LR that's a good price too. and have been fully tested by the establishment they take their name from,I have a full set of 4 on my 110, used by the Army for underslinging LR's from helicopters :D

Edited by western
part number corrected.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of the three I would say the Jate ring is weaker as it has just one bolt retaining it. The descrition of the 'D' Lifting Rings is misleading as two of the bolts go through the dumb iron and are therefors bolted directly to the chassis. The other two bolts go through the bumber only, but the thickness of the plate added to the the thickness ot the bumper steel makes this probably the second strongest.

The swivel type of recovery is potentially the strongest, but it all depends on how you mount it. If you just drill the bumper and fit it, then I wouldn't really recomment it as a safe recovery point (bumper steel is only 4mm) However, if you make a bracket that allows the strength to be transferred to the chassis, then this type of recovery point could be the strongest.

Les. :)

Edited by Les Henson
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Siggy, if you go for a pair choose the first set, as they [iIRC RRC3327] are the genuine forged military variant from LR that's a good price too. and have been fully tested by the establishment they take their name from,I have a full set of 4 on my 110, used by the Army for underslinging LR's from helicopters :D

Correction to part number it should be RRC3237 :D sorry for the error :unsure::rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem is the bolt. It is a 10mm, 8.8 bolt in double shear. SWL is normally based on 20% of breaking strength. I'm estimating around 6400 kg to break the bolt in a perfect world. It really is too small for vehicle recovery.

I never understand why people want to use them for that anyway. They are poorly placed and not really of the right level of strength.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got JATE rings (fourth down on Famous Four site, which I think is where I got them from) front and back on my classic rangie. Front is tight but fits - I'd guess it'll be the same on a disco, but I'm not sure how the bumper is mounted (they replace one of the bumper-chassis bolts). Back depends on whether you have a tow hitch - without the hitch, they fit with plenty of slack, I've ground mine out a bit to allow me to fit them over the tow hitch 'legs'*, obviously at the expense of some strength. Again, I'm not sure how different the disco is.

Subjective, of course, but the forged JATE rings look much nicer than the square three piece ones :)

Best piccie I could find of them:

slide_imag0005.jpg

*There is logic to this... I remove the hitch when I'm not towing, in order to avoid its notorious ability to act as a highly effective ground anchor. However, because I have an underwing petrol tank outboard of one of the bolts and the LPG tanks inboard of it removing that JATE ring is a real pain, involving dropping the petrol tank which then (just) allows the bolt to be inserted. Now I can just unbolt the tank and swing it to one side, which allows me to withdraw the bolt from the inside end of the JATE ring, far enough to fit the tow hitch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But used with a bridle you can double those figures (which are swl for lifting).

There may be better options but for a simple to fit and inexpensive solution I like them.

A bridle does not double the ratings due to the bridle angles. Also it moves the pull point in so the inner sides are taking all the load. Any attachment that is under the vehicle is useless in most situations as you are normally burried when needing a pull.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bridle does not double the ratings due to the bridle angles. Also it moves the pull point in so the inner sides are taking all the load. Any attachment that is under the vehicle is useless in most situations as you are normally burried when needing a pull.

No, it doesn't double it - but it does spread the load if it's long enough. The longer the bridle (or more specifically the more accute the angle at the centre) the better the load is transferred along the line of the tow instead of pulling the anchor points together. If it's too short it will actually work like a crude pulley and allow you to put very high loads in completely the wrong direction - if your bridle isn't long enough to give you at least a 90degree angle at the centre you're probably better off without it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The military ones are probably the best I think, the others are just knocked up out of a bit of steel. Is it high tensile or mild steel? If the latter (most likely) ... how strong is that going to be?

I have got a couple but I've never fitted them. Always been a bit wary of anything that is held on by 1 x M10 bolt... but the main reason is that when you're buried to the bumper in peat you can't see them anyway!

The stuff about using them for lifting sounds impressive - a bit like the Discovery advert where the vehicle was hung from its tow hitch - but in reality its only a 500kg load on each ring (~2 tons spread over 4 rings) and even taking into account perhaps a 5x safety factor, they could go ping at as little as 2.5 tons and still meet the safety specs, which is not really what you want for recovery. I suspect the actual breaking strain would be somewhat higher than that (as Red90 indicated), but never having used them I haven't broken one either! Likewise with the tow hitch advert - if the hitch had broken at a load of only 2 tons it shouldn't have been on the vehicle!!!

I have come to the view that JATE rings are an inexpensive and easy way to fit a reasonable recovery point where none exists, but no match for a properly made one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got those military ones on the front and back of my 90. I always fit a bridle to the front before getting stuck (which has happened more times than I'd like to admit to!) so I don't have to go digging around underneath in a mud bog. I've never been KERR recovered, but have been dragged off my axles and not bent them or obviously damaged them. As others have said: cheap, easy to fit, and seem to do the job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rounded ones, less wear on your strop and very good value at £15/pair.

Scrapiron would be double that!

John

Ah but you get a nice Allen headed bolt for that price!! ;);)

I think Stephen summed it up well regarding Jate rings..

I have come to the view that JATE rings are an inexpensive and easy way to fit a reasonable recovery point where none exists, but no match for a properly made one.

I'll be fitting these to the front of the 90 until I get something better sorted later on,probably in conjunction with a winch bumper.

Cheers

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience. By using our website you agree to our Cookie Policy