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Best way to prep a Range Rover 2 door barn find for sale?


reggie
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Pretty much as the title says, I have 2 genuine barn find 2 door Range Rovers and one I'm going to sell on and one I'm going to restore (well that's the intention, if I find time :D).

One is very original (1981 brown one) but needs some welding buts still pretty solid and looks the best on the outside and the other has a battered body (1978 beige one) but really solid underneath, both have been waxolyed and have good solid chassis.

I was thinking of cleaning up the one with the better bodywork (1981 brown one) and more original looking and selling it on for restoration. I'm in the process of sorting the clutch and getting it running, it does run but hard to start and does have a rebuilt engine which is a bonus. After getting it running, I was going to give it a good jetwash and polish it up a little, give it a light valet etc and put any broken bits of trim back together and just making it more presentable and tidy for sale.

My question is, do I clean it up and make it look nice and presentable as that's what I would do with any other car and I'm pretty good at it. Or do I leave it looking a mess, complete with hay and farm mud and advertise it as a genuine barn find? If you guys were looking for a 2 door for resto, would you prefer one that is running and nice and tidy to start with, or one that looks like it's just been pulled from a barn?

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My first piece of advice is, don't use the phrase "barn find". It adds no value, and if anything implies that it's been neglected for a long time. There might be something nostalgic/romantic about a dusty, slightly neglected Ferrari 250 being pulled out of barn, but it doesn't carry over to rusty old Range Rover covered in mud. ;) ;)

Rather than make it presentable, clean it up so people can see true condition etc. Naturally, if you can demonstrate that engine runs and gearbox etc. are ok and just need a refurb, that would most likely result in people bidding more.

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My first piece of advice is, don't use the phrase "barn find". It adds no value, and if anything implies that it's been neglected for a long time. There might be something nostalgic/romantic about a dusty, slightly neglected Ferrari 250 being pulled out of barn, but it doesn't carry over to rusty old Range Rover covered in mud. ;) ;)

Rather than make it presentable, clean it up so people can see true condition etc. Naturally, if you can demonstrate that engine runs and gearbox etc. are ok and just need a refurb, that would most likely result in people bidding more.

When you say it like that, I have to agree on the "Barn find" really meaning neglected for a long time. Just seems to be all the rage at the moment on the bay, even when you can clearly see it's not a barn find, they are advertising it as one. Now I have something else to think about now ?
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I'd agree with Dave, there seems to be a crowd of collectors out there who actively love the idea of pulling some rare treasure out of a barn or hedge, makes them feel like they have discovered a diamond in the rough and gives a far better restoration story.

Given how much 2 and even early 4-doors are going for these days it's worth taking your time & bigging it up.

My eBlag tips:

LOTS of good clear photos of the bits people want to see - how rusty (or solid) are the critical spots, which parts are missing or not fitted, which parts are in a heap in the boot (a potential restorer will be glad to save the hassle of tracking down numerous odds and sods if they're tucked in the glove box).

Photos & words cost nothing - writing a good ebay description can really make the difference, with stuff like this you can describe it in detail - all the good bits, all the poor bits, any known history, etc. etc. and for the love of jeebus write it properly & run it through a spell checker! I've always found that honestly describing any bad bits in detail makes people happier than ignoring or glossing over them - they can see & read what they're getting into, gives them confidence that you're not hiding other stuff and they can see what they're taking on.

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As above. Clean it up, and with a really good ad it will be clear you have some idea of what you're doing, and should* even keep some of those human toadstools away who'll want to swap it for a secondhand tracksuit.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm still struggling to bleed the clutch. Fitted a new master but can't successfully bleed it. I've also just fitted a new fuel pump as that was shot too. Had it running yesterday but ran a bit rough, but not been fired up in 10 years. I need to check plugs, leads, dizzy cap and also going to change oil and filter for sure.

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