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Jamie_grieve

Thoughts and musings on the new defender

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6 hours ago, landroversforever said:

We must have someone on the forum that has traveled though that area or is nearby? :D

Yes, I've travelled that route a few times - I put a photo up of my Range Rover ambulance on the same track a few pages ago. Have covered the route in a Defender and series also.  For South Africans it's got a rep as tough terrain,  but compared to the Alps, Pyreneese or Black Mountains it's pretty tame to be fair. Beautiful country, stunning scenery and quite remote, but not hardcore offroading. 

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Reviews from Car & Driver and Flat-Out Magazine:
 

 



 

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Posted (edited)

very detailed review by a German magazine 

 

Edited by Naks

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2 minutes ago, Anderzander said:

Blimey Naks - are you watching all of these ?

 

Well, we're on complete lockdown here, so have to pass the time somehow 🤣

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Posted (edited)

Review from an Oz off-road mag: https://www.unsealed4x4.com.au/does-the-all-new-defender-suck-we-drive-it-in-namibia-to-find-out/

"Where The All-New Defender Stands Out

When the terrain gets rough, the 2020 Land Rover Defender rides better than any other stock 4WD I’ve tested, over almost any surface. It’s better than segment competitors like the Jeep Wrangler with its softly-sprung solid axles, and it’s even better than the desert-bashing Ford Raptor and its three-inch diameter Fox internal-bypass shocks. ...

That impressive ride quality sets the rest of the tone for the all-new Defender—it’s perhaps the most-comfortable way to travel off-road in mildly technical terrain. Performance over undulating boulders and rocks is impressive, with the suspension reacting hundreds of times per second to the current conditions. The Defender is nothing less than surefooted and inspires confidence in everyone from the most-novice weekend warrior to the professional off-road driver; though those with more experience may find the driving experience a bit more “digital” than they’re used to. ...


Where We’re Concerned
Historically speaking, Land Rover doesn’t have the best reputation for reliability, but it is important to know that aside from a few pre-production issues I experienced, the Defenders I personally drove in Namibia gave me zero reason for concern. Reliability on the other hand is something that has to be earned with time, so I cannot comment on that. It is worth noting that as a brand Land Rover is much more reliable than it used to be, currently echoing the golden era of reliability for Toyota, according to America’ Consumer Reports. ...


Proving Its Mettle (Dirt Road Performance)
...  On a closed course section of Namibia’s finest corrugated gravel, we were cruising near triple-digit speeds while having a casual conversation about our jet lag; at which point we decided it was best to slow down as neither of us could tell an Oryx from a Kudu, and when they say road hazards are real in Africa—they mean it. The speed and comfort in which you’re able to cover ground in the all-new Defender is unprecedented. Modern day explorers who find themselves on rugged dirt roads in the middle of nowhere more than they do the Rubicon Trail need to take note of the Defender. Hands-down, it’s the most comfortable way of getting from A to B in the backcountry.


Van Zyl’s Pass (Technical Terrain Performance)
...  The Defender’s traction control is class-leading, minimally intrusive, and quick to react, thanks to the the now customisable Terrain Response system that allows you adjust everything from steering feel to throttle sensitivity. Sure, you can’t go and tell the system to completely lock your differentials, but in my opinion, that binary school of thought is out-dated. What if I don’t want my differential completely locked because I want to be able wiggle my way through obstacles and actually be able to turn? ...

Within less than a hundredth of a single wheel rotation, the Defender’s traction control system was able to apply brake pressure to prevent wheel spin and enable traction on the more challenging sections of Van Zyl’s Pass. Terrain Response communicates with the suspension which is capable of both cross-linking the airbags to allow it to function as if it had a solid beam axle—another reason the Defender is so sure-footed.

Overall, the Defender exceeded my expectations on technical terrain, but let’s be realistic, if you’re buying a new vehicle for the sole purpose of turning it into a rock crawler, you’re going to, and should, buy a Jeep Wrangler. If you’re an explorer who doesn’t want to turn back when the going gets rough, then the Defender is all aces.


Skeleton Coast (Mud, Water, Sand)
... You couldn’t imagine a worse environment for a pre-production vehicle, especially a Land Rover Defender. Dust. Mud. Sand. Water over the hood. Repeat. We would be wearing all of them in triplicate had we been in a classic Defender. We must have had over a hundred water crossings that day, and let me tell you that the Defender didn’t have a single issue. Sure, we had to pull out the winch, we had multiple tire failures, and we lodged a rock in the brake caliper. But it was real four-wheel driving—this is the kind of stuff that is supposed to happen. ... 

Frankly, I’m surprised we made it through them all, the Defender really has the capability of putting power down in a controlled way that few other vehicles can match.

Somewhere in the Hoarusib River Canyon, a place I never thought I’d be, driving a vehicle I never thought I’d see, the all-new Defender finally made sense to me. It isn’t supposed to be a replacement for its former self. It’s supposed to be an all-new vehicle for an all new world—for an all-new buyer.

