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Painting a bertie bargain


white90
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From Good Ole Ebay

and it is in vgc one small mark but not really worth mentioning.

need to paint it white though any tips for a painting novice?

ps I'll be using a spray can from Halfords

Camel trophy sticker 4 sale if you want to come nd collect/peel it off :)

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Rub it down with B&Q sanding blocks - course to fine

Spray with aerosol of etch primer

rub down with fine

spray with etch primer

wipe over with thinners

wait for thinners to evaporate

spray with aerosol of white allow to dry to slightly tacky

repeat

repeat

fix to vehicle

smile

standback

or

small radiator roller and tin of white on two layers of etch

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Rub it down with B&Q sanding blocks - course to fine

Spray with aerosol of etch primer

rub down with fine

spray with etch primer

wipe over with thinners :blink:

wait for thinners to evaporate

Id use degreaser (spirit wipe) as thinners will soften etch up

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Do it the Tonk/JW method.

Dont bother painting new panel until after fitting it to vehicel. Find old paint brush that isnt too stiff. Beat with hammer until flexable if too stiff. Find tin of NATO green paint. Remove lid. Remove skin. Stir with expensive snap on screwdriver casue theres nothing else lying around that will do. Carefull clean snap-on screwdriver with thinners, dry and polish and put carefully back into snap-on toolbox.

Dip stiff paint brush into paint and apply to wing. Dont worry too much about runs etc casue it'll get scratched soon anyway. If old colour shows through too much then make sure you apply a really good thick coat casue repainting it again is too much hassle - it runs a bit but who cares?

Admire how much the rest of the truck has faded casue the new panel looks very green now!

Make token effort at cleaing paint brush by putting it in jam jar full of thinners with other mankey paint brushes. Make promise that you will clean paint brushes properly one day. Put back on shelf.

Get on with other jobs, swearing liberally every time for the next 4 hours you forget the paint is wet and touch it.

And no i didnt forget the rubbing down or priming stages - I just never bother!!!

OK so its of absolutely no use whatsoever by way of advice to Tony, but though you lot might like a laugh as to how the other half do it!

Jon

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You don't rub down etch primer unless there's a run in it. On bare alloy you etch prime, then hi-build primer, then flat with 800 or 1000 wet/dry, then 5-coats of top coat - alowing each to dry before applying the next.

2nd hand panels should be washed first to remove any oil/dirt, then key the surface with 800 wet/dry. If no bare metal is evident, then a barrier paint to prevent a reaction between old paint and new. Top coat as already mentioned, and t-cut/polish.

New panels come with an anti-oxidant coating on:-

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After de-greasing - etch prime:-

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Then 2-coats of hi-build primer:-

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After keying with wet/dry (used wet), 5-coats of the finish, allowed to dry for a couple of days, and then wing assembled.

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Then a slight polish :D

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Much better than boring ol' white :P

Les. :)

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You could always do it the Bodge it and Scarpa, Bill Van Snorkle way. First prepare your panel by wiping the worst of the mud and dust off with a dirty petrol soaked rag. Then dig out your ten year old tin of olive drab enamel to find it has turned into a semi solid mudlike consistency. Discover you've left the lid loose on your can of thinners and it has all evaporated away. Decide to thin the glug out with petrol instead. Add too much petrol and stir thoroughly, now paint is too thin, need to thicken it up a bit. Go down to favorite mud hole and collect a bit of dried up clay silt from the side. Add that to paint mixture, stir thoroughly. Search high and low for electric spray gun before remembering that you lent it to your neighbor 6 months ago to spray his horse float. Look around for any suitable paint brushes, or even brooms, no cigar.You could leave it for another day, but you don't want all your panel preparation work to go to waste. Pull a lump of exposed foam rubber from torn passenger seat squab and proceed to paint car with the dip and dab method. Blow dry at 50mph on way to work.

You can larf, but that is exactly what happened to me one sunny morning when I decided to paint my Landy before driving it to work.

Bill.

