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hi all what size nuts and bolt would you use on a defender rebuild and what quantity of each should you get to stop nipping out everytime you want a nut and bolt any advice taken or given is appreciated

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I hate to think how much I've spent on stainless fasteners for my re-build. I've put together kits of M6 and M8 and M10 in various lengths and head types (typ. 25 mm, 30 + 40mm set screws, 50 mm bolts, all with full nuts, nyloc nuts, plain washers, mudguard washers and spring washers, and also purchased some extra long (120 + 170 mm) M10 and M12 bolts for bolting the rear shock mounts to the chassis and for the rear axle A-frame. I've also bought pop rivits and nutserts for doing the body work.

Paddocks do kits of the bolts for the front and rear suspensions (includes all the trailing/radius arm bolts, replacement M20 nuts for the chassis ends of the trailing/radius arms, new bolts for the panhard rod, etc). These kits are reasonable value for money at GBP 7.50 each - you need two kits, one front and one rear. (The kits are not stainless, but you don't really need stainless for these bolts, and since some of the originals are 10.9 tensile, stainless would not be a suitable replacement anyway.)

Nick.

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You DO NOT use stainless for the suspension just buy a bearmach kit for them ,,, as for all the rest !!! I worked out it has cost me over £80 on nuts bolts washers and metric J nuts, Oh and screws as well !!! I used plenty of copper grease on all the nuts and bolts during rebuild . I am nearing the end of the build phase now and readying everything for paint on mine.

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Must admit a list like this would be handy :)

For a rebuild or just someone wanting to get new bolts before they start dismantling ready for the job

As I(as can anyone)can get all the stuff from the local G & R Fasteners......just sizes,need amount, lengths etc...

Not sure if it says in the parts manual/Microcat etc :unsure:

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I don't bother with lists like that.

I do keep a selection of 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 12 mm bolts stored in the correct labled bin....I buy in quality and cut and tread to length if necessary.

As for stainless. I liken those to metric 8.8 mm sctews and bolts. Made from carrots.

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M6 x 20 , m6 x 30 , m8 x 25 , m8 x 30 , m8 x 40 are all used quite alot during build for seat box , wings etc. as for numbers I would have to recount but quite a few as I was buying the m8s quite often. M6s used on seatbox and roof and to hold wing at top and on the front rad mount etc. As I said it was easier to have bags of each and use them as needed.

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If you are using stainless against ally bodywork you should isolate the two with a plastic/rubber washer - the ally will rot incredibly quickly when placed next to stainless (galvanic corrosion)

8.8 tensile bolts are industry standard and perfectly acceptable for most applications, however if Landrover have fitted a higher tensile bolt you MUST replace like-for-like...

Although regular A2/A4 stainless bolts are not tensile rated they are quite acceptable for non-loadbearing applications.

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A lot of the suspension components are 10.9 or 12.9 rated bolts.

I baught the front/rear paddocks kits and it looks like the bolts are zinc plated anyway. My chassis sat outside in the rain for a year, with the paddock bolts fitted, and they're all still silver and shiney.

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If you want to tell the size etc for buying stainless, if you have the part no from Microcat you can work it out quite often as they use the old BL standards, eg SH106351 is (S)Screw, (H)Hex head, (10) Metric, (6) 6mm, (35) 35mm long (1)Zinc plate.

Nigel

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That's generally but not quite in line with the old BL standards (as I vaguely remember).SH=Screw Hex (can't remember the pozi - maybe that was SX) SS=Socket screw, BH= Bolt hex, NY =nyloc, NH Nut hex, NL I think was a Nut lock (sort of distorted thread) The washers look right. 1 was metric 6 was imperial I think. If you were in imperial diam went in 1/16" otherwise it was mm. The length was in 1mm on screws but 5mm on bolts (measured from under the heads I think for hex & pan head, but including the heads for countersunk, whose start I cant' remeber) . The finish was 0=no finish, 1 zinc plate, 5 black phosphate - and there were others as per the link . I expect if I was hypnotised I could probably remember more. I used to work in Production Control but it was in the 70s. There were codes for self tappers also. I thnk it was ST or SP for self tapper, SW for Screw wood, then the screw no., then the length and the finish.

Nigel

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This handy to know. Ive been buying new bolts as i need them using microcat and google to find the right size. And now youve pointed out about the galvanic corrosion, i best buy some rubber washers too!

Also i wouldnt have thought about suspension mounts being stronger so thanks for that guys!

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You can also buy hard nylon washers as a top hat (ie a washer with a sleeve attached), and a flat washer (have a google, but namrick might be one supplier). The size for 6mm for example allows a 6mm bolt up the middle and you can put an 8mm flat on the other side of the sheet over the sleeve. The sleeve length is easily trimmed with a sharp knife, or there is a short size that does many situations. If you keep the length of the sleeve a little short so that it ends inside the flat on the other side, you can clamp it up successfully. You can then use a steel or s/steel washer on either side on top of the nylon, and the bolt is completely electrically isolated from the thing it is attached to. Seems quite strong - OK I wouldn't do this with suspension, but it seems good enough for attaching brackets etc, provided it has some triangulation of force.Quite good for those stays at the rear of a 110, that are always wet.

Nigel

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That's generally but not quite in line with the old BL standards (as I vaguely remember).SH=Screw Hex (can't remember the pozi - maybe that was SX) SS=Socket screw, BH= Bolt hex, NY =nyloc, NH Nut hex, NL I think was a Nut lock (sort of distorted thread) The washers look right. 1 was metric 6 was imperial I think. If you were in imperial diam went in 1/16" otherwise it was mm. The length was in 1mm on screws but 5mm on bolts (measured from under the heads I think for hex & pan head, but including the heads for countersunk, whose start I cant' remeber) . The finish was 0=no finish, 1 zinc plate, 5 black phosphate - and there were others as per the link . I expect if I was hypnotised I could probably remember more. I used to work in Production Control but it was in the 70s. There were codes for self tappers also. I thnk it was ST or SP for self tapper, SW for Screw wood, then the screw no., then the length and the finish.

Nigel

Correction :Screw PanHead was SP....ie a machine screw with a pozi head

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I'd use Duralac paste, as opposed to rubber washers, as they will degrade over time, leaving you with no protection, and loose bolts :blink:

hi whats duralac paste and where do you get it from

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