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FridgeFreezer

I made a Land Rover fastener part number decoder thing

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Oh, thank goodness! 

Very appreciated, this is.

Thank you.

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Awesome, good work Fridge.

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You're an ACE !!

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Steady now, there's a LOT of question marks in the answers it gives - anyone who's got any clues about the differences between types, measurements, etc. or even a few genuine parts kicking round they can describe here (ideally with measurement) that would be most helpful. Perhaps @western, guardian of the parts forum, could shed some light...

So far I'm going from TSD's website and what I can glean from the Series 3 parts book - which a casual glance shows has a less than thorough approach to describing things!

Some parts are listed as "Screw", "Bolt", "Set screw", or "Special bolt" depending which page of the book they appear on :rolleyes: and may or may not have a description of the thread etc.

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I think AB is pan-head pozi , AC is countersunk. pozi The WA, WB etc I think refer to the washer form letter (eg linky). SH is hex head screw (machine screw, no smooth  part on the shank). The SA and SE (SE might be pozi head). I think NY is the 'standard' nylock . These are actually Austin-Morris standards that were imposed across the whole empire, which is why you'll see on the earlier LRs they have a different numbering system (for sometimes the same fastener) from before the black hole that was British Leyland got them.  There did used to be a standards guide, I can't believe all copies have been annihilated. 

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Thanks cackshifter, that's a useful few nuggets, would be good to find that Austin Morris standards doc!

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Worthy post on our informative forum.

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One other point worthy of mention; on changes of design they were supposed to try to use fasteners that were already in use rather than specify another stock item, to keep costs down, so there may be instances where the specified fasteners are not optimal, eg over long bolt . That doesn't prevent us from picking better ones as a replacement

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Oooo, progress:

https://vitessesteve.blogspot.com/2015/10/how-to-identify-those-nuts-and-bolts-etc.html

Quote

Identifying letters

As far as possible, these describe the part e.g. NH is nut, hexagon, BH is bolt,hexagon. Where appropriate, these identifying letters are also related to the material grades employed by the individual components they represent. See Appendix A for further details in this respect.

First digit

This denotes the Thread Series as below 1 ISO Metric Coarse Pitch 2 ISO Metric Fine Pitch 3 Whitworth thread 4 BSG thread 5 Unified Coarse thread 6 Unified fine thread 7 BA thread 8 American Numbered Coarse thread 9 American Numbered Fine thread The first digit applications for non-threaded fasteners and other particular types of fastener component are detailed separately in LGS.06.07 and LGS.08 etc. Note For combination thread studs, the metal end thread series of the stud shall be the basis of coding for the first digit.

Second and third digits

These usually indicate the nominal diameter of the part, in millimeters if the part is metric in % in if the part is an inch thread form, and if the part has a numbered diameter, they indicate the number directly, e.g. 12mm is represented by 12. 1in by 16 4BA by 04. The second and third digit applications for non-threaded fasteners and other particular types of fastener component are detailed separately in LGS.06.07 and LGS.06.08 etc.

Fourth and fifth digits

These usually indicate the nominal length of the component as indicated below. These nominal length increments of coding for the various types of fastener have been carefully selected to give the maximum coverage possible within a logical coded system although it must be appreciated that this imposes certain limitations. For example metric screws greater than 99mm long cannot be coded, nor can short metric studs or bolts which have nominal lengths which are not in exact 5mm increments. Should such components be required in these sizes it is recommended that they be added to existing individual company stock lists until they can be included in a common Group part numbering system for miscellaneous standard parts.

Bolts

In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length of the component, in 5mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in increments if it is an inch size fastener 1/32 in increments for BA and America Numbered Thread Series fasteners.
 

Screws

In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length of the component, in 1mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in in increments if it is an inch size fastener 1/32 in increments for BA and American Numbered Thread Series Fasteners.
 

Studs

In this instance, the digits indicate the nominal length (see note below) of the component, in 5mm increments if it is a metric fastener, 1/8in increments if it is an inch size fastener, 1/32in increments for BA and American Numbered Thread Series fasteners. Note: For Unified studs the nominal length shall be the overall length as laid down in BS2693. For Metric studs the nominal length shall be the standout length as laid down in ISO R/225 and in BS4439.
 

Nuts

The fourth digit represents the basic type of material (steel, brass, etc.) and the fifth digit indicates the various grades or other classifications (e.g. tensile strength) of these individual materials. See also Clause 3 of Appendix A.In certain instances where this nut material code cannot be satisfactorily applied (e.g. for piercenuts where one common thread diameter may be used with varying external dimensional features) the alternative coding is given on the individual part number sheet.

 

Fourth digit

This represents the basic type of material as given below:
0-Steel
1-Brass
2-
3-
4-
5-
6-
7-
8-
9-
 

Fifth digit

This represents the respective grade or other classification of the individual basic materials as laid down in the following clauses.
 

Steel Nuts (having a fourth digit of 0)

For steel nuts the fifth digit code given below in Table 1 comprises an 'equivalent material' grading system which is formulated so as to provide one basic set of fifth digits to cater for the existing standard grades of steel for nuts in the various recodnised standard thread series. It is based primarily on the metric grading system outlined for nuts in BS3692 ('ISO Metric precision hexagon bolts, screws and nuts') as this should in time form the ultimate grading system for steel nuts
 

Notes:

1. The fifth digits 1,4 and 6 (see tables 1 and 2) apply to nuts which are normally used in conjunction with the following types of fasteners.
Fifth digit 1 - low tensile fasteners such as machine screws and other small low tensile bolts such as BA and American Numbered types.
Fifth digit 4 - medium tensile (precision) fasteners. The majority of nuts currently used fall within this category.
Fifth digit 6 - high tensile fasteners for use in special design applications.
2. For further more detailed information regarding the various grades of ruts, the respective BS specification should be consulted.
 

 

I haven't yet incorporated all this and of course it's only one chap's website so could have its own errors.

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On 3/28/2019 at 7:49 AM, Gazzar said:

Very appreciated, this is.

Having a Yoda moment Gazzar? 😀

  • Haha 1

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Moments, there aren't. There just is.

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Sterling effort Ff, I'm away for 2 weeks but can have a look at 90/110 numbers when back home. 

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The last digit is the finish. So 0 is unplated, 1 is zinc plated and I think should be chrome passivated, 5 is black phosphate. There are numbers for chrome and black chrome, cant remember them (yet).

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2 hours ago, FridgeFreezer said:

You mean TSD's website? :D

OT: but on the subject of TSD.... has he done anything with the Ibex project he bought? :)

 

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40 minutes ago, landroversforever said:

OT: but on the subject of TSD.... has he done anything with the Ibex project he bought? :)

Yes but I haven't managed to persuade him to post a build thread yet.

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23 minutes ago, FridgeFreezer said:

Yes but I haven't managed to persuade him to post a build thread yet.

Keep nagging him!! :D 

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Amazing @FridgeFreezer

Doubt I have anything to input but I did get those in line brake unions from Automec if the details of those are any use

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Thanks George - if you have anything with a part number that matches and you can 100% identify the thread then I'm all ears, the more examples the better.

Full disclosure - I've just updated it to (among other things) log the part numbers people are submitting so I can see what needs improving.

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Oh my goodness, user research AND iterative improvements, as you sure LR4x4 can handle this @FridgeFreezer?

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