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Soundproofing a noisey compressor - Thoughts / Ideas Please


Hybrid_From_Hell
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In the workshop I have a very noisey 3HP single Phase 100 Lt Compressor.

When diff building / stripping etc its on overtime, and I end up with a nice pounding Headache.

So, looking to soundproof it

It currently sits under the bench in the corner of the workshop, so it has a back and 2 x sides and a "Roff , but open at the front.

Yes I could pop a door front on - not sure if that would do much

So, what are the best sort of sound proofing materials ?

No, it can't go outside / anywhere else :P

Thoughts pleeeease !

Nige

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Kingspan type panelling is not bad, or sheeting of foam wrapped around the box it's in. The best thing you can do is to isolate it, put some nice big blocks of rubber under the feet.

Getting it out of the garage altogether is better though, seen people put little lean-tos on the side of the garage for this kind of thing. Didn't read...

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I'd start with why can't you put it in a sealed mdf box and work back from there. Because it needs air, how much and where from, what's the minimum apature I need and how can I route it via a route that involves the sound hitting lots of noise absorbing marterial.

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I have what is badged as an ABAC silent compressor

In reality it's not even as quiet as my Hydrovane (that would be one ££££ solution), but it's pretty quiet for a belt driven piston compressor. How? Well it's in a foam-lined cabinet with the receiver beneath it. There are of course ventilation holes, but they are kept to a minimum.

You can even get ones with enclosed workings like this.

Now I appreciate you already have a compressor, but maybe these models will give some inspiration towards reducing its noise output.

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You've a conflict of interests in that you need to give the compressor a decent air supply to keep it cool, but from a sound proofing point of view anywhere air can move sound will follow. Ideally you'd have it in an airtight box and insulated with layers designed to absorb the range of frequencies a human ear would consider offensive. Alas you'd most likely burn out the compressor in short shift because of the inherent heat insulation.

So the ideal for quick and pain free relief is to relocate your compressor to the other side of a wall, outside your work area if possible.

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I have what is badged as an ABAC silent compressor

In reality it's not even as quiet as my Hydrovane (that would be one ££££ solution), but it's pretty quiet for a belt driven piston compressor. How? Well it's in a foam-lined cabinet with the receiver beneath it. There are of course ventilation holes, but they are kept to a minimum.

You can even get ones with enclosed workings like this.

Now I appreciate you already have a compressor, but maybe these models will give some inspiration towards reducing its noise output.

But mine is also 14CFM :D

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2p, look for a dense material for soundproofing... like old carpet as in the other post. The anachoic foam is good for high frequency but if you download a free app for your phone with a sound spectrum analyser on it it will show you were most of the noise is and at a guess it's low frequencies... hence dense material

Yes the apps are not 100% accurate... but give you an idea (microphone not calibrated)

Also place a barrier in front of the air holes ... try to explain.... say you cut a 100 square hole.... put a board in front of it say 300 square with 50mm standoffs... so that the noise has to travel around the obstruction... and put some sound deadening material on the side of the board facing the hole (but still keep the 50mm clearance

Rob

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Yes baffles are great, basically think of them as a means to increase both the surface area and the density of the overall sound absorber and sound travel distance

Anything that you can do to stop direct sound path will lessen the noise (3dba for every doubling of the distance), so if you measure the sound at 1m, the DBA at 2m will be 3 DBA less, then at 4m another 3dba less, that also applies to baffles.

Rock wool is good. But think of the dust collection over time... this will then lessen the effectiveness of the rock wool sound porous surface, hence a means to clean off the surfaces.... barofoam is more like a dense but expanded nitrile rubber lining, used in ductwork (muftilag is another name)

Also, think about some jelly type antivibration mounts, there is a science to this which considers the mass that you are trying to dampen, but if you look on a reseller website you can find a PDF on it (the harder the rubber the less dampening, but it needs to resist the weight too)

The better you make it the more noise it will attenuate (and vibration)

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If the missus complains you’re encroaching into the garden, why not extend it a bit so you can park garden furniture/tools in there? Or if she doesn’t buy that, tell her that it’ll mean she won’t have to look after quite such a deaf old git in your dotage? :P

I know you said you can’t relocate it outside…but by the time you’ve constructed something around your compressor, with all the associated faff of having to clear a space around it, you could’ve thrown up a doghouse/lean-to style thing outside your shed? Few bits of decking board to make the sides, marine ply roof and felt over it, insulate with kingspan offcuts/seconds and carpet, and add some strategic baffled vent holes…done?

Matt

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