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You could always do it the Bodge it and Scarpa, Bill Van Snorkle way. First prepare your panel by wiping the worst of the mud and dust off with a dirty petrol soaked rag. Then dig out your ten year old tin of olive drab enamel to find it has turned into a semi solid mudlike consistency. Discover you've left the lid loose on your can of thinners and it has all evaporated away. Decide to thin the glug out with petrol instead. Add too much petrol and stir thoroughly, now paint is too thin, need to thicken it up a bit. Go down to favorite mud hole and collect a bit of dried up clay silt from the side. Add that to paint mixture, stir thoroughly. Search high and low for electric spray gun before remembering that you lent it to your neighbor 6 months ago to spray his horse float. Look around for any suitable paint brushes, or even brooms, no cigar.You could leave it for another day, but you don't want all your panel preparation work to go to waste. Pull a lump of exposed foam rubber from torn passenger seat squab and proceed to paint car with the dip and dab method. Blow dry at 50mph on way to work.

You can larf, but that is exactly what happened to me one sunny morning when I decided to paint my Landy before driving it to work.

Bill.

Bill, this is the way that you. me and oh so many of us do it - I myself am about to move to 'Light Stone' rather than olive drab though. This allows us to touch up after the odd ding or in your own case after trying to fit a rather large peg into a nasty tight hole :lol:

Tony, bless his cotton socks, is into a slightly better standard, hence the option of etch primer. Luckily he is awar that he will bend that wing again and most likely in style :ph34r:

Les is a bit of a perfectionist and doesn't get out much, so he needs to get that 'just perfect' finish :D

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Bill, this is the way that you. me and oh so many of us do it - I myself am about to move to 'Light Stone' rather than olive drab though. This allows us to touch up after the odd ding or in your own case after trying to fit a rather large peg into a nasty tight hole :lol:

:D

You've just given me a lateral thought. Allbeit a couple of weeks late. Having successfully forced the rather large peg into and through the other side of nasty tight hole, I shouldn't have restored the then resized peg back to it's former size. Now it won't fit again. Doh !

Bill.

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Or my way: get some panels on ebay cheap, use 2 layers of the halfords rattle can paint mixed in the right colour, Spend all saturday to make a nice , clean job of it and stand back and feel proud (nothing too different from the rest of us).

Then on sunday: go to tixover and after an hour, barrel roll the vehicle 3 times from a hill, reducing the wings (and roof) in a very earodynamic shape.

now a year later this was repeated with the wings lasting a week before we tackled argyll. Anyone out there got any sound s3 wings going spare?

Moral: dont waste to much time on them.

Daan

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Do it the Tonk/JW method.

Dont bother painting new panel until after fitting it to vehicel. Find old paint brush that isnt too stiff. Beat with hammer until flexable if too stiff. Find tin of NATO green paint. Remove lid. Remove skin. Stir with expensive snap on screwdriver casue theres nothing else lying around that will do. Carefull clean snap-on screwdriver with thinners, dry and polish and put carefully back into snap-on toolbox.

Dip stiff paint brush into paint and apply to wing. Dont worry too much about runs etc casue it'll get scratched soon anyway. If old colour shows through too much then make sure you apply a really good thick coat casue repainting it again is too much hassle - it runs a bit but who cares?

Admire how much the rest of the truck has faded casue the new panel looks very green now!

Make token effort at cleaing paint brush by putting it in jam jar full of thinners with other mankey paint brushes. Make promise that you will clean paint brushes properly one day. Put back on shelf.

Get on with other jobs, swearing liberally every time for the next 4 hours you forget the paint is wet and touch it.

And no i didnt forget the rubbing down or priming stages - I just never bother!!!

OK so its of absolutely no use whatsoever by way of advice to Tony, but though you lot might like a laugh as to how the other half do it!

Jon

last time i painted mine i didn't even wash the mud off :lol:

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Les,

yoyr sticker are on back to front.

Tony - why bother painting it onyl going to get bent with those carp codrivers you have and will need replacing again soon.

Can i haev your old one then its in better nick than mine.....

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