The only thing that remains the same? There’s no finer way to travel the world than behind the wheel of a Land Rover Defender.


Should You Buy It?
If it turns out to be reliable, I can’t think of a vehicle I’d rather take on a legitimate expedition. It is powerful, comfortable, and depending on the engine selected, economical. While there are more time-tested vehicles available, none would be able to get the job done with a better balance of efficiency, safety, and comfort, while carrying more than anything else in its segment."

Edited by Naks

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Please keep them coming, Naks.  It's not a car I'd ever see myself buying (I hate some computer programmer controlling the car for me and dislike the whole Big Brother approach to modern car design, plus I don't want back seats) but it doesn't mean I'm not interested and I do want the car to do well.  I mean, if my boss replaced my clapped out work vehicle with one, I wouldn't complain...

Anyway, these reviews are pretty positive.  They flippin' well should be!

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24 minutes ago, deep said:

Anyway, these reviews are pretty positive.  They flippin' well should be!

With them all being paid by LR to write them, you would hope so.

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Indeed , however , right now I'm wondering just how big the marketplace will be when they eventually go on sale ?

It would seem a long lived , simple , easy and cheap to keep going all purpose 4x4 might be more desirable ...

..Not that JLR could have imagined this of course , the same as any of us

I do hope it gets to market and gets used and the feedback will be of interest to lots of us , because it's Land Rover

cheers

Steve b

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22 hours ago, Red90 said:

With them all being paid by LR to write them, you would hope so.

There are days when cynics just irritate me and today is one of them.  If you lack sufficient discernment to see where the journalists are genuinely impressed, you could at least think about why they might be.  

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1 hour ago, deep said:

There are days when cynics just irritate me and today is one of them.  If you lack sufficient discernment to see where the journalists are genuinely impressed, you could at least think about why they might be.  

None of the journalists have any off road experience.  Of course they are impressed.  Every single person is impressed the first time they go off road.  Without experience in other vehicles in driving off road, they can't provide any opinion whatsoever if these are good or bad.

Secondly, I'm not being a cynic.  They are paid by Land Rover.  This trip is 100% funded by Land Rover.  You are only chosen to come if you have said nice things in the past.  If you ever want to drive one again, you will continue to say good things.  Automotive journalism is always highly biased as they need to get the vehicle provided for free.  In this case it is much worse as Land Rover also needed to pay for the entire trip.

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But the journalists represent the target market.

JLR aren't interested in hard core off road users. They've not enough of a demographic to pay.

(Or so JLR think)

They want the aspirational rural market, the market the discovery used to target.

 

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21 hours ago, Red90 said:

None of the journalists have any off road experience.

Secondly, I'm not being a cynic. 

They are paid by Land Rover.

Wrong.  Some are quite experienced.

 And wrong.  

And wrong.  Like all such events, the journalists don't pay but they're not paid either.

I'm not going to get into an argument but still ask you don't make pointlessly annoying comments.  They are impressed because this ugly, over-complicated new car is impressive.  You know that's true.

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1 hour ago, deep said:

Wrong.  Some are quite experienced.

 And wrong.  

And wrong.  Like all such events, the journalists don't pay but they're not paid either.

I'm not going to get into an argument but still ask you don't make pointlessly annoying comments.  They are impressed because this ugly, over-complicated new car is impressive.  You know that's true.

Journos are paid. Either freelance or for who is publishing the article. Without things to review and places to read/watch reviews, they would have no career and no job. 
 

LR might not hand them cash payments. But it will be more along the lines if we will fly you out on an expenses paid review. Most people will pay thousands to partake in an overland trip. Excluding the cost of the vehicle prep. An expensive free holiday and a career boost certainly sounds like a form of payment to me. 

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1 hour ago, deep said:

I'm not going to get into an argument but still ask you don't make pointlessly annoying comments.  They are impressed because this ugly, over-complicated new car is impressive.  You know that's true.

You are not going to argue, while continuing to argue with me. And then making personal attacks by calling me annoying.

How about we agree that we are not going to agree?

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9 minutes ago, Chicken Drumstick said:

LR might not hand them cash payments. But it will be more along the lines if we will fly you out on an expenses paid review. Most people will pay thousands to partake in an overland trip. Excluding the cost of the vehicle prep. An expensive free holiday and a career boost certainly sounds like a form of payment to me. 

Yes.  If they write a bad review, they are blacklisted and will never see a car again.  I'm sure Land Rover was very careful in who to choose so as not to get in that situation.

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3881DC6A-DBA7-4A10-B5C3-BA190E1A41A7.jpeg.fd3d62a3c6d86ed39c6c58d8556179f5.jpeg

For the Farmer, The Countryman, and General industrial use.

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1 minute ago, Anderzander said:

For the Farmer, The Countryman, and General industrial use.

How would you rewrite that for the new car? 

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For the hipster, the estate agent, the coffee shop owner?

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